Category Archives: Budgets

ATM Warrant / Budget Cuts

MHS field-2

Annual Town Meeting set for 11 AM June 27 on MHS field

The COVID-19 delayed 2020 annual town meeting (ATM) will take place on Saturday, June 27 at 11 AM outdoors on the Medfield High School turf field, with a rain date on June 29.  The warrant for the ATM has been pared down to just the articles needed to enact the FY21 budget, with the intention to hold a special town meeting when the virus permits, perhaps in the fall, to deal with any other necessary town business.

The Select Board voted last night to recommend approval of all the articles.  The Warrant Committee had already voted to recommend approval of all but one or two of the articles, and is expected to recommend approval of the remaining ones when they receive the final numbers related to those articles.

The town’s budget is built off a guess that the town’s state aid will be reduced by 10% next year.  It is a guess because the state legislature is not able to give the town guidance on what to expect, because the federal government has yet to share with the state what to expect by way of federal assistance – creating this uncertainty for every American city and town is not the way government should run.

The Select Board is expected at its next meeting on June 16 to vote to make use of the legislation passed this past week that allows the ATM quorum to be reduced to just 10% of the usual quorum – our quorum is 250.

See the 2020 ATM warrant articles here –

20200609-KT-BOS ATM DRAFT 06082020

Budget cuts

Also at the Select Board meeting last night, the Town Administrator, Kristine Trierweiler, recommended and the Select Board approved the following town side budget cuts in order to balance the town’s FY21 budget:

Town Administrator's Recommended Budget Cuts Department Amount Details All departments $8,279 All office supplies accounts cut by 20% Town Administrator $17,321 Reduce TA Overtime Account to $1,000 (this account pays for OT as well as Retirement Seperations) Town Administrator $5,000 No contractual increase for TA Staff reduction ‐ Town Accountant $25,267 Eliminate (2) part time employees Hours reduction‐Payroll $21,998 Reduced hours for an FT employee Merit/COLA $41,113 Managerial Merit (24 Positions)* Merit/COLA $105,425 All Non Union Town employees 2% COLA (Water and Sewer Listed Below for Enterprise, Police and Fire would have to be addressed in CBA) IT $25,000 Eliminate funding for Network Consultant and capital equipment replacement (both funded for emergency purposes) Facilities ‐ Hiring Freeze $35,000 Facilities 0.6 employee Police ‐ Staff Reduction $54,476 Reduced request by one police officer Building Department ‐ Reduced hours $1,057 Adjust part‐time employee hours DPW ‐ Hiring Freeze $53,102 Vacant full time position DPW Highway Materials $25,000 Level fund from FY20 DPW New position $70,387 No new position at DPW Council on Aging $10,135 Allocated expenses from Revolving Fund (budget offset) Budget adjustments $10,836 Reduced budget requests in various departments Library ‐ hiring freeze $14,710 Vacant part time position Parks and Recreation $48,942 Cut swim pond salaries from the General Fund. Any swim pond related salaries to be paid from the Parks and Recreation Revolving Fund, which receives camp and swim pond fee revenue Police Officer Medical bill $58,000 Make payment in FY20, rather than FY21 ‐ this was planned to be a monetary article Total $631,048 Free Cash Usage Amount Details Stabilization Fund $200,000 Cut annual payment of Free Cash into the Stabilization Fund from $200,000 to $0. CARES/FEMA money (non revolving fund) to be put into stabilization Enterprise Funds Amount Details Water/Sewer ‐ COLA $15,420 No 2% COLA for water/sewer employees

FY21 Town Budget Cuts_KT631 (002)

Budget sheets for tonight

FY21 Budget Worksheet - for WC 6.1.2020 (002)_Page_1

FY21 Budget Worksheet - for WC 6.1.2020 (002)_Page_2

FY21 Budget Summary 05302020 (002)

Mass fiscal situation

Senate Ways and Means Committee’s sobering data on our financial future (shared by Carol Read) –

05-05 Massachusetts Economic and Fiscal Outlook Caucus Presentation_Chairman Michael Rodrigues

05-05 Massachusetts Economic and Fiscal Outlook Caucus Presentation_Chairman Michael Rodrigues

Medfield gets $1,137,716 from Cares Act

cares act

 

Town Administrator, Kristine Trierweiler, was notified by Michael J. Heffernan, Secretary of Administration and Finance, of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts this week that Medfield is slated to get $1,137,716 as its share of the $2.7 billion the Federal government is paying to Massachusetts under the Care Act.  Below are that letter and memorandum.

LetterSecHeffernantoMunicipalChiefExecutives

ANFGuidancetoMunicipalitiesonFederalCoronavirusReliefFund

 

Image

SB at Warrant Committee Monday

TOWN OF MEDFIELD MEETING NOTICE Posted in accordance with the provisions of MGL Chapter 39 Section 23A, as amended Due to the COVID-19 emergency, this meeting will take place remotely. Members of the public who wish to view or listen to the meeting may do so by joining via the web, or a conference call. 1. To join online, use this link: https://zoom.us/j/96357539062?pwd=V21uTEkyeUNIcStpU3FVazVLK0VyUT09 a. Enter Password: 8HBdBF 2. To join through a conference call, dial 929-436-2866 or 312-626-6799 or 253-215-8782 or 301-715-8592 or 346-248-7799 or 669-900-6833 a. Enter the Webinar ID: 963 5753 9062 b. Enter the password: 559007 Board of Selectmen Board or Committee PLACE OF MEETING DAY, DATE, AND TIME Remote Meeting held on Zoom Monday, May 18, 2020 at 7:00 pm Agenda (Subject to Change) Board of Selectmen to meet with Warrant Committee to discuss FY21 Budget, state aid, local receipts, and impact of COVID-19 on the FY21 Budget. COVID-19 Operations/Action Posted: Town Clerk

MMA Zoom meeting

MMA

I attended at noon today a meeting of the Massachusetts Municipal Association’s Massachusetts Select Board Association (NB – MSA changed its name this year from “Selectmen”).  Bleak news about the state budget and the financial aid we will get from the state next fiscal year starting July 1 – may be down 20% this coming year.  The legislative delegation is coming to the Select Board meeting next Tuesday to personally share the bad news.

The only good news was at the end of this slide –

State Revenue and Budget Outlook
• Legislature has Announced that the Fiscal 2021 Budget Process is Delayed
• Administration & Legislative Budget Writers Held New Revenue
Hearing to Revisit Revenue Forecast, with $4B to $6B Shortfall Estimated
• State Budget Process Unclear (Joint Budget? Temporary Budgets?)
• GOOD NEWS … $3.5 Billion in the State Rainy Day Fund should Help to
Mitigate Fiscal 2020 Revenue Shortfalls (and Increased Expenditures)
• GOOD NEWS … Massachusetts Received $2.67 Billion from the Federal
CARES Act to Pay for Unexpected/Unbudgeted COVID-19 Expenses

MMA on our status

Good data in the slides –

MMA-3

Thank you for registering for the COVID 19 Update for city and town councillors and select board members and selectmen.  I’ve attached the Powerpoint presentation.

MMA Update for MSA MMCA Geoff Slides April 10

We will be posting the video link of the webinar to the MMA website.  That will be available Monday in the COVID 19 resource area.  Be sure to check this area often for updates.

 

Please be in touch if you have any questions.

 

Best,

Denise Baker

Senior Member Services Coordinator

Virus legislation – re ATM & budget issues

Legislation the Gov. filed this AM, that Assistant Town Admiistrator Nick Milano says is expected to be passed by the House today, allowing for postponement of our annual town meeting and municipal relief with respect to our impending budget issues –

H4572_Page_1H4572_Page_2H4572_Page_3H4572_Page_4H4572_Page_5H4572_Page_6H4572_Page_7

MMA on Gov’s budget

MMA-3

GOV. BAKER FILES $44.6 BILLION FY 2021 BUDGET PROPOSAL

• $31.6M INCREASE IN UNRESTRICTED MUNICIPAL AID (2.8%)

• GOV’S CH. 70 PLAN WOULD INCREASE FY 2021 SCHOOL AID BY $303.5M (5.9%)

• YET MANY DISTRICTS REMAIN MINIMUM AID AT $30-PER-STUDENT

• CHARTER SCHOOL & SPECIAL ED REIMBURSEMENTS INCREASE

• MOST OTHER MUNICIPAL AND SCHOOL ACCOUNTS LEVEL FUNDED

January 22, 2020

 

Dear Osler Peterson,

 

Earlier this afternoon, Gov. Charlie Baker submitted a $44.6 billion fiscal 2021 state budget plan with the Legislature, proposing a spending blueprint that would increase overall state expenditures by 2.3 percent, as the Administration deals with slow revenue growth by restraining most spending across the board and placing an estimated $310 million into the state’s rainy day fund. The budget relies on significant one-time revenues of at least $200 million from a sales tax “modernization” proposal, and an increase in the tax on transportation network companies.

 

UNRESTRICTED MUNICIPAL AID INCREASED BY $31.6 MILLION

As Gov. Baker pledged to local officials at the beginning of his administration, his budget includes a $31.6 million increase in Unrestricted General Government Aid, tracking the expected 2.8% increase in state tax revenues. Implementing this state-local revenue sharing framework continues to be a significant victory for cities and towns, and is good news in a budget where overall state spending is held to a 2.3% increase.

 

Click here to see the Division of Local Services preliminary fiscal 2021 Cherry Sheet aid amounts for your community

 

OVERALL CHAPTER 70 SCHOOL AID WOULD GO UP BY $303.5 MILLION, A 5.9% INCREASE – ALTHOUGH A LARGE NUMBER OF DISTRICTS ARE EXPECTED TO REMAIN AT MINIMUM AID ONLY

Fulfilling the commitments in the new Student Opportunity Act, the Governor’s fiscal 2021 budget submission would bring Chapter 70 school aid up to $5.48 billion, a $303.5 million increase in school aid. This would fund the first year of the 7-year plan to add $1.5 billion in new state funding for K-12 education. The majority of the funds would implement the improvements to the foundation budget, adding weight for low-income students, English Language Learners, special education costs, and school employee health benefits. While this is important progress for some communities, an initial look at the budget indicates that a large percentage of cities, towns and school districts would remain minimum-aid-only, and receive the minimum $30 per-student increase in the Act. MMA members from across Massachusetts have unanimously adopted resolutions calling for at least $100-per-student in minimum aid for the past several years, and the MMA will continue to strongly advocate for significantly higher minimum aid throughout the budget process.

 

Click here to see DESE’s calculation of fiscal 2021 Chapter 70 aid and Net School Spending requirements for your city, town, or regional school district, based on the Governor’s proposed budget and legislation. This landing page will also include the preliminary fiscal 2021 charter school assessments and reimbursements

 

CHARTER SCHOOL REIMBURSEMENTS WOULD INCREASE TO $138.2M – CHARTER FUNDING REMAINS A SERIOUS PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED

The Governor’s budget would increase the charter school reimbursement account up to $138.2 million, intended to meet the commitment in the Student Opportunity Act to fund 75% of the state’s 100-60-40 statutory obligation to mitigate Chapter 70 losses to charter schools. However, this appropriation does not include $15 million in special charter school reimbursement payments included in the fiscal 2020 budget to address significant hardships, such as excess losses to charter schools that result in a net cut in Chapter 70 aid for the public school system (non-charters).

 

The Student Opportunity Act pledges to phase in full funding of the statutory reimbursement formula over three years, and while this plan may meet that requirement, it would not fix the serious flaws in the charter school finance system. Charter schools will continue to divert a high percentage of Chapter 70 funds away from many municipally operated school districts, and place greater strain on the districts that serve 96% of public school children. Major problems will continue unless a true resolution of the charter school funding problem is achieved, a top MMA priority.

 

SPECIAL EDUCATION CIRCUIT BREAKER INCREASED TO $362.5M

The Governor’s budget would add $17.4 million to fund the Special Education Circuit Breaker program at $362.5 million, an increase of 5%. The Student Opportunity Act expanded the SPED circuit breaker by including out-of-district transportation, a good win for cities and towns. This new transportation component is being implemented over four years, and the Governor’s budget proposal includes the 25% phase-in amount for the coming fiscal year.

 

However, the $362.5 million appropriation amount does not include $18 million that has traditionally been provided to support administration and state agency transportation costs for special education students, and these funds will need to be added in order to ensure full funding.

 

REGIONAL SCHOOL TRANSPORTATION REIMBURSEMENTS LEVEL FUNDED

Gov. Baker’s budget submission would level-fund regional transportation reimbursements at the $75.8 million. This will be a hardship for virtually all communities in regional districts. Reimbursements for transportation of out-of-district vocational students remains significantly underfunded at $250K. Increasing these accounts is a priority for cities and towns and the MMA.

 

McKINNEY-VENTO REIMBURSEMENTS LEVEL FUNDED

The Governor’s budget would level-fund reimbursements for the transportation of homeless students at $11.1 million. The impact of this funding level will vary from community-to-community depending on the number of homeless families that remain sheltered in local hotels and motels. The Administration has been successful in reducing the number of homeless students who are dislocated from their original district, but those communities that continue to provide transportation to many students may continue to see shortfalls.

 

PAYMENTS-IN-LIEU-OF-TAXES (PILOT) LEVEL FUNDED

The Governor’s budget would level fund PILOT payments at $30 million, which would be a significant hardship for many smaller, rural communities with large amounts of state-owned land. This is a key account due to the major impact that PILOT payments have on budgets in very small communities.

 

Please contact your legislators today and ask them to support the $31.6M increase in municipal aid and the $303.5M increase in Chapter 70 aid.

 

Please ask your legislators to address the serious flaws in charter school funding, increase minimum Ch. 70 aid to $100 per student, and increase funding for school transportation, PILOT payments, and ensure full funding for the SPED Circuit Breaker

 

THANK YOU!

$117K more for Medfield is Gov’s budget

Per Governor’s proposed budget, the Town of Medfield gets about an additional $117,000 –

https://dlsgateway.dor.state.ma.us/reports/rdPage.aspx?rdReport=CherrySheets.CSbyProgMunis.MuniBudgEst

FY2021 Preliminary Cherry Sheet Estimates
Medfield
PROGRAM FY2020 Cherry Sheet Estimate FY2021 Governor’s Budget Proposal FY2021 House Budget Proposal FY2021 Senate Budget Proposal FY2021 Conference Committee
Education Receipts:
Chapter 70 6,288,744 6,364,134
School Transportation 0 0
Charter Tuition Reimbursement 0 0
Smart Growth School Reimbursement 0 0
Offset Receipts:
School Choice Receiving Tuition 0 0
Sub-Total, All Education Items: 6,288,744 6,364,134
General Government:
Unrestricted Gen Gov’t Aid 1,539,280 1,582,380
Local Share of Racing Taxes 0 0
Regional Public Libraries 0 0
Veterans Benefits 17,234 15,769
Exemp: VBS and Elderly 42,087 42,628
State Owned Land 47,799 47,544
Offset Receipts:
Public Libraries 17,504 17,373
Sub-Total, All General Government: 1,663,904 1,705,694
Total Estimated Reciepts: 7,952,648 8,069,828