Monthly Archives: April 2013

Medfield Marijuana

Carol Read of Medfield is working in Needham as their federally funded substance abuse coordinator, seeking to reduce substance abuse amongst Needham youth, and she also volunteers with Medfield Cares About Prevention (MCAP) (www.MedfieldCares.org).  Carol also works on the state level with the Massachusetts Prevention Alliance (MAPA), which became active during the recent ballot initiative.  Carol and her MAPA colleagues invited me to attend a kick off dinner last Friday evening for a group called Project SAM, Smart Approaches to Marijuana in Massachusetts.

Project SAM is headlined by

  • former Congressman Patrick Kennedy,
  • a child psychiatrist from Colorado who has studied the increased problems his patients have had because of marijuana, and
  • a former drug adviser to recent U.S. presidents.

Friday evening the Project Sam members shared the data developed in places like Colorado, that has had medical marijuana for a while.  The facts I took home were that

  • the brains of young people are not fully developed until their mid-20’s, making them more susceptible to substances
  • marijuana use by our young people puts them at increased risk for mental health hospitalizations and substance abuse problems in later life (both statistically rise with marijuana use by young people),
  • fairly low levels of marijuana use (2-3 times a week for 2-3 years) were shown by a New Zealand study to reduce IQ by up to 8 points.

If these facts are correct, it is not responsible for we as parents, as adults, as a town, and as a society to allow our young people to injure themselves by means of marijuana use, without giving them all the facts.  The data I heard on Friday evening really scares me for the risks that our youth are taking with the marijuana use that we know is happening in Medfield.  Our youth need to get these complete facts, so they can at least make an informed decision.

Library Gala 5/4

The Medfield Memorial Library is holding its 4th Annual Library Gala this Saturday from 12-3 PM, and the website shows a panoply of really interesting sounding events and people.  Get the details

greening medfield gala ad

Activities

Sheep Shearing
Petting Zoo
Needle Felting
Spinning Wool & Silk
Rug & Punch Hooking
Monks’ Etchings of Sheep
Bee Products & Info
Jazz Music

Crafts for Kids
Build Recycled Sculpture
Sustainable Farming
Hydroponic Gardening
Living & Eating Green
Plants & Seedlings
Container Gardening
The Giving Tree-A Play

Partners

Animal Shelter
Thunder Hill 4H
Little Bee Hive Farm
Betty Sanders, Master Gardener
Powisset Farm
Medfield Green
Energy Committee
Girl Scouts – Troop #74900

Historical Society
Friends of the Library
Charles River Rug Guild
Esme’s Heart Pockets
Zullo Gallery
Brad Ellenberg Jazz Quintet
Gazebo Players
Deadfield Artists Guild

House “Cherry Sheets” out

House issues its “Cherry Sheets”- the totals –

FY13 = $7,051,687

Gov’s FY14 = $7,148,536

House’s FY14 = $7,157,142

========================

Massachusetts Department of Revenue

Division of Local Services

FY2014 Local Aid Estimates

 

MEDFIELD

 


 

FY2013 Cherry Sheet Estimate

FY2014 Governor’s Budget (H1)

FY2014 House Final Budget Proposal

Education:    

  Chapter 70

5,730,534

5,797,959

5,797,959

  School Transportation

0

0

0

  Charter Tuition Reimbursement

59

67

7,206

  Smart Growth School Reimbursement

0

0

0

Offset Receipts:

  School Lunch

10116

9,260

9,260

  School Choice Receiving Tuition

0

0

0

Sub-Total, All Education Items

5,740,709

5,807,286

5,814,425

 

General Government:

  Unrestricted General Government Aid

1,226,088

1,226,088

1,255,070

   Annual Formula Aid Calculation

0

26,530

  Local Share of Racing Taxes

0

0

0

  Regional Public Libraries

0

0

0

  Urban Renewal Projects

0

0

0

  Veterans’ Benefits

13,333

17,624

16,639

  State Owned Land

31,357

31,380

31,380

  Exemptions: Vets, Blind, Surviving Spouses

& Elderly

26,472

26,028

26,028

Offset Receipts:

  Public Libraries

13,728

13,600

13,600

Sub-Total, All General Government

1,310,978

1,341,250

1,342,717

 

 

 

Total Estimated Receipts

7,051,687

7,148,536

7,157,142

 

 

 

 

FY2014 Local Aid Assessments

MEDFIELD

 

 

FY2013 Cherry Sheet Estimate

FY2014 Governor’s Budget (H1)

FY2014 House Final Budget Proposal

County Assessments:

County Tax

108,925

111,680

111,680

Suffolk County Retirement

0

0

0

Sub-Total, County Assessments

108,925

111,680

111,680

 

 

 

 

State Assessments and Charges:

 

 

 

  Retired Employees Health Insurance

0

0

0

  Retired Teachers Health Insurance

0

0

0

  Mosquito Control Projects

52,872

55,872

55,872

  Air Pollution Districts

4,280

4,445

4,445

  Metropolitan Area Planning Council

3,788

3,883

3,883

  Old Colony Planning Council

0

0

0

  RMV Non-Renewal Surcharge

6,560

5,260

5,260

Sub-Total, State Assessments

67,500

69,460

69,460

 

 

 

Transportation Authorities:

 

 

  MBTA

254010

256,764

256,764

  Boston Metro. Transit District

0

0

0

  Regional Transit

0

0

Sub-Total, Transportation Authorities

254,010

256,764

256,764

 

 

 

Annual Charges Against Receipts:

 

 

  Special Education

0

4,508

4,508

  STRAP Repayments

0

0

0

Sub-Total, Annual Charges

   0

4,508

4,508

 

 

 

Tuition Assessments

 

 

  School Choice Sending Tuition

10,625

5,000

5,000

  Charter School Sending Tuition

0

0

12,041

  Essex County Tech Sending Tuition

0

0

0

Sub-Total, Tuition Assessments

10,625

5,000

17,041

 

 

 

Total Estimated Charges

441,060

447,412

459,453

 

For information about how the estimates were determined and what may cause them to change, click: Local Aid Estimate Program Summary.

 

 

Election today

I voted before going to work this morning, and I was surprised that there was a steady stream of voters when I was there around 8 AM, making me guess that Medfield will exceed the 15% turnout projected statewide.  15% for us would be about 1,200 voters.

Town Clerk Carol Mayer had set up a slick system to handle the two elections at once that we are doing today, both the state primary and the town election on the DPW’s new garage.  I felt badly for Carol, as we left the annual town meeting (ATM) around 11 PM last night, and she probably opened the polls at 6 AM.

When I arrived, John Harney was the stalwart sole sign holder at the entrance to The Center, with a sign for Stephen Lynch.  I am glad that John has such beautiful weather, which is not the case for our usual town elections at the end of March.  One year I recall that I was glad it was cold enough that it snowed, as if it had been five degrees warmer and had rained instead, then I would have gotten really, really cold.

House added education $ to state budget, but none for Medfield

Per John Nunnari –

Medfield was not one of the communities that benefited from the additional Chapter 70 spending debate.

Numbers stayed the same at $5,797,959 for Chapter 70, and $1,255,070 for Unrestricted General Government Aid.

john

==============

STATE HOUSE, BOSTON, APRIL 23, 2013…. House lawmakers tacked on close to $27 million in additional spending for education and local aid on the first night of debate on a $33.8 billion fiscal 2014 budget Monday, engaging in sporadic debate, including a fiery back-and-forth over in-state tuition for undocumented immigrants.

MMA alert on the state budget

This from the Massachusetts Municipal Association, on the state budget, last week –

Thursday, April 25, 2013

 

HOUSE PASSES FY 2014 STATE BUDGET

AND $300M CHAPTER 90 BILL;

BOTH MEASURES HEAD TO THE SENATE

Late on Wednesday night, the House of Representatives completed three days of debate on its version of the fiscal 2014 state budget, passing a $34 billion budget plan by a 127-29 vote.  The House members also passed a one-year $300 million Chapter 90 bill by a unanimous 155-0 vote.  Both measures now head to the Senate, where the MMA is urging swift action on Chapter 90 to ensure that cities and towns can move quickly on important road projects without losing more of the construction season.

House Approves $34B State Budget Bill

Amendments Add $5M to Chapter 70, $3M to SPED Circuit Breaker, $500K to Regional Transportation, $2.5M to Shannon Anti-Gang Grants

Amendment to Weaken the Public Safety Residency Requirement Rejected

House members spent 3 days sifting through 888 amendments, including many proposals to increase funding for key municipal and education accounts.  With a bottom line that is $1 billion lower than the Governor’s budget proposal, there were many accounts that legislators were interested in expanding.  In the end, however, House members were moderate in adding back additional funding, although there were a number of areas where progress was made.

The budget includes a $21 million increase in unrestricted general government aid, and this key priority was retained in the final version of the House budget with no changes.

Now that the House has completed its work, it is the Senate’s turn to act.  The Senate Ways and Means Committee is expected to release its version of the fiscal 2014 state budget in mid-May, with Senate debate expected during the week of May 20.  After that, the House and Senate will form a conference committee to hammer out a final version to enact before July 1.  Please review the House action outlined below and contact your Senators to highlight important priorities that you need addressed during the budget debate, especially concerning unrestricted municipal aid, Chapter 70, and the key accounts outlined in this and previous MMA Action Alerts.

Chapter 70 Education Aid

Even though the budget proposed by the House Ways and Means Committee provided a $109 million increase to Chapter 70 to fully fund the foundation budget formula and provide a minimum increase of $25 per student to every city and town, the initial allocation of aid did not include implementation of the 2006 reforms to establish a “target share” equity standard, which is one of the major reasons why the aid distribution in the proposed House budget was significantly lower for many communities and school districts than the budget offered by Governor Patrick in January.

With dozens of House members sponsoring amendments to increase the Chapter 70 distribution, mostly to fully or partially implement the target share reforms, Representatives voted to add $5 million more to Chapter 70 to fund a 15 percent phase-in of target share aid.  Because of the complexity of the formula, the distribution of these funds is limited to a small number of communities and school districts, especially those close to their foundation level with a higher-than-average growth in students.

PLEASE CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE LATEST CHAPTER 70 NUMBERS IN THE HOUSE BUDGET  

Special Education “Circuit Breaker”

The House Ways and Means Committee deserves praise for adding $5 million to the Special Education Circuit Breaker account, partially restoring the $11.4 million cut that was imposed by the Governor last December using his 9C powers.  During the debate, House members voted to add another $3 million to the program, resulting in a final House budget that adds $8 million more to the circuit breaker account than in the Governor’s original budget.

Student Transportation Reimbursements

In December, the Governor cut regional student transportation reimbursements by $1 million, lowering the account to $44.5 million.  The House Ways and Means Committee proposed restoring the $1 million, and during the floor debate, Representatives added another $500,000 in funding, to bring the program up to $46 million.  Full funding would require $78 million.

Shannon Anti-Gang Grant Program

The Shannon Anti-Gang Grant Program was funded at only $2 million in the House Ways and Means budget, and during debate Representatives voted to add $2.5 million to the program, to bring it up to $4.5 million.  This account is crucial to assist those communities dealing with very challenging public safety and gang-related issues.  The program is funded at $6.25 million this year.

Representatives Reject Amendment 30, Which Would Have Undermined the Public Safety Residency Law

The MMA strongly opposed Amendment 30, which would have effectively eliminated the statutory 10-mile residency requirement in state law for police officers and firefighters by unilaterally increasing the limit to 35 miles.  Police officers and firefighters are required by law to live within 10 miles of the community in which they work.  Many cities and towns have included residency provisions in their collective bargaining contracts, and this amendment would interfere with those agreements, disrupting the management of their public safety departments.  A majority of communities have not included any residency provisions in their contracts, as the 10-mile range works well for them, and these localities would suddenly face serious management and logistical issues.  The MMA fought this amendment because it would have negatively impacted police and fire departments across the Commonwealth, and Representatives did not adopt the amendment.  It will be important to monitor this issue to block any attempt to add this item during the Senate budget debate in May.

House Unanimously Passes $300M Chapter 90 Bill

In the midst of the final night of its state budget debate, the House unanimously passed a $300 million Chapter 90 bond bill for fiscal 2014, which would boost funding for the local road and bridge program by 50 percent.  The increase – and expedient passage – have long been top priorities of the MMA and local officials statewide.

House and Senate leaders and the governor are all in agreement on a $300 million funding level for Chapter 90 for fiscal 2014 and beyond.  Any remaining debate is over the details of proposals to raise additional revenue for transportation projects. Leaders in the House and Senate have stated, however, that transportation finance bills passed by each branch earlier this month would cover the $100 million increase in Chapter 90. The unanimous House vote last night appears to reflect that assurance.

The Chapter 90 bond bill now heads to the Senate, and we urge local officials to contact their Senators to make sure the legislation receives immediate consideration .  The release of authorizations for the Chapter 90 reimbursement program has been delayed in each of the past two years, causing cities and towns to miss the bulk of the construction season. This year, the MMA and local officials have expressed concerns that Chapter 90 might again be held up by extended State House debates about new revenues and a multi-year transportation package, which is why the association has been pushing hard for a stand-alone Chapter 90 bill for fiscal 2014.

Legislative leaders have been responsive to the MMA’s concerns. When House Speaker Robert DeLeo and Senate President Therese Murray announced a House-Senate transportation finance framework on April 2, supported by the House and Senate Ways and Means and Transportation committees, the plan included a one-year, $300 million Chapter 90 bill as companion legislation. Rep. William Straus of Mattapoisett, House chair of the Transportation Committee, ushered the Chapter 90 bill through the House.

The House adopted one amendment to the bill, which would require cities and towns to use their authorizations from any given year within five years or seek a waiver from the Department of Transportation due to special circumstances. The MMA will be working with the Senate to ensure the workability of the language of this provision.

Swift consideration by the Senate is an urgent priority because the Chapter 90 legislation must go through several additional steps before becoming law and taking effect.  After Senate approval, the bill will need a final vote in the House and Senate, and the bond bill must be signed into law by the Governor.  Then the Legislature will need to pass a “terms” bill to set the terms of the state bond to support the $300 million.  After that measure becomes law, the Governor must then release the full $300 million for distribution.

PLEASE CALL YOUR SENATORS TODAY AND ASK THEM TO PASS THE $300M CHAPTER 90 BILL IMMEDIATELY!! 

CH. 90 LEGISLATION IS URGENTLY NEEDED TO PREVENT ANY FURTHER DELAY IN THE CONSTRUCTION SEASON

New home for Medfield nonprofit news

Announcement from Chris McCue –

Blog: GoodWorksMedfield  (http://goodworksmedfield.blogspot.com)
1st Post: A home for Medfield nonprofit news

Link: http://goodworksmedfield.blogspot.com/2013/04/a-home-for-medfield-nonprofit-news.html

So here’s what it’s about:  a blog specifically for helping our Medfield non-profit and grassroots groups get the word out about all of their “Good Works”. Our community newspapers & Patch do a super job, but I thought having one online location for just local, non-profit news & events would be very helpful and supplement efforts by our well-established media outlets.

I’d love it if you could help me spread the word around town about the blog – especially among our various community groups. In the next day or two, I’ll be compiling an e-mail list of my own local contacts, but given your positions in town, and/or relationships to many of our beloved Medfield nonprofits, I thought I’d start with you first.

All feedback & suggestions on the blog are welcome too!  I do plan on setting up a Gmail account specifically for the blog so that people can send me info. That’s next on my list.

Thanks,

Chris

MEC agenda for this evening

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Medfield Energy Committee

 

April 23, 2013

AGENDA

 

7:30 pm in Town Hall, Chenery Room

 

 

 

 

I.  Accept minutes of last meeting – March 26, 2013

 

II. Update on MEC/Medfield Green Energy Series 2013

            Last talk was on 4/7 –EMFs and Human Health

 

III. Other Events

            Participation in Medfield Green Day at Town Center/Library – 5/4

            Town Meeting –  4/29

 

IV. PV Feasibility at WWTP site

            Any follow-up done after 2/25-site visit and presentations

                                   

V.  Progress on updating Town Energy Use and Reductions since 2008. 

            See MEC letter in annual town reports, updated school numbers, GCA documents

 

VI. Other Business

            Potential Future Activities –

                        GCA designation for 2014

                        Provide support to Capital Planning & Building Committee activities –                                              DPW garage; Police/Fire Station; Hospital Hill site

                        RFP for Solar PPA’s on muni sites

                        Other

 

VII. Set Date and Agenda for next meeting

 

 

 

 

Energy
Committee
Meeting
Minutes
March
26,
2013,
7:30
P.M.
Town
Hall
Present:
Marie
Nolan,
Emre
Schveighoffer,
Cynthia
Greene,
Charles
Kellner,
Osler
Peterson,
and
Michael
Sullivan.
Also
present
was
Adam
Graber,
Jeff
Hyman
and
Ryan
McLaughlin.
Chairman
Nolan
called
the
meeting
to
order
at
7:30
P.M.
Greene
moved
to
accept
the
minutes
of
the
February
4,
2013
meeting,
as
amended.
Kellner
seconded
her
motion
and
the
minutes
were
approved,
unanimously.
Committee
members
discussed
the
March
13th
presentation
by
Dan
Ruben
entitled
“Keep
Your
Lifestyle,
Change
Your
Footprint”
sponsored
jointly
by
Medfield
Green
and
the
Medfield
Energy
Committee.
It
was
agreed
that
there
were
many
useful
ideas
in
the
presentation,
although
some
of
the
suggestions,
such
as
lowering
the
temperature
in
the
home
to
58
degrees,
would
be
difficult
to
do.
The
next
presentation
will
be
on
April
7,
2013
at
the
Harmony
Center
and
will
be
entitled
“EMFs
and
Human
Health”.
Nolan
also
advised
that
Medfield.TV
would
be
holding
it’s
annual
“Volunteer
Appreciation
Day
and
Annual
Meeting
at
7:00
p.m.
on
March
27th
at
the
High
School.
The
library
is
sponsoring
an
event
at
the
Gazebo
on
May
4,
9:00
a.m.

4
p.m.,
to
inform
residents
about
sustainable
activities
and
services
available
in
Medfield.
Graber
and
Hyman
will
try
to
attend
to
answer
questions
and
inform
residents
about
the
work
of
the
Medfield
Energy
Committee.
Nolan
has
submitted
the
Committee
report
for
inclusion
in
the
Town’s
annual
report.
She
noted
that
she
was
not
able
to
find
a
contact
at
Columbia
Gas
of
Massachusetts
to
find
out
what
the
natural
gas
consumption
was
in
Medfield.
Nolan
led
a
discussion
of
the
well-­‐attended
and
very
informative
program
presented
Saturday
morning,
March
23,
2013
by
Bob
McDonald
at
the
wastewater
treatments
plant.
McDonald
had
arranged
for
three
speakers
to
make
presentations
on
photovoltaic
solar
facilities
and
also
gave
a
tour
of
the
plant
at
the
conclusion
of
the
presentations.
Nolan
had
prepared
notes
on
the
presentation
and
distributed
them
to
MEC
members
earlier.
Presenters
included:
1)
Andy
Bakanowski-­‐Mass
Dept.
of
Resource
Management
(discussed
project
management,
i.e.
installation
and
care
of
units
once
on
line),
2)
Rich
McCarthy-­‐
Innovations
Solutions
Engineering
(discussed
third
party
funding
vs.
town
financing,
what
size
solar
farm
we
could
install
on
WWTP
property)
and
3)
Patricia
Arp-­‐Mass
DEP,
SRF
program
(discussed
state
revolving
funds
for
solar
projects,
RFP
grants
and
project
management).
Various
solar
ownership
and
financing
options
are
available
for
the
town,
including
1)
owning
the
facility
outright,
2)
leasing
land
and/or
3)
rooftop
space
to
developers
who
would
pay
for
the
installation
and
sell
the
energy
generated
to
the
Town,
which
in
turn
would
sell
it
to
the
utility
and
get
a
credit
on
its
energy
bill(s).
And
lastly,
the
Town
could
also
contract
with
a
private
facility
for
purchase
of
electricity,
which
is
generated
at
a
facility
on
privately
owned
land,
which
could
be
located
anywhere
in
the
utility’s
distribution
region.
One
presenter
shared
some
considerations
that
would
have
to
be
assessed
before
selling
solar
generated
power
in
MA.
It
is
considerably
more
complicated
to
sell
electricity
offsite,
instead
of
using
it
onsite.
State
utilities
do
not
appear
to
be
anxious
to
purchase
power
from
small
solar
photovoltaic
facilities
and
can
impose
large
connection
charges.
Before
starting,
a
study
has
to
be
done,
paid
for
by
the
facility
owner
and
the
cost
of
this
study
could
run
from
a
few
thousand
dollars
up
to
many
tens
of
thousands
of
dollars.
Also
the
utilities
could
specify
the
route
the
sold
power
would
take
to
be
fed
into
the
grid
and
the
utilities
sometimes
use
this
as
a
way
to
get
the
generator
to
pay
for
maintenance
upgrades
on
their
distribution
systems.
The
feasibility
of
small-­‐scale
hydro
was
discussed
at
the
WWTP
presentation
as
several
other
MA
communities
have
looked
into
this
as
well
as
the
MWRA.
MEC
will
continue
to
research
whether
this
is
possible
at
the
town’s
WWTP.
There
is
concern
that
the
drop
will
not
be
high
enough
to
produce
enough
power
to
make
such
a
project
economically
feasible.
Schveighoffer
wondered
whether
it
made
sense
to
concentrate
on
the
low-­‐hanging
fruit;
undertaking
small
energy
conservation
projects
that
reduced
our
energy
consumption
rather
than
trying
to
build
generating
capacity.
Nolan
said
that
that
was
what
the
town
has
been
doing
and
as
a
result,
the
town
had
reduced
its
consumption
by
30%
or
so
since
the
MEC
was
formed
in
2008
and
numbers
have
been
tracked.
She
thought
now
would
be
a
good
time
for
the
Town
to
build
some
type
of
energy
generator,
whether
that
is
solar
or
hydro
or
some
other
technology,
given
installation
prices
have
dropped
and
state
incentives
still
exist.
Schveighoffer
asked
if
the
Town
could
provide
information
on
pumping
rates
for
water
and
sewer
facilities,
monthly
energy
consumption
rates
for
buildings,
and
other
information
that
could
be
used
with
the
billing
information
collected
on
NSTAR.
This
information
could
then
be
used
to
evaluate
how
further
energy
reductions
could
best
be
accomplished.
Kellner
said
that
he
could
provide
such
information
on
school
buildings,
as
he
had
been
keeping
track
of
it
for
several
years.
He
will
get
that
information
to
Sullivan
for
circulation
to
the
rest
of
the
Committee.
Graber
and
McLaughlin
volunteered
to
prepare
charts
and/or
graphs,
based
on
the
information
collected,
showing
what
has
happened
to
the
Town’s
energy
usage.
This
information
by
building/use
was
collected
by
the
MEC
a
few
years
ago
but
should
be
updated
to
the
current
year.
An
energy
baseline
inventory
of
municipal
buildings,
vehicles,
street
and
traffic
lights,
with
a
DRAFT
energy
reduction
plan
(20%
over
5
years)
was
collected
and
prepared
previously
by
MEC,
as
it
is
a
criteria
to
be
a
MA
Green
Community.
Nolan
informed
the
Committee
that
Paul
Hurd,
the
Executive
Director
of
the
Housing
Authority
had
resigned
to
accept
a
full-­‐time
position
with
the
Winchester
Housing
Authority.
She
wondered
what
would
happen
with
the
efforts
of
the
Housing
Authority
to
reduce
its
energy
consumption.
Sullivan
will
contact
Housing
Authority
Chairman
Roberta
Lynch
to
get
an
update
on
the
Housing
Authority’s
plans
on
hiring
a
replacement
and
on
proceeding
with
its
energy
conservation
initiatives.
Graber
passed
around
a
paper
from
the
Rocky
Mountain
Research
Institute
on
energy
reduction
strategies
for
members
to
take
a
look
at.
Greene
mentioned
that
the
Institute
makes
its
research
papers
available
on-­‐line
free
of
charge.
The
Committee
discussed
what
the
goals
of
the
committee
should
be
going
forward
and
will
continue
that
discussion
at
the
next
meeting.
The
next
meeting
was
scheduled
for
April
23rd
at
7:30
p.m.
The
Committee
will
ask
the
Selectmen
to
appoint
Graber
and
McLaughlin
to
the
Committee.
Hyman
would
like
more
time
to
consider
whether
he
wished
to
be
appointed.
On
a
motion
by
Kellner,
seconded
by
Schveighoffer,
the
Committee
voted,
unanimously
to
adjourn
the
meeting
at
9:00
p.m.
Respectfully
submitted,
Michael
J.
Sullivan

Concert at Dwight-Derby House 5/2

From Friends of the Dwight-Derby House, Inc. –

Dwight-Derby House Kicks off First Thursdays
Kitchen Concert Series

Medfield, MA–On Thursday, May 2, from 7:00 pm to 10:30 pm, The Friends of the Dwight-Derby House will be kicking off the summer season with the first of its Kitchen Concert Series featuring Shane Wood and Neil Kruszkowski of the Shane Wood Jazz Trio.

The events, held at the Dwight-Derby House at 7 Frairy Street in Medfield, will be part of “First Thursdays” and will help to raise funds for the next phase of restoration of the house: installation of a working kitchen.

Tickets for this fun and intimate gathering are $25 per person and will be sold at the door. Ticket price includes everything but the kitchen sink: beer and wine tasting provided by Larkin’s Liquors, delicious finger food furnished by The Jeep Grill and superb piano, sax and vocals by the dynamic and talented duo, Shane and Neil, who have been playing jazz gigs for over 20 years.

Join us for good food, good music and a good time.

The Dwight-Derby House will also be open for tours from 4 pm to 7 pm that same day. Come experience colonial history in the heart of Medfield. The house, a National Register of Historic Places property, is a fine example of a mid-century 1700s home resting in a setting that has not been altered much by the ravages of time.

Or simply stop in to pick up unique gifts for the special moms in your life. We carry the best in local and natural products!  Our gifts will help make mom’s day memorable. The gift shoppe will be open from 4 pm to 7 pm.

The Friends of the Dwight-Derby House is a citizen’s group established to support the active use, restoration, maintenance and preservation of this historic property.  Today, it continues to raise funds through grants, individual and corporate donations, and sale of memorabilia. The donation of time, talent and effort by many local volunteers has also contributed to its restoration.

Building Committee agenda for tomorrow AM

PROJECT TITLE: MEDFIELD DPW GARAGE
MEDFIELD POLICE/FIRE & MASTERPLAN
PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE MEETING
Meeting Date: April 18th, 2013
7:30am
Medfield Town Hall, 2nd floor
NEW MEDFIELD DPW GARAGE
1. ZBA update
2. DPW Procurement and Schedule
3. Rebates
4. Project Budget update
5. Open Day/Informational Session
6. Other DPW Business
MEDFIELD POLICE/FIRE & MASTERPLAN
1. Program
2. Design Review
Police/Fire
Dale St North St Masterplan
3. Other Police/Fire Business
GENERAL BUSINESS
1. Approve previous minutes
2. Review bills
3. Next Meeting