Office Hours this Friday 9-10AM

office hours sign

Selectman Office Hours this Friday 9-10AM

My regular monthly selectman office hours are at The Center on the first Friday of every month from 9:00 to 10:00 AM (this Friday).

Residents are welcome to stop by to talk in person about any town matters. Residents can also have coffee and see the Council on Aging in action (a vibrant organization with lots going on).

I can be reached via my cell phone at 508-359-9190 or my blog about Medfield matters, where any schedule changes will be posted.

Tier 5 now – hand held hose use now prohibited

Water Conservation Restrictions

Current Water Conservation Status: Tier 5 – All nonessential outdoor water use (including watering with a handheld hose) is prohibited, due to the current drought status in our region. All residents and businesses are encouraged to reduce their water use. 

Medfield is now subject to a Tier 5 water use restriction due to the ongoing drought in our area. The state has declared a Level 3 – Critical Drought for the Southeast Region, which Medfield is a part of, and requires a Tier 5 water restriction. All nonessential outdoor water use is prohibited. More information about the state’s drought declaration is available here: https://www.mass.gov/info-details/drought-status  

Thank you for your cooperation and understanding. If you have any questions, please contact the Water Department at 508-906-3004 or by email to mgoulet@medfield.net 

Information about Water Restrictions:

When elevated restrictions are in place, nonessential outdoor water uses that are subject to mandatory restrictions include: 

  • Irrigation of lawns via sprinklers or automatic irrigation systems; 
  • Washing of vehicles, except in a commercial car wash or as necessary for operator safety; 
  • Washing of exterior building surfaces, parking lots, driveways or sidewalks, except as necessary to apply surface treatments such as paint, preservatives, stucco, pavement or cement. 

The following uses may be allowed when mandatory restrictions are in place: 

  • Irrigation to establish a new lawn and new plantings during the months of May and September;
  • Irrigation of public parks and recreational fields by means of automatic sprinklers outside the hours of 9am to 5pm; 
  • Irrigation of lawns, gardens, flowers and ornamental plants by means of a hand-held hose, except during a Tier 5 restriction.

Water uses not subject to mandatory restrictions are those required: 

  • For health or safety reasons; 
  • By regulation; 
  • For the production of food and fiber; 
  • For the maintenance of livestock; 
  • To meet the core functions of a business (for example, irrigation by plant nurseries as necessary to maintain stock).

Aura – local preference sign up runs 8/17 to 10/17

From Town Planner, Sarah Raposa –

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Hi all – Local preference opportunities exist for the first lease-up so please spread the word that the lottery for affordable units starts August 17th with applications due 10/17/22. All questions about units, qualifications, and financials should be directed to the lottery consultant. 

Thanks!

Sarah 

For Lottery Information and Applications go to www.sebhousing.com or call (617) 782-6900×1 and leave a message

Affordable Housing Lottery – Aura

Ad_Medfield_Aura_2022 Opens in new window

Aura at Medfield is a brand-new, 56 unit rental apartment community located in Medfield at 50 Peter Kristof Way. There will be 14 affordable apartments ready for occupancy starting in the Summer of 2022. All affordable apartments will be rented to households with incomes at or below 80% of the area median income through this application process. Apartments feature wood-inspired flooring, in-unit laundry, and large walk-in closets. Kitchens offer stainless steel appliances and center islands with quartz countertops. Building amenities include a large entertainment lounge, a communal office area, fitness facility, and a yoga studio. Outdoor amenities include a deck with gas grills, a pizza oven, putting green, and fire pits, as well as an indoor dog washing station and outdoor off-lease play area. The building consists of four floors and has an elevator.

14 units available: 

  • Eight 1 Bedrooms @ $1,908
  • Five 2 Bedrooms @ $2,104
  • One 3 Bedroom @ $2,290

*Rents subject to change in 2023. Rents include the cost of hot water. Tenants are responsible for the cost of all other utilities. There is parking on site.

MAXIMUM Household Income Limits

  • $78,300 (1 person)
  • $89,500 (2 people)
  • $100,700 (3 people)
  • $111,850 (4 people)
  • $120,800 (5 people) 
  • $129,750 (6 people)

Application Deadline: October 17, 2022

Completed Applications and Required Income Documentation must be delivered, or postmarked, by 2 pm on this date. 

Applications postmarked by the deadline must be received no later than 5 business days from the deadline.

Public Info Session: September 14, 2022 at 6:00 pm via Zoom

Go to Zoom.com, Join, or call (646) 558-8656 and enter Meeting ID: 818 9317 7595, Passcode: 088159

Lottery: October 27, 2022 at 6:00pm via Zoom

Go to Zoom.com, Join, or call (646) 558-8656 and enter Meeting ID: 857 2736 5609, Passcode: 276410.

For Lottery Information and Applications, or for reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities, go to www.sebhousing.com or call (617) 782-6900×1 and leave a message or postal mail SEB Housing, 257 Hillside Ave, Needham MA 02494. For TTY Services dial 711. Free translation available. Traducción gratuita disponible.

Aura at Medfield (rental apartments)
50 Peter Kristoff Way, Medfield, MA 02052
(508) 242-5078 
https://www.auramedfield.com/

BAMS at Bellforge Arts Center – 12-7PM on 8/20

From Jean Mineo, Executive Director, Bellforge Arts Center

BELLFORGE ARTS CENTER BRINGS BOSTON’S BAMS FEST TO MEDFIELD

(Medfield, MA): The Bellforge Arts Center and BAMS Fest will present #SOULFULL on Saturday, Aug. 20, from noon to 7 pm. The well-established Boston festival will be bringing six notable artists to Medfield for an all-day music event featuring Tenille Ja’Nae, Ava Sophia, The Undaunted Professor Harp, Jonathan Suazo, D. Ruff, and DJ SavSoul.

“The Boston Art & Music Soul (BAMS) Festival is one of the fastest growing urban arts and music festivals in the City of Boston that celebrates Afro-centric identity and Black artistry, all while amplifying the voices and creative contributions from local, regional and national entertainers of color,” says BAMS Fest organizers.

#SOULFULL will offer not only a great line up of Blues, Soul, Jazz, and R&B artists, but also a variety of food options from Suya Joint, and a full bar featuring Patrón Tequila, all at the site of the new Bellforge Arts Center on the former Medfield State Hospital campus. Free tickets and more information, including musical clips from the artists, can be found online at https://bit.ly/BellforgeBAMSAug. Attendees are encouraged to bring a blanket or lawn chair to enjoy the outdoor concert. Aug. 21 is set as the rain date.

The BAMS Fest Pop Up is one of many free concerts, festivals, and events organized by Bellforge for the summer. For more information about the Bellforge Arts Center, including a schedule of upcoming programs and events, please visit www.bellforge.org.

# # #

The Bellforge Arts Center is a new multi-arts complex being built on the grounds of the former Medfield State Hospital to support artists, expand cultural opportunities, and nurture the creative community. Bellforge currently offers outdoor concerts, festivals, and community events, along with over 200 miles of nature trails and outdoor recreation space. Once fully renovated, the center will also offer visual and performing arts studios, arts education, a 300-seat performance venue, and more.

BAMS Fest is a cultural movement led by Greater Boston Black and Brown artists, culture makers and creative entrepreneurs who are on the front lines of racial equity, spatial justice, and economic empowerment.

Remove Black Swallow Wort before the seeds pods pop

From the City of Newton Conservators – view here to see all images

My black swallow wort seems less effected by the drought than the rest of the plants. I am about three years into a multi year effort to eradicate it all, and I am making progress. This year I pulled my neighbors’ BSW that was not observing the property lines.

Be sure to dispose of the BSW seed pods in the trash, not in the compost. I put mine in a plastic trash bag. It is persistent, but does pull out easily, so persist in pulling it every year.

Black Swallow-wort

August 13, 2020

Identification

Black Swallow-wort is a perennial vine from Europe that emerges in June.   It has somewhat glossy, opposite leaves (i.e. the leaves are in pairs exactly opposite to each other along the vine stem).  It has small purple flowers (starting in June, with new flowers over the rest of the summer), and then develops long seed pods that look like pea pods hanging down.  The pods dry and burst in late summer and seeds are dispersed on white fluffy fibers by the wind.

Characteristics

BSW is our newest invader and a formidable problem.  It clambers up fences, or through shrubs, and if those are not available it simply twines upon itself.  It prolifically grows and seeds in sun or shade.  It is also a threat to Monarch butterflies:  because it is in the milkweed family, they may lay their eggs on it, but because it is not the right milkweed, the Monarch larvae find it inedible and they do not survive.

Control

The spaghetti-like root system spreads with runners, and though individual plants can be dug up and a small infestation can be eradicated, once a larger infestation has taken hold of an area it is very difficult to dig.

Dig up individual plants using a garden knife or digging tool (a “japanese garden knife” is excellent for this).  Dig a couple inches away from the stem down a few inches and try to loosen and pull out the spaghetti like roots.

If pods are on the vine, the pods or the entire plant must be disposed of as trash, not with yard waste, to prevent dispersal of seeds.

If it is not possible/feasible to dig up the plants, at least remove/pull off all the seed pods in mid summer before the pods dry and burst (put the seed pods in trash, NOT yard waste).  You can also pull and break the stem at the base, but still pull off the pods.  The plants will grow again next year, but at least removing the pods prevents innumerable more seeds from being dispersed in the wind.

Links and Resources

For more information on how to identify and control Black Swallow-wort, please refer to the resources below:

  1. Black Swallow-wort flyer for our flyer
  2. Mass Audubon for identification
  3. Michigan Department of Natural Resources for identification and control

Gallery

vine with opposite leaves and spaghetti roots
Black Swallow-Wort
spaghetti-like roots; get as much out as you can
prolific seed pods look like green beans hanging down – get them off before they burst in mid-late summer
burst seed pod filled with many seeds on fluffy fibers dispersed in the wind
last year’s burst seed pod; this year’s flower buds forming

Categories

Invasives

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Invasive plants

Drought now Level 3-Critical – We are told to stop watering!

From: Burney, Danielle (EEA)
Sent: Tuesday, August 9, 2022 3:03 PM
Subject: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Drought Conditions Worsen in CT River Valley, Southeast, and Cape Cod Regions

Drought Conditions Worsen in CT River Valley, Southeast, and Cape Cod Regions

Public is Asked to Continue to Practice Water Conservation Methods

BOSTON —  Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA) Secretary Beth Card today declared the Connecticut River Valley and Southeast Regions will join the Northeast and Central Regions as a Level 3-Critical Drought. The Cape Cod Region will elevate to a Level 2-Significant Drought, and the Islands and Western Regions will remain at a Level 1-Mild Drought. As outlined in the Massachusetts Drought Management Plan, a Level-3 Critical Drought and a Level 2-Significant Drought calls for the convening of an inter-agency Mission Group, which has already began to meet, to more closely coordinate on drought assessments, impacts, and response within the government. Additionally, a Level 1-Mild Drought recommends detailed monitoring of drought conditions, close coordination among state and federal agencies, and technical outreach and assistance to the affected municipalities.

“With the majority of the state now experiencing a Level-3-Critical Drought, it is incredibly important that we all practice water conservation and adhere to local requirements and recommendations in order avoid over stressing our water resources,” said Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary Beth Card. “Efforts to minimize water usage now will help our water systems to rebound more quickly, and ensure that essential public health, safety and environmental needs continue to be met.”

“The continued dry, hot weather has increased drought-related hazards for much of Massachusetts including the risk for fires,” said Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) Acting Director Dawn Brantley. “We need the public to be especially careful during this time by adhering to local water use restrictions, and exercising caution around any outdoor activities that increase the risk of brush and forest fires such as barbecues, campfires, and safe disposal of smoking materials.”

The month of July 2022 experienced minimal precipitation and high temperatures throughout the state. Rainfall was the lowest across eastern Massachusetts, particularly within Cape Cod and Martha’s Vineyard reporting less than an inch of rain, less than 50% of normal precipitation. Within eastern Massachusetts, rainfall totals ranked within the top 15 driest Julys on record with Boston and the Blue Hills experiencing the 4th driest. However, slightly higher rainfall totals occurred across much of central and western Massachusetts, ranging from 50 to 100 percent of normal, as well as on Nantucket. Totals ranged mostly between two and four inches, while some locations in the Springfield area and southern Berkshire County experienced higher totals of four to five inches.

Additionally, the Commonwealth is also experiencing decreasing levels in some reservoirs, dry streambeds, ponding, and diminished extent of streams in many watersheds leading to lack of flow, increased turbidity, higher water temperature, and increase in growth of plants and algae in the water. Groundwater, which is a slow reacting index, is starting to be impacted in many regions. Caution is also advised as fire activity has increased across the state as drought conditions have set in, and wildfires in remote areas with delayed response are now burning deep into the organic soil layers. Drought induced fire behavior can result in suppression challenges for fire resources and result in extended incidents so residents are asked to exercise caution while working with open flames, and to completely drown all campfires out cold.

The agricultural sector continues to also experience drought impacts, such as some depletion of water sources, and production acreage and are irrigating crops on a more consistent basis due to current precipitation deficits, high temperatures, and low soil moisture. Consumers are encouraged to purchase fresh fruits, vegetables, and other products at local farm stands and retail stores throughout the Commonwealth.

The Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) water supply system is not experiencing drought conditions, as defined within its individual plan. Private wells, local streams, wetlands, vernal pools, and other water-dependent habitats located within MWRA-serviced areas are being impacted by drought conditions while water quality in ponds can deteriorate due to lowering of levels and stagnation.

Below are recommendations for communities and individuals living and working within a Level 3 – Critical Drought, Level 2 – Significant Drought and Level 1 – Mild Drought region, including those utilizing a private well. Residents and businesses are also asked to check with their local water system in case more stringent watering restrictions are in place.

For Regions in Level 3 – Critical Drought

Residents and Businesses:

  • Minimize overall water use.
  • Stop all non-essential outdoor watering.


Immediate Steps for Communities:

  • Adopt and implement the state’s nonessential outdoor water use restrictions for drought; Level 3 restriction calls for a ban on all nonessential outdoor water use.
  • Provide timely information on the drought and on water conservation tips to local residents and businesses.
  • Enforce water use restrictions with increasingly stringent penalties.
  • Strongly discourage or prohibit installation of new sod, seeding, and/or landscaping; washing of hard surfaces (sidewalks, patios, driveways, siding); personal vehicle or boat washing; filling of swimming pools.
  • Establish or enhance water-use reduction targets for all water users and identify top water users and conduct targeted outreach to help curb their use.

Short- and Medium-Term Steps for Communities:

  • Establish a year-round water conservation program that includes public education and communication.
  • Implement or establish drought surcharge or seasonal water rates.
  • Prepare to activate emergency inter-connections for water supply.
  • Develop or refine your local drought management plan using guidance outlined in the state Drought Management Plan.

For Regions in Level 2 – Significant Drought

Residents and Businesses:

  • Minimize overall water use;
  • Limit outdoor watering to hand-held hoses or watering cans, to be used only after 5 p.m. or before 9 a.m.
  • Follow local water use restrictions, if more stringent.

Immediate Steps for Communities:

  • Adopt and implement the state’s nonessential outdoor water use restrictions for drought; Level 2 restriction calls for limiting outdoor watering to hand-held hoses or watering cans, to be used only after 5 p.m. or before 9 a.m. If local restrictions are more stringent, continue to keep them in place during the course of the drought.
  • Limit or prohibit installation of new sod, seeding, and/or landscaping; watering during or within 48 hours after measurable rainfall; washing of hard surfaces (sidewalks, patios, driveways, siding); personal vehicle or boat washing; filling of swimming pools.
  • Establish water-use reduction targets for all water users and identify top water users and conduct targeted outreach to help curb their use.

Short- and Medium-Term Steps for Communities:

  • Establish a year-round water conservation program that includes public education and communication.
  • Provide timely information to local residents and businesses.
  • Implement or establish drought surcharge or seasonal water rates.
  • Check emergency inter-connections for water supply.
  • Develop or refine your local drought management plan using guidance outlined in the state Drought Management Plan.

For Regions in Level 1 – Mild Drought

Residents and Businesses:

  • Toilets, faucets and showers are more than 60% of indoor use.  Make sure yours are WaterSense efficient.
  • Limit outdoor watering to one day a week (only from 5:00 pm – 9:00 am), or less frequently if required by your water supplier

Immediate Steps for Communities:

  • Adopt and implement the state’s nonessential outdoor water use restrictions for drought.
  • Limit or prohibit installation of new sod, seeding, and/or landscaping; watering during or within 48 hours after measurable rainfall; washing of hard surfaces (sidewalks, patios, driveways, siding); personal vehicle or boat washing; filling of swimming pools.
  • Establish water-use reduction targets for all water users and identify top water users and conduct targeted outreach to help curb their use.
     

Short- and Medium-Term Steps for Communities:

  • Establish a year-round water conservation program that includes public education and communication.
  • Provide timely information to local residents and businesses.
  • Implement or establish drought surcharge or seasonal water rates.
  • Check emergency inter-connections for water supply.
  • Develop a local drought management plan using guidance outlined in the state Drought Management Plan.

Practicing water conservation now will greatly help reduce water use to ensure essential needs, such as drinking water and fire protection, are being met, habitats have enough water to support their natural functions, and to sustain the Commonwealth’s water supplies in the long-term. State agencies will continue to monitor and assess current conditions and any associated environmental and agricultural impacts, coordinate any needed dissemination of information to the public, and help state, federal and local agencies prepare additional responses that may be needed in the future. Furthermore, the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) will continue to provide technical assistance to communities on managing systems, including emergency connections and water supplies assistance.

“Under current drought conditions, it is critically important that all residents heed their water suppliers’ requests to cut back on nonessential water use,” said MassDEP Commissioner Martin Suuberg. “Cutting back on outdoor water use and following local conservation requirements will help sustain our water sources until precipitation rates can rebound.”

The Drought Management Task Force will meet again on Tuesday, August 23, 2022, at 10:00AM. For further information on water conservation and what residents can do, please visit EEA’s drought page and water conservation page. To get the most up-to-date information on the drought indices, go to the state’s drought dashboard page.

Primary election 9/6

From Marion Bonoldi, Town Clerk –

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The State Primary will be held on Tuesday, September 6 , 2022

Polls will be located at the Council of Aging Center, 1 Icehouse Road and will be open from 6:00 AM – 8:00 PM.  

Vote by mail applications must be completed by August 29, 2022 at 5:00 PM.  All completed vote by mail ballots must be returned to the Town Clerk’s Office or the green drop box on Janes Ave by close of polls (8PM).  No vote by mail ballots will be accepted at the polling location.

In-Person Early Voting

Location : Medfield Town House, 2nd Floor Hearing Room, 459 Main Street

Saturday, August 2711:00AM – 5:00PM
Monday, August 298:30AM – 4:30PM
Tuesday, August 308:30AM – 7:30PM
Wednesday, August 318:30AM – 4:30PM
Thursday, September 18:30AM – 4:30PM
Friday, September 28:30AM – 12:00PM

The VOTES Act signed June 2022

  1. Beginning July 22, 2022, the voter registration deadline for all elections and town meetings will be 10 calendar days before the date of the meeting or election.
  2. Local election officials will still be required to hold in-person registration sessions on the last day to register to vote, which for any Tuesday election will now be a Saturday, but the registration session will end at 5 p.m. instead of 8 p.m.
  3. As in 2020, the Elections Division will be mailing Vote by Mail applications at least 45 days before every regular state primary, state election, and presidential primary. The applications will be sent to everyone registered to vote by the 60th day before the election who has not already applied for a ballot. The applications will be pre-addressed to the local election office and postage pre-paid. Unlike previous years, family members are now allowed to request an early Vote by Mail ballot on a voter’s behalf, as they currently can with absentee ballots. Similarly, family members are now permitted to return an early Vote by Mail ballot for the voter as well.
  4. Changes deadline to apply for vote by mail ballot from 4 days to 5 business days prior to the election.
  5. For most elections, all ballots will still have to be returned by close of polls on Election Day. Beginning with the 2022 State Election, ballots will be able to arrive up to 3 days after Election Day for biennial state elections only. This means that ballots mailed from inside the country can be counted if they are postmarked by Election Day and received by 5 p.m. on the Friday after Election Day. Again, this is only for biennial state elections, which are the November federal elections held in even-numbered years.
  6. Requires early voting in person for presidential primaries, state primaries and state elections.
  7. 150 Foot Rule – Beginning with early voting for the September 6th State Primary, the 150 foot rule prohibiting campaigning around polling places will be extended to early voting sites as well. This means that there shall be no campaigning for or against a candidate or question on the ballot for that election within 150 feet of the entrance to the early voting site during voting hours. Signature gathering of any kind will also be prohibited during the voting hours.

Call Governor to ask he sign the climate bill

Ask the Governor to sign the climate bill –

This summary is from Environment Massachusetts –

Logo
With major climate and clean energy legislation moving through Congress, this is a big week for climate action. And it could get even bigger. In Massachusetts, there’s a bill on Gov. Charlie Baker’s desk that would help make our homes and businesses more energy-efficient and put more electric vehicles on the road. But Gov. Baker only has until Thursday night to act on the climate bill — and he hasn’t said yet whether he’ll sign it into law or veto it. We need to show the governor that there’s broad support for the commonsense climate policies in this bill. Whether you’re a municipal official, small business owner, civic leader, or concerned citizen, your voice can make a difference.

Will you call Gov. Baker today and ask him to sign the climate bill into law?

Here’s the number to call: (617) 725-4005

When you call the Governor’s office, you might speak with a live person or you might be directed to voicemail. Either way, you should keep your message short and sweet. Here’s what you can say:

Hi, my name is _______ and I live in ______ (your town). I’m calling about the climate bill, House Bill 5060. I’m asking Governor Baker to sign this bill into law. [You can add a sentence or two about why the bill matters to you.]

Once you make the call, reply to this email and let us know how it went!

Thanks for taking action. With your help, we can take a big step toward a cleaner, healthier, and safer future.

Sincerely, Ben Hellerstein
State Director P.S. After you call Gov. Baker’s office, share our tweet and help us spread the word!
Wait a minute. This all sounds familiar. Wasn’t there a climate bill on Gov. Baker’s desk a couple of weeks ago?

In a word, yes. The Massachusetts House and Senate passed a climate bill on July 21 with broad, bipartisan support. The following week, Gov. Baker sent the bill back to the Legislature with suggested amendments. Legislators then passed a revised version of the bill, adopting some of the governor’s amendments while rejecting others.

The bill that’s currently on Gov. Baker’s desk reflects a compromise between the governor’s vision for climate legislation and the efforts of House and Senate leaders. This bill would take several important steps toward powering Massachusetts with 100% clean energy. If signed into law, it will:

* Ensure that 100% of the cars sold in Massachusetts are electric vehicles by 2035.

* Allow up to 10 cities and towns to adopt local policies requiring new buildings to use fossil-fuel-free heating and appliances, an important step toward safer, healthier homes and businesses for everyone.

* Require the owners of large buildings — such as offices, apartment buildings, hospitals, and universities — to disclose their energy use each year, in order to help identify the biggest opportunities to improve energy efficiency.

You can help make sure this bill becomes law by calling Gov. Baker’s office today!

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Livington Taylor at Bellforge Arts Center 9/3

From Stacey David, Director of Marketing & Communications, Bellforge Arts Center sdavid@bellforge.org

Livingston Taylor by Mim Adkins 2017

BELLFORGE ARTS CENTER BRINGS LIVINGSTON TAYLOR LIVE TO MEDFIELD

(Medfield, MA): The Bellforge Arts Center is pleased to announce Livingston Taylor Live in concert on September 3, with openers Ash & Eric. Doors open at 3:00 pm, with opening acts starting at 4:00 pm and Livingston Taylor performing at 6:00 pm. General admission tickets are $35. A limited number of VIP tickets, which include a pre-concert cocktail reception with Taylor, are offered for $100. A variety of food and drink options will be available for purchase during the afternoon.

The outdoor concert will be held at the new Bellforge Arts Center on the former Medfield State Hospital campus. For tickets and more information, visit www.bellforge.org/livingston.

Livingston Taylor Live is one of many concerts, festivals, and events organized by Bellforge for the summer. For more information about the Bellforge Arts Center, including a schedule of free upcoming programs and events, please visit www.bellforge.org.

# # #

The Bellforge Arts Center is a new multi-arts complex being built on the grounds of the former Medfield State Hospital to support artists, expand cultural opportunities, and nurture the creative community. Bellforge currently offers outdoor concerts, festivals, and community events, along with over 200 miles of nature trails and outdoor recreation space. Once fully renovated, the center will also offer visual and performing arts studios, arts education, a 300-seat performance venue, and more.

Select Board Office Hours this morning 9-10

Select Board Office Hours this Morning

I hold regular monthly office hours at The Center on the first Friday of every month from 9:00 to 10:00 AM. 
Residents are welcome to stop by to talk in person about any town matters.
Residents can also have coffee and see the Council on Aging in action (a vibrant organization with lots going on).

Bellforge Arts Center COMEDY FESTIVAL 8/13

From the Bellforge Arts Center’s Stacey David, Director of Marketing & Communications, sdavid@bellforge.org

BELLFORGE ARTS CENTER ANNOUNCES VANYALAND COMEDY FESTIVAL

Roger Gordy photo

(Medfield, MA): The Bellforge Arts Center and Vanyaland are pleased to bring you their first ever Comedy Festival, a free event on Aug 13 from noon to 7 pm, showcasing popular Massachusetts comedians Brian Glowacki, Ken Reid, Will Smalley, Nick Ortolani, Emily Ruskowski, Shaun Connolly, Rob Crean, Tiny, Brieana Woodward, Andrew Mayer, and Jason Greenough. 

The Comedy Festival will offer not only a great line up of artists, but also a variety of food options for purchase from ThankQue BBQ, and a full bar featuring Patrón Tequila, all at the site of the new Bellforge Arts Center on the former Medfield State Hospital campus. Free tickets can be found online at https://bit.ly/BellforgeComedy. Attendees are encouraged to bring a blanket or lawn chair to enjoy the outdoor event. The rain date for the festival is Aug. 14.

The Comedy Festival is one of many free concerts, festivals, and events organized by Bellforge for the summer. For more information about the Bellforge Arts Center, including a schedule  of upcoming programs and events, please visit www.bellforge.org.

# # #

The Bellforge Arts Center is a new multi-arts complex being built on the grounds of the former Medfield State Hospital to support artists, expand cultural opportunities, and nurture the creative community. Bellforge currently offers outdoor concerts, festivals, and community events, along with over 200 miles of nature trails and outdoor recreation space. Once fully renovated, the center will also offer visual and performing arts studios, arts education, a 300-seat performance venue, and more.

Vanyaland is an online magazine covering music, film, TV, and comedy for “culture-forward” individuals looking to discover a definitive news, lifestyle, and entertainment source in their city and beyond.