Category Archives: Green

Renewables now cheaper that coal generation

From the Router 50 newsletter today –

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Two Electric Utilities Have Promised to Go 100% Carbon-Free

SHUTTERSTOCK

The shift is in part driven by cities’ policies.

Two U.S. electric utilities recently declared something remarkable: It’s cheaper to tear down their coal plants and build renewable-energy plants than to keep the old boilers running. For the utilities, the goal is now to retire their coal plants and exceed the economy-wide climate targets set in the Paris Agreement: an 80% reduction of carbon emissions from 2005 levels by 2050.

It’s a surprising move by two (primarily) coal-powered utilities in the American West, but get ready for more. Economics, and politics, are fast converging on a consensus. Committing to a 100% carbon-free goal, even before we quite know how to reach it, is good for business.

The first to make the announcement was Xcel Energy, a utility serving 3.6 million people in eight states from Minnesota to New Mexico. On Dec. 4, the company said it would hit an 80% reduction target by 2030, and eliminate all carbon emissions from its power plants by 2050. Two days later, Colorado’s Platte River Power Authority (an Xcel competitor) approved its own goal of 100% carbon-free energy by 2030.

Jason Frisbie, general manager of Platte River Power Authority, said it was just an admission of economic realities, not a political statement. “This whole thing started because the board wanted to recognize the shift that has already been taking place in the business for several years,” he told a local newspaper. Cities buying its electricity were demanding clean energy, and the price of renewables had tumbled below even the cheapest fossil fuels.

Costly coal

Although the announcements came in quick succession, they’ve been a long time coming, says Mark Dyson of the energy nonprofit Rocky Mountain Institute. At least 90 cities have declared their intention to adopt 100% renewable energy goals. Utilities can accept this, or risk losing their biggest customers.

Two major defections recently drove home the point. In Boulder, Colorado, the city council voted on Dec. 4 (the same day Xcel made its announcement) to leave the utility to pursue its own 100% renewable electricity generation two decades earlier than Xcel. In Silicon Valley, San Jose left the utility PG&E this year to offer a 100% renewable option from San Jose Clean Energy. (PG&E is only delivering 80%.)

After years of hedging their bets, utilities can’t ignore the numbers anymore. PacifiCorp, which relies on coal for 59% of its fuel, recently said it’s more expensive to run 13 of its 22 coal units than to retire them and switch to renewables. The company estimated it could save money by shutting down 60% of its units by 2022, an assessment largely in line with the Sierra Club’s calculations. Globally, at least 42% of the world’s coal power stations are operating at a loss, estimates the research nonprofit Carbon Tracker.

Dyson says it’s just a matter of time before more utilities across the US reach the same decision to replace old coal with “crazy cheap” new renewables. In Colorado, bidders are selling wind for as little as $12 per megawatt hour (MWh) and solar for $23 per MWh. Even after adding batteries to solar farms to keep supplying power into the evening, the cost rises to just $30 per MWh. That’s before income tax credits of 30%  for new renewables built by 2023. Those prices are well below the average US price of nuclear ($105/MWh), coal ($67/MWh), and even low-cost natural gas ($39/MWh), according to Ravi Manghani of energy research firm Wood Mackenzie.

Steel for fuel

With prices so low, investing in new renewable-energy infrastructure instead of fuel is a no-brainer. In fact, that’s the basis of Xcel’s new business model: “steel for fuel,” with steel meaning new wind turbines and solar arrays. Xcel, like most vertically integrated utilities, is a regulated monopoly. A state commission sets customers’ prices so the utility can earn a reasonable rate of return on what it builds without overcharging. More stuff on the ground equals more money. In the case of renewables, argues Xcel CEO Ben Fowke, “everybody benefits.” Xcel earns money on the new “steel” and customers get lower prices far into the future.

More utilities are following its lead. The Southern Company’s CEO said in April that the utility will be “low to no carbon” by 2050. Earlier this year, New Mexico utility PNM said (with no publicity) it will exit all coal generation by 2031. In October, northern Indiana’s Public Service Company said it will save $4 billion by replacing all coal generation with renewables by 2028.

Yet some are still fighting to make coal great again. In the same week of Xcel’s announcement, Wyoming’s Black Hills utility proposed buying an existing coal power plant as the cheapest option with “long-term price-stability,” a characterization that left some analysts scratching their heads (jobs may have something to do with it). Meanwhile the Trump administration is rolling back environmental rules such as the Clean Power Plan and promoting a Coal FIRST initiative to keep coal plants open. But Moody’s Analytics, a financial analysis firm, said these actions “will not materially derail decarbonization trends.”

Built-in climate catastrophe

Accelerating those trends is critical to avert catastrophic climate change. Greenhouse gas emissions have already baked at least 2°F into the climate, and just 15 years remain to avoid another one-degree rise. Stopping the construction of new, long-lived power plants that emit carbon for decades is the only way to avoid this. ”Most warming anticipated this century is from infrastructure yet to be constructed,” writes Ken Caldeira, a climate scientist at Stanford University.

For now, the grid is not quite ready for 100% renewables. Far more storage will need to come online. High-voltage transmission lines must ferry energy from (often remote) wind and solar arrays to their final, urban destinations. With utilities set to approach 80% renewables in the next decade, the last 20% of carbon-free electricity will be the hardest to achieve.

“Technical options exist but it does get costly,” says Tom Wilson, a renewable-energy expert at the Electric Power Research Institute. Right now, the only cost-effective commercial options running at scale are nuclear reactors (very pricey) and large hydroelectric facilities (hard to site new ones). While geothermal, carbon sequestration, revolutionary batteries, and experimental small reactors are among future cost-effective possibilities, utilities are betting the right solutions will come on time. “If you have the vision, and the need to get there, sometimes the technology shows up,” says Wilson.

Michael J. Coren is a reporter at Quartz, which originally published this article.

 

Your hot water heater’s future as a virtual battery

Interesting concept from my Route 50 e-newsletter –

 

How the Humble Home Water Heater Could Play a Big Role in Energy Storage

Power transmission lines.

Power transmission lines. AP PHOTO

A pilot study in the Pacific Northwest shows the promise of “the unexpected battery in your basement.”

PORTLAND, Ore. — In the largest pilot study of its kind to date, more than 270 households in the Pacific Northwest volunteered their hot water heaters over the past year to be used as a battery for the power grid. Participants installed plug-in devices that allowed their water heaters to be controlled remotely, both starting and stopping the heating of water when ordered to by the grid operator.

According to a report on the joint program between Portland General Electric and the Bonneville Power Administration, the success of the pilot study has national implications. If fleets of water heaters, like fleets of electric vehicles, can be harnessed to shift excess electricity from wind and solar power on command, then water could be heated at times when energy on the grid is more abundant—and cheaper.

Equally, if these same fleets of water heaters could be instructed to not heat at times of peak demand, that frees up power when energy is scarce, and more expensive. More broadly, this could reduce the amount of energy storage we will need to build as the power grid evolves in an era of renewables.

Centered on customers from eight local utilities in Seattle, Portland, and the Tri-Cities region in eastern Washington state, the study was a substantial undertaking. Over 92 percent of the program’s participants expressed satisfaction with the trial.

“Every stage required a lot of work: lining up vendors, testing the hardware, choosing marketing materials for customers, and educating our participating utilities,” said Conrad Eustis of Portland General Electric (PGE), who was primary lead co-investigator with Tony Koch, at Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). “Settling on an analysis method that would yield useful results, that in particular took much more time than we expected.”

Operationally, the study relied on the ability of smart-grid enabled water heaters to be fitted with a hybrid communication device: an FM radio frequency receiver that would take the start-and-stop heating signals—at times chosen by the utility—and a WiFi device that could relay all the associated data for analysis. These interactions are called “events” and over the course of three seasons—summer, winter and spring—the program generated over 600 events.

One concept that often trips people up when thinking about using water heaters as batteries is that water heaters are not, in fact, batteries. An electric vehicle has a battery, so it’s easy to see how an EV could be used to take, and give back, energy to the grid. Scale that up to millions of vehicles, and now you have a very large battery to charge up, or discharge, at opportune times.

But how does this work with a humble appliance, like a water heater? Moreover, in the PGE-BPA study, the majority of the 600 test events consisted of a signal sent to customer water heaters to simply not start heating. “Don’t heat now!”—says the signal (by the way, we’’ll heat you up a bit later). To most, this may sound minor. After all, the water heater is not, in fact, putting energy back into the grid. But, it might as well be.

“You see, this has the exact same effect as an actual battery,” Eustis said. “I mean, what do you do with a battery? You choosewhen you put energy in, and you choose when you take it out. So simply choosing not to use as much energy is equivalent to taking energy out of a battery. The heater goes cold. Later, when we have that cold water at hand, we can choose to put excess energy back in from the grid, from solar for instance, to heat it up. From the viewpoint of the grid, it’s identical to a battery.” In other words, a fleet of water heaters can be used as a virtual battery.

Eustis has been interested in energy storage, and in particular the potential of water heaters, for over a decade. To help educate the public more fully on the transformation of such appliances, Eustis has coined the word alonetic, to mean devices that can, at times, beneficially support the operation of the power grid—as long as the needs of customers are met first. The support comes in the form of “events” when communication, or any method of control, activates these devices into service.

Courtesy of Conrad Eustis and Portland General Electric.

Under this umbrella term, devices that can both take and return power to the grid in both directions, or only take power from the grid in just one direction, are beneficial when paired with smart-capability that allows these events to occur either at the choosing of the local utility, or the customer. For this study, the program designers chose an internet-of-things device from e-Radio that plugged in to capable water heaters, turning them into a smart-grid device.

These capabilities are already appearing in Europe and in the U.S. with electric vehicles. eMotorWerks, a Silicon Valley based EV charging company, bundles up the charging preferences of its customers, for example, and works with the California grid operator, CAISO, to strike favorable prices on their behalf. This is called demand-shifting, or demand-response , and at scale it’s enormously helpful to the system. Typically, the customer sets the parameters. But both the customer, and the power grid, benefit.

The Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) has described the potential of water heaters, or specifically grid-integrated-water-heaters (GIWH), as “the unexpected battery in your basement,” adding that GIWH may be “as sexy as Tesla.”

An RMI report in 2015 estimated the total potential value to the grid from these integrated appliances, water heaters especially, at a minimum of $13 billion. Why might that be? Well, power prices follow the laws of supply and demand, and therefore fluctuate, often to a great degree, throughout the day. This was true even before the rise of wind and solar power, but those two technologies have started to make pricing fluctuations more extreme.

In California and Texas, for example, wholesale power prices can now go to zero, or even negative, during the day when solar power creates surpluses, or overnight with wind. These events represent large economic losses across the nodes of the system. To counter those losses, society will have to pair energy storage with the rise of renewables but at great expense. But if software-enabled tools can utilize existing devices for storage, at scale, then large portions of those investment costs can be avoided.

“Most homes in the future will likely have a central-energy-manager,” Eustis said. And it’s easy to imagine this trend already, with electric cars, rooftop solar, a home battery, and also grid-integrated devices now coming on to the scene. One issue that policymakers will have to confront is the technology standard that enable these devices to talk to one another. The PGE-BPA study utilized a standard that, like the USB standard that allows a laptop to connect to a mouse, tied the waters heaters to a radio device. It’s called CTA-2045, and one of the conclusions of the study is that to to use water heaters in the future as a virtual battery, they’ll need to ship from the factory with a common standard.

The US has roughly 125 million households. Harnessing each of those water heaters as an energy storage solution could eventually scale up to major cost savings as the country modernizes its power grid.

Open farm day – 10/28

Borgstein Alpaca Farm Open Farm Day 10/28

baf-openfarmday2018_3_orig

I saw the Borgstein Alpaca Farm booth at Medfield Day, loved it, and said I would post about their open house.

I really like that we have an operating farm in town.  Plus pictures of alpacas on the Internet makes for a nice change from pictures of cats.  The Borgensteins have 17 of their goal of a 20 alpaca herd, per the count up screen.

Medfield officially a Green Community

gca

Medfield is now officially a Green Community

This email from the Department of Energy Resources (DOER) this afternoon, forwarded from Mike Sullivan, announces that the Town of Medfield is now an official green community under the state’s Green Communities Act, and we can start spending our $148K DOER grant monies.  The Facilities Director, Jerry McCarthy and the Medfield Energy Committee plan to use those monies on upgrading the outdoor lighting around town buildings and retro-commissioning of the HVAC controls at the Blake Middle School, as those were easy and fast projects, with good rates of return, to get accomplished.  Since, only once we spend all that initial $148K of grant money, we can then apply for further DOER grants, to do more improvements.

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From: Pfister, Jane (ENE)
Date: Fri, Mar 23, 2018 at 3:20 PM
Subject: MEDFIELD—Green Community Designation Grant — Effective Date
To: “Jerry McCarty
Cc: Mike Sullivan , “Brown, Kelly (ENE)”
Hi Jerry –

 

DOER signed the contract so the town has an effective date (March 23, 2018) and can begin work and obligate funds. The town can proceed with approved measures.

 

Attached is the page one with DOER signature, but when I have the contract back from our fiscal dept. with a contract ID # I will send a scan of the full contract.

 

Progress reports are expected quarterly, see attached for overview of what to include if applicable. Even a brief email is OK to keep me informed.

 

Jane

 

Jane Pfister, Grant Coordinator

Green Communities Division

Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources

100 Cambridge Street, Suite 1020, Boston, MA 02114

 

MEC

Styrofoam Saturday

This from Medfield Green –

Transfer Station sign - Copy

This Saturday is the third week of Medfield Green Month

9-1 at the Transfer Station

 

 

Styrofoam – Have you been stockpiling Styrofoam?  We thank you and this Saturday is the day to bring it to the Transfer Station.

 

We will accept packing blocks, foam coolers, clean WHITE produce and meat trays, take out containers, hot cups such as Dunkin’ Donuts , Honey Dew and Cumberland Farms (without paper or cardboard infused), clean, WHITE foam egg cartons and trays.  Please clean all food/beverage containers and remove any labels or stickers.  No peanuts or bubble wrap.  Next Styrofoam collection planned for October, 2017. Details to follow.

 

NEW:  Unfortunately, we can’t accept colored foam trays because the vendor no longer accepts them due to difficulty in spotting out pieces contaminated by food as opposed to white foam –  however, the art teachers at the elementary schools would love to take the clean, colored foam trays and Colleen Sullivan has very generously offered to transport them to the schools.  If you do have colored trays, please clean them well and either drop them at Memorial, Dale or Wheelock or bring them on Saturday.

 

Please take clean, reusable Styrofoam peanuts to Express Business Center (258A Main St., Medfield), Postal Center (14 Milliston Rd, Millis, MA) or the UPS Store (689 Main St., Rt 1A Marketplace, Walpole).  Fully popped bubble wrap and packing pillows can be recycled every week with plastic bags in the bins at the front of the single stream recycling compactors.

 

The Friends of Medfield Library will be collecting books, CDs and DVDs (no encyclopedias) to help stock their new and improved space at the library.  The Grand Opening will be on May 30th. 

 

 

 

 

See you at the Transfer Station – the place to be in May

Medfield Green Month

Medfield Green Month– May 2017 Collecting Items for Donation, Reuse and Recycling 9 – 1 Saturdays in May at the Transfer Station Date Collection Information May 6 TVs, Monitors, Electronics (9-2) (fee may apply) SWAP opens for season May 3 Electronixredux.com May 13 Reusable Building Materials for Resale High Quality only (9-1) Please email paul@bostonbuildingresources.com directly, before 3 p.m. on Thursday, May 11th if you have any questions or to confirm your items are needed/wanted. No construction debris. See details on reverse & website, too. Baseball Equipment & Clothing – at Transfer Station. Gloves, bats, balls, helmets & pads in children and adult sizes. Food Composting Program Info & Starter Kit Sales (9-1) Sports Equipment Swap at WHEELOCK SCHOOL DRIVEWAY (8-11) Boston Building Resources Disadvantaged youth will benefit. Town of Medfield May 20 Styrofoam (9-1) Foam packing blocks. Foam coolers and foam shipping containers. Please remove any labels or stickers. Clean, white (white only!) foam take-out containers and foam cups (Clean/rinsed). No peanuts or bubble wrap. No colored Styrofoam. See reverse. Books: soft and hard cover, audio; CDs & DVDs (9-1) No encyclopedias Friends of Medfield Library May 27 Clothing, Linens, Towels, Shoes etc. Clean, dry textiles in any condition Medfield Green Epilepsy Foundation Ongoing Mattresses and Box Springs - place in grant-funded container to right of tip-floor. Medications/Drug/Sharps – Public Safety Building has ongoing collection. Household Hazardous Waste–April 29 (9–1) Contact DPW for year-round options Textiles – deposit clean, dry textiles in the Epilepsy Foundation trailer or donation bins. Transfer Station Sticker Required for access to Transfer Station. Stickers can be purchased by mail and at the DPW, $75 for 2yrs. Medfield Green Month is a collaboration of Medfield Green & the Town of Medfield Sponsored by Medfield Employers & Merchants Organization More Details about Medfield Green Month For Additional Information Check Each Vendor’s Website Electronics – Collection of TVs (CRT, LCD and Plasma), monitors, computers, laptops, printers/scanners/faxes, printer cartridges, radios, stereos, entertainment systems, all cables and wires, projectors, all telephones, CDs, floppy discs, servers, Printed Circuit Boards, rechargeable batteries, all consumer electronics. Fee may apply. Electronixredux.com The Swap Area - Collection of household items - provides residents an opportunity to find a new life for their items. It is open Wed, Fri and Sat. from 9 – 3 (drop offs only through 2:30) until Saturday October 28th at 12 noon. The Swap accepts clean, working (or easily repairable) household items that can be used by someone else. Categories of acceptable items are: Toys/Games/Educational materials; Bicycles/Exercise Equipment/Sporting Goods; Household items; Household Electric Items; Decorative Items; Baby Items; Tools/Hardware; Building Materials(limited quantity); Garden/Yard Items; Office Furniture/Supplies; Furniture; Entertainment Items; Books and Magazines. The Swap area does NOT accept any materials that are not accepted as solid waste at the Transfer Station (e.g., TVs, CRTs, automobile parts, tires, oil, concrete, and gypsum). Can you spare 15 minutes or more to help? Volunteers are always needed. Just stop in or contact n.nancyirwin@verizon.net for more details. Town.medfield.net Reusable Building Materials for resale – high quality – no construction or demolition debris – Please see website for complete list and quantity minimums (http://www.bostonbuildingresources.com/donate-building-materials/). Partial list of materials we accept: cabinets, countertops, some sinks, appliances (less than 7yrs old), vanities, ceramic tile, vinyl and wood replacement windows, doors and hardware (interior, exterior, storm – no lead paint), lumber, drywall, plywood, exterior shutters, carpeting, sheet vinyl, wood flooring, latex paint. No glass of any kind. If you would not share it with a friend, please don’t bring it. Please Email paul@bostonbuildingresources.com directly, before 3 p.m. on Thursday, May 11th if you have any questions or to confirm your items are needed/wanted. Bostonbuildingresources.com Styrofoam – WHITE ONLY! We will accept packing blocks, clean white produce and meat trays, clean white take out containers, clean hot cups such as Dunkin' Donuts, Honey Dew and Cumberland Farms (without paper or cardboard infused), white foam egg cartons. Will NOT accept: Colored foam products, plastic utensils, foam cups infused with cardboard or paper such as McDonalds, Newman, and Burger King (ice tea cup), biodegradable produce and meat-trays (for example, GenPak without the recycling symbol), polyurethane foam (PU), cardboard egg cartons, soft foam pads, food containers with plastic film attached (some ground turkey comes in these containers), pipe insulation. PLEASE take CLEAN, REUSABLE styrofoam PEANUTS to Express Business Center (258A Main St., Medfield 508-359-7444), Postal Center (14 Milliston Rd B, Millis, 508-376-1200), or UPS (689 Main, Route 1A, 1A Marketplace, Walpole 508-668-8700). AFTER MAY 20, NEXT STYROFOAM COLLECTION IS PLANNED FOR OCTOBER 2017. WATCH FOR DETAILS. Book Donations - The Friends of the Medfield Library volunteers run the Friends Bookstore to raise funds for the Medfield Library. Books, CD, and DVD donations are accepted whenever the Medfield Library is open, and these donations are used to stock the Friends Bookstore. The Friends Bookstore is moving to a new and improved space in the Medfield Library, starting in May. GRAND OPENING WILL BE ON MAY 30TH. Sports Equipment Swap – Medfield Strong, a 5th grade boys service group, is running a used equipment swap for sports such as: baseball, lacrosse, tennis, soccer, football, hockey, basketball, golf, etc. (Please, NO ski equipment of any kind) Anyone is welcome to take equipment. No donation necessary. All left over equipment will be donated. If you would like to donate but cannot make the Saturday event, please e-mail to make alternate arrangements jennybradbury@yahoo.com or iannone513@hotmail.com. Textile Donations – The Epilepsy Foundation of New England will collect all clean/dry textiles in any condition. This includes clothing, linens, shoes, purses, throw-rugs, blankets and towels. For a list of unacceptable items visit http://donateclothes.epilepsynewengland.org/ Medications/Drugs – The Medfield Police offers free disposal of drugs and sharps. Drugs are being detected in groundwater. Accepted drugs include: prescription and over the counter medication, pills, capsules, patches, prescription ointments, prescription liquids in unbreakable, leak-proof containers and vitamins. www.norfolkda.com. Sharps can be deposited in a separate collection container also in the lobby of the Public Safety Building. Food Composting Come learn about the program at the Transfer Station from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday May 13th. Food scraps, baked goods, cheese, raw and cooked meat, fish, bones and biodegradable bags can be composted. Place your food for composting in the large toters that are kept to the right of the tip floor. We only ask that you don’t include liquids, oils, fat, or plastic bags. Food waste is sent to an off-site commercial composting facility. For more information, go to town.medfield.net and look under Transfer Station. Starter kits can also be purchased at the Transfer Station from 9 to 1 on Saturday May 13th or at the Department of Public Works Building, 55 North Meadows Road, during business hours. A complete starter kit includes a 3.5 gallon pail with animal and odor proof lid, a kitchen scrap bucket, and two rolls of biodegradable liners (count of 50 liners). Cost is $15 (including sales tax). Purchase of just the kitchen scrap bucket and 50 biodegradable liners is $5 (including sales tax). Backyard composters are also available for sale Saturday May 13th from 9 to 1 for $25 (plus sales tax). Please make checks payable to “The Town of Medfield.” This project is funded in part by a grant from MassDEP.medfield green may 2017_Page_2

Green Community recognition 4/12

The Medfield Energy Committee was tenacious, working hard over many years to position Medfield to become a Green Community, by satisfying the five required criteria, most recently by crafting a five year plan for a further 20% reduction by the town government’s energy use – that was filed and accepted by DOER over the winter.  The DOER invitation to the Green Community designation event appears below.  The five year plan was a “further” reduction, because the Medfield Energy Committee already had affected over a 30% energy use reduction since MEC first started its work.

It turns out that saving the planet also helps to save the town money.

And, don’t forget that qualifying as a Green Community also gets the town a $148,000 DOER grant, as well as access to future ongoing competitive DOER grants. So doing the right thing also earns the town money.

Westwood used one of the DOER competitive grants ($250,000) to buy and convert all its streetlights to LED fixtures.

Our own streetlight purchase ($1) and LED conversion (in round numbers, about $100,000) is a warrant article at our upcoming town meeting.  In general terms the town would spend about $100,000 to buy and convert to LED’s, get a now available, time limited $30,000 DOER grant to do so, and save about $30,000/year in future reduced electricity charges, for a pay back of the cost to convert in less than three years.

20170412-DOER-GC Event Invitation Medfield