Category Archives: Energy Committee

Small businesses get energy saving opportunity

Eversource press release announces energy saving assistance for our town’s businesses –

Eversource Energy : Partners with Medfield to Launch Energy Efficiency Campaign for Small Businesses

 0

09/15/2020 | 02:55pm EDT

Energy company helps business owners identify specific ways to save on building’s operating costs now and in the future

BOSTON September 14, 2020 – Eversource is working with Medfield next month on the Main Streets energy efficiency initiative to help local, small businesses reduce their energy costs, save money and have a positive impact on the environment. From September 14th until September 18th, energy experts from Eversource-approved contractor, Rise, will be in the community meeting with businesses, scheduling no-cost energy assessments and answering questions about energy-efficient equipment upgrades and improvements.

‘Energy efficiency provides businesses of all sizes with a competitive edge and directly impacts their bottom line through energy savings,’ said Eversource Vice President of Energy Efficiency Tilak Subrahmanian, ‘Many small businesses are facing financial hardships right now, and this effort will help connect small business owners with ways to save on their energy costs.’

Medfield is one of 15 communities chosen for this initiative in 2020. In 2019, Eversource visited nine communities and helped small business owners reduce their energy use by more than 2.7 million kWh and save more than $400,000 as a result of this initiative.

The Main Streets energy efficiency program begins with a no-cost, no-obligation energy assessment identifying energy-saving opportunities for small businesses, such as new lighting, occupancy sensors, programmable thermostats, refrigeration controls, insulation and more. Some of the improvements, such as installing aerators and spray valves, happen on the spot at no cost to the customer. Larger improvement projects, like HVAC equipment upgrades or the installation of energy-efficient motor controls, are scheduled for a future date. For a limited time, Eversource has increased incentives for a range of energy-efficiency improvements to further offset the cost of upgrades, and interest-free financing is available for any remaining costs.

Local, licensed electricians contracted by Eversource will complete approved projects, ensuring minimal disruption to daily business operations. All contractors are required to follow state-of-the-art health and safety guidelines to minimize the spread of COVID-19, and all high-efficiency products installed as part of the program will include warranties for both materials and labor.

Eversource has delivered postcards with more information about the program to Medfield businesses. For more information about the program and to schedule a free assessment at a convenient time, businesses should contact Eversource’s contractor, Rise, directly at 401-784-3700 x 6158.

Medfield awarded $139,316 in GCA grant

Email from the Medfield Energy Committee Chair, Fred Davis –

Announced today: Medfield is being awarded $139,316 in Green Communities funding from the Massachusetts Dept. of Energy Resources.

Congratulations and appreciation to Director of Facilities Amy Colleran, and MEC members for all the work the grant application entailed.

Leveraged with expected utility incentives of $28,858, the effort will result in a total funding of $168,174 for energy-efficiency projects.

All the work will be done at no cost to the Town.

This is the first Green Communities funding that Medfield has applied for since its initial funding as a Green Community. The initial round of projects involved upgrading to LED lighting in Town buildings, along with upgrade of the Blake Middle School controls system.

Most of this next work will involve upgrading two other control systems in the schools. Additional measures involve lighting, gas traps, weatherization, hot water.

The projects are expected to bring about reductions in greenhouse gases: gas and electricity consumption to decline by 2,107 MBtu/year, with about 3/4 of that being reduction in gas heating.

Dollar savings are projected at $41, 286 each year.

In addition, $13,490 of the funding is allocated for professional development and administrative support.
— Fred Davis
Chair, Medfield Energy Committee

——– Forwarded Message ——–

Subject:FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Baker-Polito Administration Awards $13 Million in Green Communities Grants
Date:Thu, 27 Aug 2020 14:39:16 +0000
From:Brown, Kelly (ENE) <kelly.brown@state.ma.us>

Good morning Green Communities,

Below is the Competitive Grant 2020 press release announcing $13 Million in grant awards to 103 communities. Over the next week you will receive more information from the Green Communities Division on next steps. Congrats to all the awardees!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 27, 2020
CONTACT
Eric Noreen
Eric.Noreen@mass.gov
Baker-Polito Administration Awards $13 Million in Green Communities Grants
103 Communities Receive Funds for Energy Efficiency and Clean Energy Projects BOSTON – The Baker-Polito Administration today awarded $13,000,558 in Green Communities competitive grants to 103 municipalities across Massachusetts to fund clean energy projects. With today’s announcement, the Department of Energy Resources (DOER) has awarded over $136 million to Green Communities in Designation Grants and Competitive Grants since 2010. “The Green Communities program continues to make significant progress in helping municipalities reduce their carbon footprint and save on energy costs,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “Our administration is committed to supporting clean energy and energy efficiency efforts that make the Commonwealth’s cities and towns cleaner, healthier, and more affordable places to live.” “As we work to meet our net zero by 2050 emissions goals, the Green Communities program gives our dedicated municipal partners the resources they need to continue making progress in increasing energy efficiency and lowering energy costs,” said Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito. “We look forward to seeing the continued growth in energy innovation and energy savings that these grants will enable in towns and cities across the Commonwealth.” Under the Green Communities Act, cities and towns must meet five criteria to be designated a Green Community and receive funding. 271 Massachusetts cities and towns have earned the Green Communities designation, which accounts for 84 percent of the Commonwealth’s population. This ninth annual round of DOER Green Communities competitive grants is awarded to existing Green Communities that have successfully invested their initial designation grants and previous competitive grant awards. The grants provide financial support for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects that further the designated communities’ clean energy goals. Grants are capped at $200,000 per municipality. Funding for these grants is available through proceeds from carbon allowance auctions under the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI). “The Green Communities program helps cities and towns make important investments at the local level to combat climate change by reducing emissions,” said Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary Kathleen Theoharides. “Air-source heat pumps, ventilation system upgrades, and electric vehicle charging stations are just some of the exciting new projects that these grants will fund in order to increase energy efficiency and clean energy innovation in municipalities across the state.” “Municipalities play a crucial role in achieving the Governor’s ambitious net zero by 2050 emissions target,” said Department of Energy Resources Commissioner Patrick Woodcock. “Today’s announcement is a testament to the hard work and dedication of both the Green Communities team and the many hardworking and dedicated municipal partners across the state who successfully implement these projects that lower energy costs and provide long-term greenhouse gas savings.” The grants announced today fund a range of projects from ventilation system upgrades and high efficiency lighting to the installation of insulation and energy management systems at municipal buildings and facilities. Also included are the installations of air-source heat pumps, hybrid police cruisers, and electric vehicle charging stations. The following municipalities received grant awards: 

. . . Medfield $139,316 . . .

  All Green Communities commit to reducing municipal energy consumption by 20 percent over five years. These commitments amount to collective savings of 2,534,787 MMBtu, energy use equivalent to heating and powering nearly 20,000 homes and reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 233,640 tons, equivalent to taking over 45,000 cars off the road. For additional information on awarded projects and funding amounts, please see here.

MEC 8/24

Your Medfield Energy Committee has tons of irons in our local fires – Zoom in next Monday at 7 PM to hear and see what is happening

  • Medfield Environment Action – new group
  • Community Aggregation – for next town meeting
  • Climate Goals – for next town meeting
  • Solar Projects – e.g. Kingsbury Club solar is large enough to be a power plant
  • New Dale St. School – building to net zero can save the town money
  • Green Community Act – (Municipal) Operations – how state grants are being used to make our town better

The agenda and Zoom link are below:

TOWN OF MEDFIELD
MEETING
NOTICE
Posted in accordance with the provisions of MGL Chapter 39 Section 23A, as amended
Due to the COVID-19 emergency, this meeting will take place remotely. Members of the public
who wish to view or listen to the meeting may do so by joining via the web, or a conference call.
1. To join online, use this link:
a. https://zoom.us/j/98488657066?pwd=U1FsZVR5SFYzRlV5bmRwdENBVlBxdz
09
b. Enter Password: 221674
2. To join through a conference call, dial 929-436-2866 or 312-626-6799 or 253-215-8782
or 301-715-8592 or 346-248-7799 or 669-900-6833
a. Enter the Webinar ID: 984 8865 7066
b. Enter the password: 221674
Medfield Energy Committee
Board or Committee
PLACE OF MEETING DAY, DATE, AND TIME
Remote Meeting held on Zoom Monday, August 24, 2020 7:00 pm
1. Report from the Chair – Fred
2. Approval of minutes from past meeting: 7/20 – Penni
3. Committee Roster update – Cynthia
4. Medfield Environment Action – Megan
Community Forums: CCA, Climate Goals
5. Community Aggregation – Megan / Bob / Paul / Jeremy
a. Warrant Article – wording
b. Jul 22 Public Forum, other publicity
Posted:
6. Climate Goals – Jim
a. Warrant Article – wording
b. GHG Inventory tool – Hilli
c. Aug 17 Public Forum, other publicity
7. Solar Projects – Penni
a. PPA vs ownership; SDA
b. Kingsbury Club: zoning
c. DPW roof: grant application – Hilli
d. Old landfill
e. Other sites
8. New Dale St. School – Alec
a. Arrowstreet: Acton-Boxborough
b. Eversource funding available (Cullinane; Thornton Tomasetti?)
c. BoS support of NetZero goal
d. Sandeen analysis tool – Megan
9. MassEnergize – joint MEA-MEC meeting
10. MSH Subcommittee: MSH Development Committee activity
11. Municipal and Community Partnership with Eversource – Tricia
12. Liaison with other orgs: MCAN, CRGC, MAPC, IECC
13. Medfield Long-Range planning process – Cynthia
14. Green Community (Municipal) Operations – Amy
a. 2020 Green Communities Funding-- $139,316 applied 5/1; answered q’s 6/19
b. Exterior and Interior lighting controls at High School, Middle School
c. High School: Trane / ESPO / interval data / scoping study – Alec
d. MAPC Regional Energy Planning Assistance Funding – Paul
$2500: Help prep, complete annual report
$1500: Competitive grant prep
e. Consumption during shut-down?
f. LED Streetlights: invoices adjusted
g. Energy Management function: Susan McPhee to be invited to BoS
And, any additional business that came in after the deadline that must be discussed prior to
the next meeting.

Medfield climate goals forum at 7:30 on 8/17

From Helen Dewey of Medfield Environment Action –

CLIMATE GOALS:
Think Globally, Act Locally
Learn more at the
Virtual Community Forum
Monday, August 17th at 7:30pm
hosted by Medfield Environment Action
and Medfield Energy Committee
• What are climate goals?
• Why are they important for Medfield?
• How does Medfield align with MA climate goals?
• What would the development of a Net Zero Action Plan
for Medfield entail?
Climate Goals for Medfield will be a Warrant Article
to be voted on at Town Meeting in the fall (date TBD)
Monday, August 17th at 7:30pm via Zoom
Registration required
Register via email at MEAMedfield@gmail.com

Guest Column: Why pursuing a net zero school building for Medfield makes sense

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Guest Column: Why pursuing a net zero school building for Medfield makes sense

At its meeting on June 2, the Medfield Board of Selectmen listened to an intriguing presentation from Mark Sandeen, a member of the Select Board in Lexington. In February, Lexington had opened its new Hastings Elementary School as a net-positive building: an all-electric building that uses no fossil fuels and that generates more energy than it consumes in its operation. Mr. Sandeen had been invited by Fred Davis, chair of the Medfield Energy Committee, to be part of a presentation by the MEC to the Board of Selectmen. The MEC asked the board to charge the MEC and Arrowstreet, the Dale Street Planning Committee architectural firm, to figure out together whether a new school building for Medfield could be constructed as a fossil fuel-free building, at a total lifecycle cost that equals (or is less than) that of a more conventional building.

In his introductory remarks, Fred Davis pointed out that this is already proven technology, implemented in a number of schools in Massachusetts.

As Mark Sandeen explained, the Hastings School is an 110,000-square-foot elementary school building that is going to house 645 students on a regular basis, the second (and larger) of two net-zero school buildings now operating in Lexington. Several features enable the building to produce more than enough energy to meet its own needs: a tight envelope reduces those needs by 50%; in addition to solar panels on the roof, solar canopies were erected on the parking lots around the building. An electric heat pump will move heat from the ground during the winter months, and it will cool the building during the summer by pumping heat out of the building back into the ground. The annual energy needs of the building were calculated at 970,000 kilowatt hours of electricity; the solar installations on the rooftop and the canopies are projected to produce 1.1 million kilowatt hours per year. An extensive battery system was installed to lower peak demand in the building.

An additional benefit of this design is that the Hastings School is the healthiest school building ever erected in Lexington; increased and improved air circulation creates an environment that is most conducive to student learning.

The Lexington facility will, on an annual basis, produce more energy than it consumes. The net-zero-energy features, along with incentives from the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources, provide substantial net dollar benefits to the town from Day One. Under a worst-case scenario (if revenue is lower than expected and expense higher than expected), Sandeen projects a net income to the town (annual dollar benefits exceeding annual bond payment) in the range of $30,000. Under moderate conditions, the projection of net benefit goes up to around $100,000/year.

Mr. Sandeen’s talk is available as part of the video taken of the Selectmen’s meeting on June 2, which has been posted on YouTube by Medfield TV (the MEC presentation begins at 57.53).

As Medfield’s project is just entering the design phase, this is the perfect time to think about making the Dale Street School an all-electric Net Zero building. At the end of the presentation, the Selectmen were definitely interested in the concept and charged the MEC and Arrowstreet with creating scenarios informed by Mr. Sandeen’s presentation.

The MEC is working on a number of fronts to reduce carbon emissions in Medfield. If you would like more information or to help with these efforts, contact Fred Davis, MEC chair.

Fritz Fleischmann is a resident of Spring Street.

MEC – make new Dale Street School net zero

RESOLUTION OF MEDFIELD ENERGY COMMITTEE
RE DALE STREET SCHOOL
ADOPTED 5/21/20

We highly recommend that the Dale Street Committee move forward to
make this project net zero carbon emissions.

Constructing a new building for zero fossil fuels must be done now, or
systems will have to be reconfigured at very high expense in the not too
distant future. Medfield is planning Dale Street for the town’s future so we
must incorporate a net zero goal at this time.

Governor Baker has committed to a close-to-net zero carbon emissions in
2050 for all of Massachusetts. The time is now to make this commitment in
Medfield and to design for the future.

By this document MEC is showing that other communities have made a
commitment to Net Zero buildings, and that many new schools are
explicitly modeling for this objective.

As options are reviewed with costs, financing, incentives, and energy
expenses projected, we are optimistic that, as has been demonstrated in
other towns, Medfield can construct a net zero building at a very
reasonable net cost, or even net profit. This is an exciting time for
innovation in this field and making this happen will require many in the
community to learn about new technology. Doing this for this large and
important school construction project will allow Medfield to take a major
first step in moving toward a net zero footprint.

Please let us know where and when we can further discuss this topic and
when this commitment can be included in the planning for Dale Street and
how it will be evaluated.

The MEC stands ready to help research and support this component of the
project.

The Climate Issue: Less Inconvenient, Not Impossible

Fred Davis chairs the Medfield Energy Committee and his “guest column” that follows appeared in the Medfield Press

Fred davis

Medfield Guest Column: The Climate Issue: Less Inconvenient, Not Impossible

By Fred Davis

Medfielders can appreciate the difficult questions young people here and everywhere are asking: Why aren’t adults responding adequately to the climate emergency?

On Friday, Sept. 20, the Global Strike will involve millions of people worldwide; perhaps you or your child will be walking out of school or work.

For decades to come, there will be no answers that can entirely satisfy the accusations. But right now, a starting point should be an honest recognition that all carbon pollution in the world is an accumulation of all individual carbon footprints. Virtually every person in Medfield shares a significant responsibility in the cause, and therefore, also in the cure.

“Inconvenient” was how Al Gore shrewdly characterized this problem 13 years ago. Developments since then have made de-carbonizing more and more achievable, especially here in Massachusetts, the number one state in the country in energy efficiency (for eight years running, ACEEE).

A consensus has now crystallized among professionals as to what the necessary path looks like. Most if not all steps on the path are available right now, and are usually profitable. Drivers must drive electric. Available roofs must be solarized. Building owners must seal/insulate (to “passive house” standards), and upgrade lighting (to highest efficiency LED with controls). These steps are a whole lot less inconvenient than even a couple of years ago.

Most impactful is to “electrify” existing heating systems: replacing gas and oil boilers and furnaces with high-efficiency electric heat-pumps. Also, any new construction / rehab today must have a carbon footprint that is at least net-zero.

The bottom line is that steps necessary on the path to respond adequately to the climate crisis are, here and now, the responsibility of everyone who drives or lives or works in our town.

Davis is a 40-year veteran of the energy efficiency field. He is the new chairman of the Medfield Energy Committee, which over 10 years had reduced municipal energy use by 44 percent. All views are his own.

LED lights in all schools

Facilities Director, Amy Colleran, shared in advance of the Medfield Energy Committee meeting this evening that the schools are replacing all lights in all school buildings to effect an annual $123,000 estimated energy savings.  The cost to do the swap is 100% paid for by Eversource grants.

This is the projected savings for the Medfield High School, our biggest building.

Financial Summary Energy Conservation Measure PROJECT TOTAL COST Estimated Incentive CUSTOMER COST ROI AC & Maintenance Savings SIMPLE PAYBACK (YEARS) Estimated Annual Energy Savings ($) Lighting $88,334.00 $88,334.00 $0.00 0% $14,670 0.0 $41,142.00 Total $88,334.00 $88,334.00 $0.00 0% $14,670 0.0 $41,142.00 $4,651.00 Monthly Cost of Delay KWH SAVINGS 242,014 Town of Medfield High School $0 $100,000 $100,000 $200,000 $200,000 $300,000 $300,000 $400,000 $400,000 $500,000 $500,000 $600,000 $600,000 Year 1Year 1Year 1 Year 1 Year 2Year 2Year 2 Year 2 Year 3Year 3Year 3 Year 3 Year 4Year 4 Year 4 Year 4 Year 5Year 5Year 5 Year 5 Year 6Year 6Year 6 Year 6 Year 7Year 7Year 7 Year 7 Year 8Year 8Year 8 Year 8 Year 9Year 9Year 9 Year 9 Year 10Year 10Year 10 Year 10 10 Year Energy Savings 10 Year Energy Savings10 Year Energy Savings 10 Year Energy Savings10 Year Energy Savings 10 Year Energy Savings 10 Year Energy Savings

Savings at the Blake Middle School are about $25,000/year, $15,000 at Memorial and Wheelock, and $13,000 at Dale Street.

LED streetlights are in

LED streetlight

It is done! The town now has new LED streetlights and also owns those new LED streetlights, that Facilities Director, Amy Colleran, just had installed.  Payback from the energy savings was less than three years, from memory, given that the town used a state grant to make it even more economical to do.

The notice from Amy below received just now –

******************************************

As of yesterday, all the new streetlight have been installed. The project is complete.

Amy Colleran

Director of Facilities

Town of Medfield

Medfield Energy Committee from 2/28

MEC

Approved as amended, April 30, 2019.

Medfield Energy Committee Minutes for February 28, 2019

 

Attendees: Pete Peterson, Fred Davis, Paul Fechtelkotter, Cynthia Greene.

Meeting was chaired by Fred in Lee’s absence.

  1. The meeting began with a moment of silence to honor Mike S.
  2. Minutes of previous meeting were approved as submitted.
  3. Green Communities report

Amy wasn’t able to attend the meeting but conveyed that she expected to begin working on the annual report during the 1st week of March.  Her immediate focus is on providing the documentation required to receive money for the grants that were previously approved .  The committee agreed that it was imperative that either Amy or someone else from the town administration (similar to what Jerry M used to do before leaving) needs to attend the meetings on a regular basis.

Actions

  • Pete to reach out to Kristine to her direction as to who from the town administration will attend each meeting.
  • Fred to reach out to Amy via email to arrange meeting in March to assess progress and address questions.
  1. LED

Fred stated that the LED fixtures were on order. There were changes in fixture pricing, service costs, projected energy savings and rebates from the original financial case. However, the combined effects resulted in a more positive financial outlook that the original case.

Actions

  • Pete will reach out to George on the costs of adding a new fixture around the Pfaff Center to cover an existing dark spot.

 

  1. Following up on Kelly Brown’s suggestion for a conference call with DOER on development of Medfield State Hospital (MSH)

 

Actions

  1. Pete Peterson will check with Sarah Raposa to determine the Development Committee’s status on review of the responses to the RFI submissions and next steps. Where and with whom can MEC insert a vision/requirements for energy and the development.
  2. Ask Sarah Raposa if she would like to be on the call with DOER
  3. Doodle poll for a meeting with MEC, Sarah Raposa (if she agrees she would like to be on), Ian Finlayson, Paul Ormand, Kelly Brown. Agenda for the call
  • Energy efficient development. Standards to suggest minimum of 55 HERS, adding EUI into the architectural bids,
  • PV ready, solar orientation, and EV charging stations.
  • Potential for microgrid and Municipal Energy Technical Assistance grant for feasibility of a microgrid .
  1. Pete will ask Kristine Trierweiler if it is in Amy Colleran’s job description that she participate in the              energy committee and if not ask that it be added.
  2. Energy in the townwide master plan

Pete and Cynthia are both on the master plan committee that kicked off on 2/27/19.   Cynthia will be searching other town master plans to see if they include any energy visions.  We could consider a net zero goal.  Fred discussed the Boston energy plan that was recently released and how it relies on deep retrofits and going to electrification.  Fred is also interested in finding out if MAPC could help us in developing a mitigation plan much like they assisted in the development of a climate adaptation plan.

Actions:

  1. Cynthia will send the green communities plan to Sarah Raposa to include in the documents to be considered as background information in the master plan.
  2. Fred will contact Camy Peterson at MAPC to see if they do any mitigation planning for communities.
  3. Next meeting we will discuss an energy forecast and vision for Medfield into the future.

 

  1. Ground mounted solar at 120 N Meadows.

Fred talked to Haskel at SDA and he said that the SMART solar program https://www.mass.gov/solar-massachusetts-renewable-target-smart could be used if the town owned the land.  Then the town could put solar on the land and be the consumer of the energy produced.  The town would need to have enough energy consumption to offset the solar production.  We need to determine if there is at least 4 acres with no wetlands included and access to the site that does not cross a wetland.   Then a feasibility study would have to be done (SDA could do).  Other towns that have done this are Lincoln, Swansea, Cambridge and Beverly.  There is time urgency in that the SMART program is under review and there could be additional land use restrictions added.   Pete also wondered if there may be other town land we should consider – behind Wheelock that an investor at one time wanted to use for PV, West street by the railroad tracks that is currently wooded, school parking lots such as Wheelock.   We also asked about the status of the solar canopy between the high school and the middle school.

Actions:

  1. Pete to speak with Dave Strimus to see if he would give/sell the land to the Town
  2. Leslie Willett from the Town would then have to see if there are 4 acres available without wetlands or crossing wetlands that could be used.
  3. For the next meeting agenda – possible town owned land for solar and status of the canopy.
  4. COA Lighting issues.

Fred was asked to assist in why the COA lighting around the building and parking lot is too dark.  After trying to determine what could be the issue – possibly that the Kingsbury Club added lighting. Andrew had contacted him for advise on swapping out of the light bulbs  at the COA and the parking lot across the street from the Town Hall and upgrading them to corn cob LEDs.  He has an email chain with Andrew on this topic.  Fred had counseled Andrew not to do a replacement without changing the fixtures, but Fred believes Andrew did the bulb swap and does not know what light bulbs Andrew put in.  These bulbs could be dimmer, incompatible, of lesser quality and /or  deteriorating light quality.

Actions:

  1. Fred to try and determine what is there now and possibly suggest a study of what fixtures are needed or possibly what bulb replacements might fix the problem.
  2. Historical society audit.

Fred, Marie and Cynthia gave David Temple advise on what to look for in the audit.  The society is looking into an audit after they paid $11 K for an oil burner replacement.  We do not know if it happened.   Pete said the BOS voted to pay their water bill as it is a town building.   The society pays all other costs.

Action:

  1. Cynthia will contact David Temple to find out if the audit happened.
  2. Statewide Sierra Club municipal climate summit on March 16.

Topics include renewable energy, local solutions and advocating.  The committee decided this was not a conference we had to participate in.  Fred also recommended a NEEP newsletter on climate.  Here is their site https://neep.org/news.

Next meeting.  We discussed 3/21 and 4/4 and a desire to have a standard time.   Cynthia will put out a doodle poll.

Meeting adjourned 9:20 pm

Minutes respectfully submitted by Paul Fechtelkotter and Cynthia Greene