Category Archives: Green

Medfield Foundation Legacy Fund’s 2021 grantees’ report

Legacy Fund Grantees Report

Grantees of the Medfield Foundation Legacy Fund’s latest 2021 round of grants reported to the Medfield Foundation board and the Legacy Fund founders at a meeting this past Monday evening at the Public Safety Building.

  • Peak House Heritage Society showed a remarkably informative video produced by Medfield TV of the PHHS’s archeological dig that the PHHS’s grant funded in the basement of the Peak House. Rob Gregg reported that the most mysterious findings were three 1912 license plates, mysterious because the last residents in the Peak House left in 1910. The rest of the archeological findings are in the process of being analyzed and cataloged.
  • Friends of the Medfield High School Theatre Society reported on the new cyclorama purchased with its grant which was installed at the back of the stage in the MHS auditorium, allowing for better performances. “The replacement of the MHS auditorium cyclorama allows students to engineer complex lighting scenarios; offers those performing a more complex atmosphere in which to tell their stories; and enhances the visual quality of shows for Community members who attend performances.”
  • Medfield Outreach used its grant to commission a survey of town needs, data designed to focus Outreach’s strategic plan. Outreach Director Kathy MacDonald reported on the survey and its results. “In the winter of 2022, Medfield Outreach began work to complete a community needs survey and create a five-year strategic plan for the department. What you see on these tabs is the result of that almost six month long undertaking.”
  • Sustainable Medfield used its grant to further publicize and share its mission promoting sustainability with town residents – “1. Provide residents a one-stop resource of Medfield-specific ACTIONS to improve our environment and reduce our carbon footprint. and 2. Connect community groups to network and collaborate on sustainability.”

About the Medfield Foundation Legacy Fund
The Medfield Foundation Legacy Fund Is a professionally-managed endowment created to support community-driven projects. Volunteer-run and designed to complement the initiatives of Medfield organizations, the Medfield Foundation Legacy Fund raises funds from the community and makes grants to established non-profit organizations through a competitive process. For more information or to contribute to the Medfield Foundation Legacy Fund, please visit https://www.medfieldfoundation.org/legacy-fund.

TOMCAP published today

The Town of Medfield Climate Action Plan (TOMCAP) was published today after a year and a half of work by the Medfield Energy Committee TOMCAP working group.

Posted on: September 23, 2022

Town of Medfield Climate Action Plan (TOMCAP)

TOMCAP Opens in new window

In 2021, the residents of Medfield voted to support a Net Zero 2050 climate goal and charged the Town with writing a climate action plan.

The Energy Committee is proud to presenting the draft of the Town of Medfield Climate Action Plan (TOMCAP) for public comments.

The strategies and actions identified in the TOMCAP mirror the sustainability goals set in plans that Medfield has developed in the last few years such as the Townwide Masterplan, the Municipal Vulnerability Plan and the Rapid Recovery Plan.

Please use this form to comment on the TOMCAP 2022 draft. Thank you!

Medfield Decarbonizers 7/20 at 7:30 pm

From Fred Davis –

Hi MEC members and friends —

Now is the time for more and more Medfielders to be decarbonizing, so I hope you will attend and please invite three neighbors:

Medfield Decarbonizers

Webinar via Zoom
Wed, July 20th at 7:30 pm

A (new) panel of non-expert Medfield residents will be sharing about their decisions and experiences going EV, PV, HP.
Their non-expert perspectives provide our best resource for influencing others.
Your engagement will be helpful!

This is the time for more and more Medfielders to be decarbonizing.

Attached is the flyer, and seriously, please explicitly invite at least three of your neighbors.

Helen Dewey is doing a great job pulling this together, please support!

Thanks,

— Fred

REGISTER HERE: https://tinyurl.com/MedfieldWebinar

TOMCAP workshop – 7PM, 5/19/22

From Helen Dewey –

THURSDAY MAY 19
7:00 – 8:30 PM
INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP - TOWN OF MEDFIELD CLIMATE ACTION PLAN
Inaugural public presentation of the draft Town of Medfield Climate Action Plan (TOMCAP) ____ We want to hear from YOU! Ask questions and give feedback on the draft plan ____ All are welcome! To request babysitting, please email TOMCAP@medfield.net by Monday 5/16 ____ Hosted By MAPC and the Town of Medfield. https://mapc.ma/medfield-cap
Register here:
Dale Street School
45 Adams St., Medfield, MA

MEC questionnaire re TOMCAP

From the Medfield Energy Committee re the Town of Medfield Climate Action Plan (TOMCAP). Get the questionnaire at https://tinyurl.com/23tnp6vv

Medfield Plans to Decarbonize
to Meet Our Net Zero by 2050 Goal
The Medfield Energy Committee is asking all residents to complete
a questionnaire so your thoughts, concerns and ideas can be
included in the development of the Town of Medfield Climate Action Plan TOMCAP.
n After reading the fact sheet below you can access the
questionnaire at https://tinyurl.com/23tnp6vv.
n It will take approximately 5 minutes to complete.
n If you want to participate in the development of the
TOMCAP please email us at TOMCAP@Medfield.net
Please pass this on to friends and neighbors!
This event is not sponsoreed or endosed by the Medfield Public Schools.
Medfield Emissions InventoryResidentialBuildings 39.1%PassengerVehicles 41.6%C&I Buildings and Manufacturing Industries 12.3% Municipal Buildings 3.0%Commercial Vehicles 1.6%Other 0.5%Wastewater Treatmentand Discharge1.2%Municipal Vehicles 0.5%Waste 0.2%(2017 Baseline)Town of MedfieldCLIMATE CLIMATE TOMCAP@medfield.net ACTIOACTIO N PLANN PLAN
Medfield is Planning for Decarbonizing
Medfield voted to support a Net Zero 2050 Goal and to develop a Climate Action Plan to reach that goal (Town Meeting, May 2021).
This public outreach effort by the Medfield Energy Committee (MEC) aims to inform and engage residents in developing the Town of Medfield Climate Action Plan (TOMCAP).
What is Net Zero carbon emissions?
The Medfield Net Zero 2050 goal is in line with Federal and Massachusetts goals and strategies. "Net Zero" means that we reduce most greenhouse gas emissions and offset the rest. Most reductions will be achieved through personal actions that are voluntary and make economic sense.
What strategies are available to reduce our emissions significantly?
Medfielders can remove the most carbon by driving an electric vehicle, installing a heat pump to heat and cool your home, reducing energy needs (insulation, high efficiency lighting and appliances) and supporting
electricity made from renewable sources.
When do I act?
The best time to make low carbon choices is at natural transition points, such as when you need replace your car, upgrade your heating/cooling system, or renovate your home.
Why “electrify everything”?
Massachusetts has already moved away from coal-generated electricity. Our local grid is substantially less fossil-fuel intensive than previously and is mandated to continue to improve. The consensus path, at all levels, to continue to reduce carbon footprint is to “Electrify Everything”.
Why buy an electric vehicle (EV)?
In Medfield, the largest source of GHG gases is from our cars (42%). To significantly reduce our carbon footprint, most new cars will need to be electric. Starting in 2035, only EVs can be sold in Massachusetts.
EVs are already quiet, clean, highly efficient, over all less expensive, require less maintenance, offer huge
public health benefits and new options are becoming available.
What about our homes?
In Medfield, running our homes produces close to 40% of our carbon emissions. We can reduce our
energy needs, use heat pumps for heating and cooling needs and shifting to renewables.
1. Get a free MassSave energy audit and use their incentives and rebates to insulate your home and get the highest efficient lighting and appliances.
2. Electrify your HVAC. Heat pumps are currently the most efficient technology for heating and cooling homes. MassSave offers substantial incentives for installing heat pumps.
3. Install solar panels directly or support solar installations through a community solar program. This can be profitable while supporting the transition to local renewable electricity.
Want to get started? Find information & resources on the Action Portal at SustainableMedfield.org
If you want to engage with the TOMCAP process, email us at TOMCAP@Medfield.net
Where do Medfield’s carbon
emissions come from?
The MEC carried out a
Greenhouse Gas Inventory
of Medfield, pictured on
the right. The vast majority
of carbon emissions come
from our cars and our
homes (81%).
Please take our
informational questionnaire
Use https://tinyurl.com/23tnp6vv to access the Questionnaire
This fact sheet will be a handy
companion to the questionnaire.
Thank you!
Medfield Emissions InventoryResidentialBuildings 39.1%PassengerVehicles 41.6%C&I Buildings and Manufacturing Industries 12.3% Municipal Buildings 3.0%Commercial Vehicles 1.6%Other 0.5%Wastewater Treatmentand Discharge1.2%Municipal Vehicles 0.5%Waste 0.2%(2017 Baseline)Town of MedfieldCLIMATE CLIMATE TOMCAP@medfield.net ACTIOACTIO N PLANN PLAN

Sustainable Medfield

We are glad to see you have joined Sustainable Medfield and created a profile on our ACTION portal.

Here are some quick ideas as you get familiar with the ACTION portal.

We hope that you find the site easy to navigate and helpful to you and your family as you learn and take action for our environment.

–       Explore the ACTIONS and note which ACTIONS you have already completed and those you’d like to do.

–       Read testimonials from your neighbors (write some too!)

–       Join a team/Create a team(s) for any groups you belong to including informal groups like your neighborhood, soccer team or book club. You can belong to multiple teams.

–       Suggest ideas for new ACTIONS

As you probably know, Sustainable Medfield does two things.  You already know that Sustainable Medfield has a one-stop resource with Medfield-specific ACTIONS that residents can take to improve our environment. This resource is populated with ACTIONS developed by local groups and community members.

You may not know that the second thing Sustainable Medfield does is connect groups in town to network and collaborate on sustainability.   This group gathers at quarterly meetings for local group leaders/liaisons. This interactive forum allows for information exchange, knowledge building and the identification of synergies and possibilities.  Check out this graphic that portrays how Sustainable Medfield networks in our community.

You can see when the next meeting of the Sustainable Medfield Group Liaisons is here.  All are welcome (you don’t have to be a Group Liaison).  It’s a great way to learn what the community is working on.

You will soon be invited to join the email list of Medfield Environment Action (MEA).   MEA has an informative monthly newsletter.  We encourage you to accept the invitation and receive information directly from this group.  By joining that email list, you will learn about other initiatives in our community.  

You can read about Medfield Environment Action here.

We are so happy you are part of Sustainable Medfield.

·      Like and follow us on Facebook.  Click here to get to the Facebook page.

·      Tell your friends and neighbors about SM and encourage them to sign up.

·      Say yes to the MEA newsletter.

We believe SM will play an important role in enhancing Medfield’s environment. To achieve this, we need additional volunteers to help us.  Consider joining the SM leadership team to do such things as promote SM in the community, generate new ACTIONS and maintain our website.  We would love your help in any of these activities and would be happy to have a conversation about them. 

We can’t wait to see what ACTIONS you take and to watch your impact grow!  Share your feedback and suggestions for the ACTION portal at sustainablemedfield@gmail.com

Jackie Alford, Catherine White and Megan Sullivan

Co-chairs of Sustainable Medfield

Welcome Letter #1.1

Trash survey by Girl Scouts Chloe McCormack & Amelia Meehan

From Girl Scouts Chloe McCormack and Amelia Meehan, Girl Scout Troop 74900, medfieldtrashsurvey@gmail.com

Survey link  

DPW plants trees at Post Office

DPW’s Drew Dauphinee at the tree and Joe Gorman running the machine

Today the DPW’s Drew Dauphinee and Joe Gorman are planting two good sized cherry trees on the berm in front of the post office. The Town of Medfield owns that site and leases it for the post office to use. North Street is starting to achieve a critical mass of cherry trees for the town to build on, starting with the large one at the Bank of America up through the cluster Bob Borrelli installed in front of his two buildings across from Deb’s and my office.

Jean Mineo was heard to think that once there are six more cherry trees along North Street that she will organize an annual Medfield cherry blossom festival.

MSBA – please fund energy efficient schools

As part of the celebration of Earth Day, I asked to have my signature as a Town of Medfield Select Board member added to the letter below, going to the MSBA tomorrow. Medfield Energy Committee members and other may join too. –

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

April 22, 2021

Deborah Goldberg, Chair
Anne Brockelman
Sean R. Cronin
Matt Deninger
Terry Kwan
Greg Sullivan
Sheila Vanderhoef

Via email to ______

Dear Treasurer Goldberg and members of the MSBA Board,

We are writing to encourage the MSBA to require that all school building projects funded by MSBA be fully electrified, and climate resilient.

The MSBA is to be commended for its track record of helping cities and towns replace or
renovate school buildings in an environmentally sustainable manner.

As your website notes,


The MSBA’s Green Schools Program provides incentives to a district to increase the
energy efficiency and sustainability for new construction and major renovation/addition
projects, by exceeding Massachusetts Energy base code by 20% for 2 additional
reimbursement points. All projects are required to register for the most recent version of
LEED-S or NE-CHPS and exceed Massachusetts Energy base code by 10%.

The MSBA’s updated Accelerated Repair Program provides a new opportunity to apply
sustainable standards to specific building systems such as roofs, boilers and window
systems. The MSBA’s green programs aim to encourage a high standard of
sustainability for all MSBA-funded projects. The MSBA continues to monitor the
effectiveness of its sustainable policies and make recommendations for
improvement, with an emphasis on energy and cost savings, resulting in direct
operational savings for school districts.
[bold added]

As municipal leaders interested in speeding the transition away from fossil fuel dependency, we were particularly pleased to see the highlighted above, as it demonstrates an interest in continuous improvement in the area of sustainability and carbon emissions reduction. We are following up on your interest in improvement to encourage you to tie school building funding to the following requirements for all new or renovated schools:

  • Heat and cooling should be supplied by clean all-electric heating and cooling systems, not oil, propane, or gas-fueled systems.
  • Parking lots should offer electric vehicle (EV) charging stations for staff and/or visitors.
  • Schools built on or near historic wetlands or in floodplains should take into account
    precipitation modeling for 2070 and beyond; this may entail a raised structure or building in an alternate location.

How do these recommendations fit into the Commonwealth’s climate goals?

• Massachusetts has a greenhouse gas reduction mandate of 80% reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 and a commitment to be net zero by 2050; many cities and towns have more aggressive goals. The IPCC issued a report in 2018 noting that to keep global temperatures from rising more than 1.5 degrees Celsius — a goal of the Paris climate agreement — anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions would have to be on a path to fall by about 45 percent by around 2030.
• Massachusetts also has a goal of 300,000 EVs on the road by 2025.œ As HVAC systems are built to last for at least 20-30 years, that means we must act now to eliminate this significant source of fossil fuel energy.
• The National Climate Assessment projects that the Northeast will see dramatic increases in precipitation and flooding.

Why is all-electric the more environmentally beneficial choice? Under state law, the electric grid is powered by an increasing amount of renewable energy every year. In contrast, an oil or gas boiler is running on fossil fuels from day one until the day it is retired.

School building electrification is not a new concept. In fact, schools across the state are
converting to 100% clean electricity to save money, improve air quality for students, teachers and staff, and advance climate goals.
• Lincoln is about to break ground on a Net Zero K-8 renovation school project.
• Wellesley has one net zero ready elementary school in the design phase and is in the feasibility phase of a second.
• Brookline passed a Warrant Article in May 2019 requiring that all new school buildings be fossil fuel free.
• Westborough has approved and is moving forward with a net-positive energy elementary school.
• Arlington is about to break ground on a new all-electric high school where heating and cooling systems will utilize heat pumps.
• Several Cambridge schools have been rebuilt all-electric: Martin Luther King School, King Open School and the Cambridge Street Upper School, as well as the Valente Branch Library and a new administrative building for the entire school department; the Tobin/Vassal-lane school will be rebuilt all-electric.
• Construction is underway on the new Belmont Middle and High School which will be net zero and all-electric with heating and cooling by a geothermal heat pump system.
• Amherst passed a bylaw in 2017 requiring zero energy new municipal and school buildings.
• Concord is at the end of Feasibility for a net zero design for a new middle school and expects to start Schematic Design in the next few months (there was a CV-related delay).
• Lexington’s Select Board and School Committee adopted a building policy calling for construction of all-electric buildings, maximizing onsite renewable energy, and setting high standards for indoor air quality. Lexington’s Hastings Elementary School and Lexington Children’s Place pre-school are both expected to be net positive buildings when the solar energy systems that have been approved are completed later this year.

Energy efficient all electric schools are cost-effective to build and operate, while providing a healthier and safer learning environment for students and teachers alike.

Schools built on wetlands are more likely to suffer from mold and poor air quality, and need expensive repairs, especially as our region sees more frequent and intense rainfall.

Thank you for your consideration of our views. From the Green Communities Program to the Municipal Vulnerability Preparedness Program to the Complete Streets grants and more, we are so appreciative of the Commonwealth’s partnership in supporting cities and towns efforts to advance our transition to a clean economy and make our communities more resilient as we face a changing climate. We would welcome the opportunity to speak with you in more detail about these recommendations and help you build support to enact them.

Sincerely,

Amherst
Darcy Dumont, Town Council, District 5
Dorothy S. Pam, Town Council, District 3
Patricia De Angelis, Town Councilor

Andover
Maria Bartlett, Member of Green Advisory Board

Arlington
Joseph A. Curro, Jr., Select Board Member
Adam Chapdelaine, Town Manager

Ashland
Robert Scherer, Select Board Member

Barnstable
Gordon Starr, Town Councilor, Precinct 1

Becket
Alvin Blake, Planning Board

Bolton
Jonathan Keep, Select Board Member

Boston
Kenzie Bok, City Councilor
Annissa Essaibi-George, City Councilor (At-Large)
Ed Flynn, City Councilor
Matt O’Malley, City Councilor

Braintree
Julia Flaherty, Town Council, District 1
Kelly J. Cobb-Lemire, School Committee Member

Brookline
Raul Fernandez, Select Board Member
Werner Lohe, Climate Action Committee (co-chair)

Burlington
Martha Simon, School Committee Member

Cambridge
Patricia Nolan, City Councilor
Quinton Zondervan, City Councilor

Concord
Charles Parker, Middle School Building Committee Member

Dalton
Robert Bishop, Select Board Chair
Cheryl Rose, Conservation Commission
Henry Rose, Commissioner, Conservation Commission
Joseph Fish, Chair, Green Dalton Committee

Dedham
Jessica Portee, Planning Board Member

Framingham
Geoff Epstein, School Committee Member, District 6

Gloucester
Jennifer Holmgren, Councilor-at-Large

Hopkinton
Jeffrey S Barnes, Conservation Commission (Chair)
Lakeville
Jesse L. Medford, Open Space Committee (Chair)

Lawrence
Jonathan Guzman, School Committee Member – District F

Lexington
Mark Sandeen, Select Board Member

Marlborough
Samantha Perlman, City Councilor

Medford
Zac Bears, City Councilor
Nicole Morell, City Councilor
Paul Ruseau, School Committee Member
Jenny Graham, School Committee

Newton
Susan Albright, City Council President
Alicia Bowman, City Councilor
Deb Crossley, City Councilor
Andreae Downs, City Councilor
Maria Scibelli Greenberg, City Councilor
Bill Humphrey, City Councilor
David Kalis, City Councilor
Josh Krintzman, City Councilor
Marc Laredo, City Councilor
Rick Lipof, City Council Vice President
Julia Malakie, City Councilor
Chris Markiewicz, City Councilor
Emily Norton, City Councilor
John Oliver, City Councilor
Holly Ryan, City Councilor

Northampton
Bill Dwight, City Councilor at Large
Alex Jarrett, City Councilor
Karen Foster, City Councilor, Ward 2
Susan Voss, School Committee Member
Chris Mason, Energy & Sustainability Officer

Pittsfield
Mary Stucklen, Commissioner – Green Commission

Reading
Vanessa Alvarado, Select Board Member

Somerville
Will Mbah, City Councilor
Ben Ewen-Campen, City Councilor
Katjana Ballantyne, City Councilor
Kristen Strezo, City Councilor-at-Large

Taunton
Phillip Duarte, City Councilor

Wakefield
Mehreen N. Butt, Town Councilor
Julie Smith-Galvin, Town Councilor
Susan Veilleux, School Committee Member
Rob Darnell, Environmental Sustainability Committee (Chair)
Mary Hajjar, Environmental Sustainability Committee (Vice Chair)
Robin Greenberg, Environmental Sustainability Committee
Jennifer Kallay, Gas & Light Board Commissioner
Elizabeth Sheridan, ESC Student Liaison

Watertown
Caroline Bays, Town Councilor
Angeline B. Kounelis, Town Councilor
Tony Palomba, Councilor-at-Large

Wellesley
Lise Olney, Select Board Member

Williamstown
Anne O’Connor, Select Board Member

Winchester
Michael Bettencourt, Select Board (Chair)

Elementary School Project – Sustainability Forum 7PM Thursday

Elementary School Project

Sustainability Forum this Thursday

Zoom Link:

https://medfield-net.zoom.us/j/83347163639?pwd=N0phSWk0ZlViS3BPQlQ2TlhkdXBrdz09Hear from Arrowstreet, the new Elementary School Project architect, about the design considerations to be made over the next two months related to energy efficiency and net zero emissions:What is it?Why do it?Where is MA headed?Case StudiesOther Agenda Items:Utility incentives New Elementary School ProcessOther Building Types & Net Zero/Energy Efficiency Incentives for residential users Q&A/Break-out discussions  A net zero building uses only as much energy as it can generate and being able to achieve that is a function of the building design. 
 Please join us to learn more on Thursday!
 Sponsored by the the Sustainability Subcommittee of the Dale Street School Building Committee and the Medfield Energy Committee.

Please follow and share our Facebook page and visit our Elementary School Project website for updates.  Any questions: email DaleStreetSchoolProject@gmail.com.