Monthly Archives: January 2018

MFi OPENS NOMINATIONS FOR VOLUNTEER AWARDS

voty 2017 photo of nominees

Photo of the 2017 nominees.  Rear: Tracey Rogers, Tracy Fedak, Anne Phipps, Nancy Irwin,  and Mary Pat McSharry.  Front: Jim & Patti Schwartz, Jean Mineo, and Lily Doctoroff.

Photo by Colleen Sullivan

THE MEDFIELD FOUNDATION OPENED THE NOMINATIONS FOR ITS 2018 VOLUNTEER AWARDS

Do you know someone in Medfield who volunteers countless time and energy to a worthy community cause or initiative?  If so, now is your chance to recognize that person as part of the Medfield Foundation volunteer awards.

Anyone interested in submitting a nomination for one of the 2018 Medfield Foundation volunteer awards can complete the form on-line at   http://medfieldfoundation.org/volunteer/.  Completed forms must be submitted by February 28, 2018.

The  MFi’s 2018 volunteer recognition reception is scheduled for 3 -5 PM on Sunday, April 8 at The Center. The public is invited, and is assured to be moved by the volunteers’ stories of what they do.  Since 2008 almost over 100 residents have been nominated for recognition by their fellow residents – this year let us include your favorite volunteer.

The Medfield Foundation, Inc. is a volunteer-run private nonprofit, tax deductible 501(c)(3) corporation created in 2001 to raises private monies for public purposes in the Town of Medfield.  The MFi allows donors to designate their donations for particular purposes.  The MFi also allows motivated groups to raise monies for Medfield purposes under the rubric of the Medfield Foundation.  To date, the MFi has raised over $1,800,000.00 for the Town of Medfield, recently started an endowed fund (the MFi Legacy Fund), and celebrated over one hundred volunteers.

 

 

 

MMA analysis of Gov.’s budget

MMA-2

Dear Osler,

 

GOV. BAKER FILES $40.9 BILLION FY 2019

BUDGET PROPOSAL

• UNRESTRICTED MUNICIPAL AID WOULD INCREASE BY $37.2 MILLION (3.5%)

• BASE CHAPTER 70 AID WOULD INCREASE BY $103.6 MILLION (2.2%)

• $15 MILLION IN SCHOOL AID ADDED FOR STUDENTS FROM PUERTO RICO

• MOST OTHER MUNICIPAL AND SCHOOL ACCOUNTS LEVEL-FUNDED

 

 

Earlier this afternoon, Gov. Charlie Baker submitted a $40.9 billion fiscal 2019 state budget plan with the Legislature, proposing a spending blueprint that would increase overall state expenditures by 2.6 percent, as the Administration seeks to close an ongoing structural budget deficit by restraining spending across the board and placing an estimated $96 million into the state’s rainy day fund. The budget relies on $95 million in one-time revenues.

 

As Gov. Baker pledged to local officials on Jan. 19 at the MMA’s Annual Meeting, his budget includes a $37.2 million increase in Unrestricted General Government Aid, and $103.6 million more for Chapter 70 school aid. The Gov.’s proposal for Chapter 70 aid includes a minimum aid increase of $20-per-student, full funding of the foundation budget requirements, and continued implementation of the “target share” equity provisions. The foundation budget calculation would continue modest progress to implement the Foundation Budget Review Commission’s recommendation to use a more realistic factor for the cost of employee health insurance in school systems.

 

Most other municipal and education aid accounts in the Governor’s budget proposal would remain at fiscal 2018 levels. The special education circuit breaker would increase by $10 million, but would remain underfunded by about $20 million. Payments-in-lieu of taxes ($26.8M), regional school transportation ($61.5M), Shannon anti-gang grants ($6M), McKinney-Vento reimbursements ($8.1M) and METCO ($20.6M) would all be level-funded at fiscal 2018 amounts.

 

The Governor would level-fund charter school reimbursements at $80.5 million, a painful proposal that is approximately $85 million below the amount necessary to fully fund the statutory formula that is designed to offset a portion of the amount that communities are required to transfer to charter schools. Level-funding this account would lead to the continued and growing diversion of Chapter 70 funds away from municipally operated school districts, and place greater strain on the districts that serve 96% of public school children.

 

 

Click here to see the Division of Local Services preliminary fiscal 2019 Cherry Sheet aid amounts for your community, based on the Governor’s proposed budget (you will need to insert the name of your community in the field)

 

Click here to see DESE’s calculation of fiscal 2019 Chapter 70 aid and Net School Spending requirements for your city, town, or regional school district, based on the Governor’s proposed budget

 

 

UNRESTRICTED MUNICIPAL AID INCREASED BY $37.2 MILLION

In a major victory for cities and towns, House 2 (the Governor’s fiscal 2019 budget submission) would provide $1.1 billion for UGGA, a $37.2 million increase over current funding. This fulfills one of Gov. Baker’s major promises to increase direct municipal aid by the same rate of growth as state tax revenues.

 

The $37.2 million would increase UGGA funding by 3.5 percent, the same rate of growth projected for state tax revenues. Every city and town would see their UGGA funding increase by this 3.5 percent growth rate.

 

CHAPTER 70 SCHOOL AID WOULD GO UP JUST 2.2 PERCENT

The Governor’s budget submission proposes a small 2.2 percent increase in Chapter 70 education aid of $103.6 million, providing every city, town and school district with a minimum increase of $20 per student. The Governor’s budget would continue to implement the target share provisions enacted in 2007. The Governor’s budget includes a partial reflection of one of the Foundation Budget Review Commission’s key recommendations, which is updating the foundation budget to reflect the cost of employee health insurance. But this adjustment in the foundation budget is not enough to increase aid to many districts. A high majority of cities, towns and districts would only receive an increase of $20 per student under the Governor’s budget. This below-inflation increase is too low, and would force communities to reduce school programs or further shift funds from the municipal side of the budget.

 

Please ask your Legislators to support a funding increase for Chapter 70 school aid that ensures that all schools receive a suitable and appropriate increase in fiscal 2019, which the MMA believes should be at least $100 per student. The MMA also strongly supports implementation of all of the recommendations of the Foundation Budget Review Commission to update the Chapter 70 “foundation budget” minimum spending standards for special education and employee health insurance, and to add to the spending standard a measure of recognition for the cost of services for low-income, English Language Learner (ELL) and other students who would benefit from more intensive services. The Commission recommended phasing in the changes over a four-year period, a position the MMA supports as well. Increasing minimum aid and fixing the inadequacies in the foundation formula are essential.

 

SPECIAL EDUCATION CIRCUIT BREAKER UNDERFUNDED

The Governor’s budget would add $9.9 million to fund the Special Education Circuit Breaker program at $291.1 million. Because special education costs are expected to rise in fiscal 2019, this means that the Governor’s budget underfunds reimbursements by approximately $20 million. This is a vital account that every city, town and school district relies on to fund state-mandated services. The MMA will again be asking lawmakers to ensure full funding in fiscal 2019.

 

CHARTER SCHOOL REIMBURSEMENTS LEVEL FUNDED AT $80.5 MILLION

As noted above, the Governor would level-fund charter school reimbursements at $80.5 million, far below the amount necessary to fully fund the statutory formula that was originally established to offset a portion of the funding that communities are required to transfer to charter schools. The fiscal 2018 funding level is $73 million BELOW what is necessary to fund the reimbursement formula that is written into state law, so it is clear that the shortfall will grow significantly in fiscal 2019. MMA’s estimate is that this account is at least $85 below what is necessary. This would lead to the continued and growing diversion of Chapter 70 funds away from municipally operated school districts, and place greater strain on the districts that serve 96% of public school children. Solving the charter school funding problem must be a major priority during the budget debate.

 

REGIONAL SCHOOL TRANSPORTATION REIMBURSEMENTS LEVEL FUNDED

Gov. Baker’s budget submission would level-fund regional transportation reimbursements at the $61.5 million amount. This will be a hardship for virtually all communities in regional districts. Reimbursements for transportation of out-of-district vocational students remains significantly underfunded at $242K. Increasing these accounts is a priority for cities and towns.

 

McKINNEY-VENTO REIMBURSEMENTS LEVEL FUNDED

The Governor’s budget would level-fund reimbursements for the transportation of homeless students at $8.1 million. The impact of this funding level will vary from community-to-community depending on the number of homeless families that remain sheltered in local hotels and motels. The Administration has been successful in reducing the number of homeless students who are dislocated from their original district, but those communities that continue to provide transportation to many students may continue to see shortfalls.

 

PAYMENTS-IN-LIEU-OF-TAXES (PILOT) AND SHANNON GRANTS LEVEL FUNDED, AND LIBRARY AID UP $191K

The Governor’s budget would level fund PILOT payments at $26.77 million, Shannon anti-gang grants at $6 million, and fund library grant programs at $19.3 million (up $191K).

 

GOV. PROPOSES APPLYING HOTEL-MOTEL TAX TO AIRBNB AND OTHER SHORT-TERM RENTALS, BUT ONLY IF RENTED FOR 150 DAYS

House 2 includes an outside section (section 32) that would subject Airbnb and other short-term rentals to the local room occupancy excise tax. However, this would only apply in cases where the property is rented for 150 days or more. The MMA strongly supports extending the room occupancy excise to ALL short-term rentals. The 150-day threshold would continue to shield a large percentage of seasonal and short-term rentals from taxation, and would not close the loophole that exists now.

 

 

PLEASE CONTACT YOUR LEGISLATORS TODAY AND CALL ON THEM TO PUBLICLY SUPPORT THE GOVERNOR’S PROPOSAL TO INCREASE UNRESTRICTED MUNICIPAL AID BY $37.2 MILLION – THIS INCREASE IS VITAL TO LOCAL BUDGETS IN EVERY CORNER OF MASSACHUSETTS

 

AND PLEASE ASK YOUR LEGISLATORS TO COMMIT TO INCREASING CHAPTER 70 EDUCATION AID, FIXING THE FLAWS IN CHARTER SCHOOL FUNDING, AND FULLY FUNDING KEY MUNICIPAL AND SCHOOL PROGRAMS

 

THANK YOU!

Congratulations to MCPE (& thanks to Middlesex Savings Bank)

MCPE is excited to announce that we have been chosen by

Middlesex Savings Bank 
as one of 24 local educational foundations to
receive a generous donation of
$50,000!
A huge heartfelt thank you to Middlesex Savings Bank for their support and recognition!
 
Read more about their $1.2 million donation here!
 
Please visit www.medfieldcoalition.org to learn about our foundation and the educational grants we fund to all five of Medfield’s public schools.

MCPE’s Treasured Experiences Auction is happening now!
Click here to bid on over 170 priceless experiences generously donated by Medfield K-12 teachers, administrators, and community members.
Act quickly! This online auction ends on Friday, February 2nd! Bid Now!

Medfield in Gov’s budget

The following are our $ figures in the Governor’s proposed budget that was released today.  Our state aid is up about $101K, and our assessments are down about $40K.  The Governor committed to an increase that matches the state’s 3.5% projected revenue increase, but that only applies to the unrestricted general governmental aid category, which has gone up 3.5%.

If all of our state monies went up 3.5%, we would be getting $272K more, instead of $101K more.  As time goes by, the state seems to transfer more of the cost of providing municipal services to the towns.

20180124-Cherry Sheet-Gov budget-120180124-Cherry Sheet-Gov budget-2

CPA

Per the letter below, that I received this week, from Bill O’Donnell, our Norfolk County Register of Deeds, the residents of the Town of Medfield paid $46,790 in surcharge fees at the Norfolk Registry of Deeds for recordings in 2017 to support the Massachusetts Community Preservation Act (CPA).

However, because Medfield has not yet adopted the CPA, the fees we paid were in turn paid over to other towns that have adopted the CPA.

The CPA for me is all about getting the state matching monies, so that our town monies can go further in the three categories where the CPA requires the monies to be spent:

  • open spaces and recreation
  • historic preservation
  • affordable housing

Originally the state matching monies were 100%, but as more towns joined the CPA the match declined.  In recent years the legislature has even added monies to the match to make it more attractive.  Last year the state matching money was 17%.

WILLIAM P. O'DONNELL REGISTER OF DEEDS ASSISTANT RECORDER OF THE LAND COURT Selectman Osler L. Peterson Medfield Board of Selectmen l 0 Copperwood Road Medfield, MA 02052 Dear Selectman Peterson, COUNTY OF NORFOLK COUNTY OF PRESIDENTS REGISTRY OF DEEDS NORFOLK REGISTRY DISTRICT OF THE LAND COURT January 19, 2018 As Register of the Norfolk County Registry of Deeds, I thought the chart on the reverse side would be of interest to you. It provides an illustration of the funds generated by the Community Preservation Act (CPA) in your community based on recorded real estate filings during the 2017 calendar year. The Community Preservation Act was signed into law on September 14, 2000. Today there are 172 Massachusetts communities that have adopted the Community Preservation Act. Just over 1.75 billion dollars has been raised to date statewide. The Registry of Deeds, at no additional cost to the Commonwealth or local communities, collects these revenues for the state once a document is recorded. The monies are then forwarded to the Massachusetts Department of Revenue on a monthly basis. The funds collected by the Commonwealth are then redistributed back to the communities that have adopted the CPA through a variety of formulas. The Norfolk County Registry of Deeds which is located at 649 High Street, Dedham, is the principal office for real property in Norfolk County. The Registry is a resource for homeowners, title examiners, mortgage lenders, genealogists, municipalities and others with a need for secure, accurate, accessible land record information. For assistance please contact our Customer Service Center at (781) 461-610 I, or visit our website at www.norfolkdeeds.org. I hope you find this data to be timely, informative and useful. In the meantime, ifl can be of assistance to you, please do not hesitate to contact me at 781-461-6116 or by email at registerodonnell@norfolkdeeds.org. I wish you a healthy New Year. Sincerely yours, ~411?7~ William P. O' Donnell Norfolk County Register of Deeds WPO/aag 649 HIGH STREET. DEDHAM . MASSACHUSETTS 02026 T E L EPHONE 78 1·461 ·6 1 16 FAX 7 81 -326·4246 EM A IL registerodonnel l@norfolkdeeds.org www .norfolkdeeds.org ~ facebook.com/NorfolkDeeds ~ twitter.com/NorfolkDeeds You£m youtube.com/NorfolkDeeds Linked linkedin.com/company/Norfolk-County-Registry-of-Deeds (@ @NorfolkDeeds NORFOLK COUNTY REGISTRY OF DEEDS COMMUNITY PRESERVATION ACT (CPA) SURCHARGES BY TOWN FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2017 TOWN TOTAL AVON $18,030 BELLINGHAM $68,890 BRAINTREE $124,580 BROOKLINE $166,930 CANTON $94,080 COHASSET $42,810 DEDHAM $90,580 DOVER $29,780 FOXBOROUGH $62,360 FRANKLIN $117,830 HOLBROOK $47,080 MEDFIEI,n $46,790 MEDWAY $48,810 MILLIS $34,740 MILTON $95,820 NEEDHAM $108,540 NORFOLK $40,180 NORWOOD $83,730 PLAINVILLE $35,410 QUINCY $273,240 RANDOLPH $110,070 SHARON $60,270 STOUGHTON $105,140 WALPOLE $94,180 WELLESLEY $103,680 WESTWOOD $54,980 WEYMOUTH $215,200 WRENTHAM $53,87020180119-Wm O'Donnell-ltr from_Page_2

MMA annual meeting

Gus and i attended the Massachusetts Municipal Association’s annual meeting both yesterday and today at the Hynes Convention Center.

Governor Baker told us yesterday that his administration will continue to increase the state local aid by the same percentage that state revenues increase, meaning that it will increase 3.5% next year, because that is the consensus projection, even though the revenue increases may not actually be that high.

Senators Warren and Markey stayed in DC to deal with the government shutdown, and appeared only by videos.

Lots of good information from other selectmen, state officials, and service providers.

Eagle Scouts

Daniel Whelan and Tadhg Matthews this afternoon were celebrated at their Eagle Scout Court of Honor at the UCC this afternoon. Here they are shown with their parents.