Monthly Archives: August 2019

BoS 9/3

The Select Board meets 9/3, mainly to discuss the zoning for the Medfield State Hospital – the agenda and back up materials are available here – 20190903-agenda & backup

TOWN OF MEDFIELD POSTED: MEETING NOTICE POSTED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROVISIONS OF M.G.L. CHAPTER 39 SECTION 23A AS AMENDED. Board of Selectmen REVISION Board or Committee PLACE OF MEETING DAY, DATE, AND TIME Medfield High School, Room 125 Tuesday September 3, 2019@ 7:00PM AGENDA (Subject to change) 7:00PM Call to order Disclosure of video recording We want to take a moment of appreciation for our Troops serving in the Middle East and around the world Introductions Medfield State Hospital Rezoning Discussion Recap and Refresher on MSH Rezoning Proposal The Rezoning Process I Timeframe Project Proponent Public Outreach Review Tasks and Assignments Adjourn (estimate 9 PM or earlier) Action Items Town Planner Sarah Raposa requests the Selectmen to vote to sign Peer Design Review and Peer Engineering Review for Rosebay Vote to sign MSHDC Environmental Contract Resident Jon Michaeli, 39 Quarry Road; discussion of property damages Finalize and Vote FY20 Town Administrator Goals Licenses and Permits (Consent Agenda) Medfield Coalition For Suicide Prevention requests permission for an art installation in Town to bring awareness to the Suicide Prevention Month of September

Youth Outreach – clinical services questioned

mfi youth & rec

Medfield Youth Outreach – future of clinical services questioned

At the Select Board meeting Thursday night, I was surprised when the Board refused to reappoint the Medfield Youth Outreach Advisory Board, created in 2016, with one member suggesting that it did not even need to be a town board, but could instead operate informally.

Additional surprise came when Kristine Trierweiler reported that the Select Board needed to resolve the future existence of the Medfield Youth Outreach clinical services prior to her posting to hire the new Director of the Medfield Youth Outreach, a position that has been vacant since Dawn Alcott left in the spring.

I am informed that there is still unresolved concern over whether the Medfield Youth Outreach should continue to exist in its current form, namely whether Medfield Youth Outreach should provide clinical counseling services, or whether Medfield Youth Outreach should instead just be referring all counseling clients to services provided by third parties.  Medfield Youth Outreach has been providing clinical services to Medfield’s youth for the past forty years, and a question has been raised as to whether that should continue.

There are reportedly also concerns about potential liability and HIPAA compliance –

  • note 1: any town service can create liability, and therefore the town buys insurance.  Also, both Medfield Youth Outreach employees carried their own insurance as well;
  • note 2: Medfield Youth Outreach has been doing clinical counseling for the forty years of its existence.
  • note 3: any health care worker must comply with HIPAA.

The Select Board had extensive discussions about the Medfield Youth Outreach program at the Board’s June 18 meeting with both the Interim Director of Medfield Youth Outreach and members of the Medfield Youth Outreach Advisory Board. I thought the Select Board had resolved all these MYO issues that night, and that the hiring was proceeding.

All these matters will reportedly be discussed by the Select Board, again, at its meeting on September 17, and hopefully this time a resolution will be reached that allows for the posting and prompt hiring of a new MYO Director.

Nicholas Miliano, Assistant Town Administrator

milano

Good article by Mike Gleason on Nick in the Medfield Press

https://medfield.wickedlocal.com/news/20190829/milano-is-medfields-new-assistant-town-administrator

It was nice to meet Nick at the Select Board meeting last night.

EEE information

I received this information this afternoon from Medfield Board of Health member, Carol Read, who works for the Needham Board of Health –

***************************************************

For the most updated information on EEE risk and aerial spraying, contact the DPH Division of Epidemiology (617) 983-6800 or visit the DPH website at:  www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito  for updated mosquito results, maps and incidence of positive mosquito samples.

https://www.mass.gov/mosquito-borne-diseases

 

For general information on mosquito control, contact the State Reclamation and Mosquito Control Board within MDAR at (617) 626-1723

 

https://www.mass.gov/guides/aerial-mosquito-control-summer-2019 Mosquito control

 

Who do I contact to learn more about aerial spraying in my area?

Your local health department will be aware of any plans for aerial spraying.

Updates will be provided via local media outlets, social media, and other channels.

For questions about aerial spraying, contact MDAR Crop and Pest Services at (617) 626- 1700.

For the most updated information on EEE risk and aerial spraying, contact the DPH Division of Epidemiology (617) 983-6800 or visit the DPH website for updated mosquito results, maps and incidence of positive mosquito samples.

 

www.mass.gov/guides/aerial-mosquito-control-summer-2019

 

2019 Massachusetts Arbovirus Daily Update- Animal and Human confirmation by geographic area

Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus activity has been detected in Barnstable, Bristol, Essex, Franklin, Hampden, Hampshire, Middlesex, Norfolk, Plymouth and Worcester counties. Four human cases of EEE have been confirmed so far this year.

http://www.mosquitoresults.com/

 

Carol Read, M.Ed, CAGS, CPS

Substance Use Prevention & Education

Needham Public Health Division

178 Rosemary Street Needham, MA 02492  Office: (781) 455-7940 (ext. 222)

cread@needhamma.gov   www.needhamma.gov/health/substanceabuse

*****************************************************************

1 Aerial Mosquito Control to Reduce Risk of Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) Summer 2019 Revised 8/19/2019 What is Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE)? Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) is a rare but serious disease caused by a virus that can affect people of all ages. EEE is generally spread to humans through the bite of a mosquito infected with the virus. EEE can cause severe illness and possibly lead to death in any age group; however, people under age 15 are at particular risk. EEE does not occur every year, but based on mosquito sampling, a high risk of occurrence of human cases currently exists. When is aerial spraying of insecticides considered? Truck-mounted ground spraying is already taking place in some communities in Massachusetts. In situations where there is a high risk of human disease, the state’s response plan recommends consideration of the use of an aerial pesticide spray in the evening and overnight hours to reduce the number of infected, adult mosquitoes in the specific areas of high risk. Many breeding areas of high concern are not accessible by truck-mounted ground sprayers. How is aerial spraying conducted? Aerial spraying is conducted by aircraft in areas of concern beginning in the early evening up until 4:30am the next morning. What pesticide product would be used in the aerial spraying? The pesticide used is called Anvil 10+10, a product extensively tested and used in both ground-level and aerial spraying in the U.S. to control mosquitoes. Anvil 10+10 contains two ingredients: Sumithrin and Piperonyl butoxide. Sumithrin is an ingredient similar to the natural components of the chrysanthemum flower which is also found in other pesticide products used indoors, in pet shampoos, and tick control treatments. Sumithrin is rapidly inactivated and decomposes with exposure to light and air, with a half-life of less than one day in the air and on plants. In soil, it degrades rapidly. Sumithrin has proven to be extremely effective in killing mosquitoes worldwide for over 20 years. Piperonyl butoxide (PBO) serves to increase the ability of Sumithrin to kill mosquitoes. The product is registered by EPA and in Massachusetts for this use. It was used in 2 previous aerial applications for mosquito control (2006, 2010, 2012). It is also used by some of the Mosquito Control Projects for ground applications. Are there precautions I should take if spraying will occur in my area? No special precautions are recommended; however, residents can reduce exposure by staying indoors during spraying. Aerial spraying is conducted at night and the active ingredients of the pesticide product used for aerial application for mosquito control generally break down quickly and leave no residue. Although aerial spraying is considered necessary to reduce human risk, it will not eliminate risk. It is critical that residents protect themselves from mosquito bites by staying indoors during peak mosquito hours from dusk to dawn, applying insect repellent when outdoors, draining standing water where mosquitoes breed, and repairing screens in doors and windows. Residents should also take steps to protect their pets from mosquito bites. Are there any health impacts associated with exposure to Anvil 10+10? There are no health risks expected during or after spraying. There is no evidence that aerial spraying of Anvil 10+10 will exacerbate certain health conditions, such as asthma or chemical sensitivity. Can these targeted ground and aerial sprays harm other insects or wildlife? Aerial spraying will be conducted in the nighttime hours, when fish are less likely to be at the surface feeding and honeybees are most likely to be in their hives. Owners should cover small ornamental fishponds during the night of spraying. These fishponds can be uncovered in the morning after spraying has been completed. If I am a beekeeper, should I take special precautions to protect the bees before or after aerial spraying? We do not anticipate negative impacts on honey bee colonies since the aerial spraying will take place at night. If bees are congregating outside the hive box(es), consider applying a cover to the hive entrance or over the entire hive box(es) using a loose wet cloth (burlap, sheet, etc.) to prevent bees from exiting, thus not allowing for direct contact during the application. If miticides have been applied and there is concern about ventilation during covering, consider adding an additional empty box on top to increase ventilation within the hive during the application. Remove covers and additional boxes placed on hives as soon as possible the morning following application. To report signs of acute honey bee mortality defined as larger than normal quantities of dead or dying bees at the entrance or inside hives post application, contact the Apiary Program Message Line ASAP by calling 617-626-1801 Is there a risk to drinking water sources? No. Aerial spraying is not expected to have any impacts on surface water or drinking water. 3 Who do I contact to learn more about aerial spraying in my area? Your local health department will be aware of any plans for aerial spraying. Updates will be provided via local media outlets, social media, and other channels. For questions about aerial spraying, contact MDAR Crop and Pest Services at (617) 626-1700. For the most updated information on EEE risk and aerial spraying, contact the DPH Division of Epidemiology (617) 983-6800 or visit the DPH website at www.mass.gov/guides/aerial-mosquito-control-summer-2019 for updated mosquito results, maps and incidence of positive mosquito samples. For general information on mosquito control, contact the State Reclamation and Mosquito Control Board within MDAR at (617) 626-1723.20190819-MDPH-Short-FAQ-EEE-and-Mosquito-Control-8-19-2019 MDPH_Page_220190819-MDPH-Short-FAQ-EEE-and-Mosquito-Control-8-19-2019 MDPH_Page_3

EEE alert

EMAIL just now from Kristine Trierweiler  –

**********************************************************

We have had a horse that has died and tested positive for EEE. The state has upgraded us from moderate to critical. Attached please find the press release that we have issued.  A reverse 911 call is in the process of being issued.

We have contacted the Department of Public Health and they have denied aerial spraying at this time. Norfolk County Mosquito Control will be in Medfield conducting truck spraying beginning at dusk on Friday evening.

We will continue to update the website as we get more guidance and information from the State.

Kristine Trierweiler

Town Administrator
Town of Medfield

*****************************************************

Medfield EEE Risk Elevated to Critical Following Death of Horse Officials Implement 7 p.m. Curfew for All Town and School Outdoor Activities MEDFIELD -- Town Administrator Kristine Trierweiler, the Medfield Board of Health and Medfield Public Schools Superintendent Jeffrey Marsden report that the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH) has elevated the town's risk for Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) from "moderate" to “critical” on Thursday morning in light of the death of a horse that tested positive for the virus. All Town and Medfield Public Schools outdoor activities, including sports practices, will now end at 7 p.m. and night games will be rescheduled to the daytime or weekends. Norfolk County Mosquito Control has been notified of the new designation and will conduct spraying in Medfield on Friday, Aug. 30, after dusk. The Town is following DPH guidelines and advising all residents to limit outdoor exposure after sundown. Residents should strongly consider cancelling or rescheduling any planned outdoor activities until further notice. "This critical EEE designation is concerning, especially since it has been linked to the death of a horse in town," Town Administrator Trierweiler said. "We will be meeting to discuss what further steps need to be taken and recommend that all residents use caution while outside during dusk and dawn hours when mosquitoes are most likely to bite." According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the EEE virus is a rare cause of brain infections, or encephalitis. There are very few human EEE cases each year but the virus can be fatal or leave victims with serious, lifelong health complications. "Due to the seriousness of this issue, we will be working with the athletic department and our coaches to make sure that all outdoor practices end at 7 p.m. for the time being and will be working diligently to reschedule any night games coming up," Superintendent Marsden said. "The safety of our students is our number one priority and we will be taking all precautions to prevent our students from being outdoors when mosquitoes are at their worst." Town and state officials offer the following important guidelines about EEE and mosquito-borne illness: Avoid Mosquito Bites  Limit outdoor activities during peak mosquito hours. Consider cancelling or rescheduling planned outdoor evening events and activities. The hours from dusk to dawn are peak biting times for many mosquitoes. If you are outdoors at any time and notice mosquitoes around you, take steps to avoid being bitten by moving indoors, covering up and/or wearing repellent.  Clothing can help reduce mosquito bites: Although it may be difficult to do when it’s hot, wearing long sleeves, long pants and socks while outdoors will help keep mosquitoes away from your skin.  Apply insect repellent if you do go outdoors. Use a repellent with DEET, permethrin, picaridin, IR3535 or oil of lemon eucalyptus according to the instructions on the product label. DEET products should not be used on infants under two months of age and should be used in concentrations of 30 percent or less on older children. Oil of lemon eucalyptus should not be used on children under 3 years of age. Permethrin products are intended for use on items such as clothing, shoes, bed nets and camping gear and should not be applied directly to your skin. Mosquito-Proof Your Home  Drain standing water: Many mosquitoes lay their eggs in standing water. Limit the number of places around your home for mosquitoes to breed by either draining or getting rid of items that hold water. Check rain gutters and drains. Empty any unused flowerpots and wading pools and change water in birdbaths frequently.  Install or repair window and door screens: Some mosquitoes like to come indoors. Keep them outside by having tightly-fitting screens on all of your windows and doors. Information about EEE and reports of current and historical EEE virus activity in Massachusetts can be found on the MDPH website here. "Medfield is now one of many communities throughout the region that have been given the critical designation by DPH," said Medfield Health Agent Nancy Bennotti. "We will continue to update residents as needed and ask that they adhere to the 7 p.m. curfew for outdoor activities. If anyone believes they are exhibiting signs of having contracted the EEE virus please seek medical help immediately."20190829-Press Release-EEE_Page_220190829-Press Release-EEE_Page_3

VLPT newsletter, Quiet Voices

The monthly newsletter, Quiet Voices, from the Vine Lake Preservation Trust is always interesting, and I encourage every resident to sign up to receive it.  I could not seem to copy the August newsletter successfully here to share it, but I was able to copy one of the pages from the Vine Lake Preservation Trust website to give you a flavor of what is shared –

 

Copyright © 2019 Vine Lake Preservation Trust                Contact vinelakepreservationtrust@verizon.net

VINE LAKE PRESERVATION TRUST

Medfield, Massachusetts

What Everyone Should Know About…

The Family of Samuel Greenby Marian Pierre-Louis

Find out more about this remarkable African American family of some means who resided in Medfield during the 1800s.

Must Click

From Our House to Vine Lake Cemetery:

Uncanny Connections

by Maria Baler

How a Medfield family came to know their home’s history, the Bent family who lived there, and their burial lot in the cemetery.

 

m of a manse on a VT hilltop runs into tradition, suspicion, cemetery…

Must Know

The Sampson Stones

by Rob Gregg

Perhaps the cemetery’s most intriguing mystery about two perforated stones. What makes these stones so different?

 

m of a manse on a VT hilltop runs into tradition, suspicion, cemetery…

Must Unravel

Missing Medfield Civil War Soldier Found

by George Gray

I became interested in Daniel McMahon, a Medfield soldier who was killed in a battle…

 

Must Find Out

Another Civil War Soldier:

Once Lost But Now Found

by Rob Gregg

From his death on 6 April 1865 at Poplar Grove Church, Virginia to the Spring of 2011, Gabriel Strang was a Civil War soldier…

 

Must Notice

Must Explore

ArticleArticleArticleArticleArticleArticle

The Saga of Cesar Hunt alias Peter Warren

by Rob Gregg

An African American slave who bought his freedom, served in the Revolutionary War, and lived in Medfield. Who is this intriguing person?

 

Must Examine

Article

The Secret Behind Lot 227 Grave 2

by Rob Gregg

What will you discover when an obscure family is brought to light?

 

Must Discover

Article

Early Slaveholders Buried in Vine Lake Cemetery Slave Owners and Vine Lake Cemetery

by Rob Gregg

In early Medfield, a society of slaves prevailed to an unknown extent. prevailed to an unknown extent.  Buried at the cemetery are these town leaders who were slMedfield, a society of slaves prevailed to an unknown extent.  Buried at the cemetery are these town leaders who were slave holders.

 

Must Believe

Article

What We Know About Medfield’s First Murder in 1802

by Rob Gregg

You won’t believe much of what happened with this murder and subsequent grave robbery but it’s truly the way it happened.

 

Must Appreciate

Article

How a Plucky Girl Overcame Frequent Hardships

by Rob Gregg

During the first few years of her life, she was of feeble frame and considered by her mother’s friends to be not worth raising.

 

5 MFD firefighters receive awards

MFD-patch

The Fire Service Commission of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts awarded the following “Massachusetts Firefighter Service Award” to five Medfield Fire Department firefighters for a combined 135 years of service to the Medfield Fire Department –

 

20190826-MFD-service awards_Page_120190826-MFD-service awards_Page_220190826-MFD-service awards_Page_320190826-MFD-service awards_Page_4COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS Fire Service Commission PRESENTS THE Massachusetts Firefighter Service Award TO IN GRATEFUL APPRECIATION AND RECOGNJTION OF YOUR 30 YEARS OF DEDICATED FIRE SERVICE AS A CALL FIREFIGHTER ON BEHALF OF THE CITIZENS OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS THIS 2 DAY OF JANUARY 2019 ~~~ Head of Fire Department State Fire Marshal COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS Fire Service Commission PRESENTS THE Massachusetts Firefighter Service A ward TO IN GRATEFUL APPRECIATION AND RECOGNITION OF YOUR 20 YEARS OF DEDICATED FIRE SERVICE AS A CALL FIREFIGHTER ON BEHALF OF THE CITIZENS OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS TI-HS 1 DAY OF JULY 2017 ~~ Head of Fire Depattment State Fire Marshal COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS Fire Service Commission PRESENTS THE Massachusetts Firefighter Service A ward TO IN GRATEFUL APPRECIATION AND RECOGNITION OF YOUR 30 YEARS OF DEDICATED FIRE SERVICE AS A CALL FIREFIGHTER ON BEHALF OF THE CITIZENS OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS THIS 1 DAY OF JULY 2019 (6:._~ Head ofFire Department State Fire Marshal COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS Fire Service Commission PRESENTS THE Massachusetts Firefighter Service Award TO IN GRATEFUL APPRECIATION AND RECOGNITION OF YOUR 25 YEARS OF DEDICATED FIRE SERVICE AS A CALL FIREFIGHTER ON BEHALF OF THE CITIZENS OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS THIS 1 DAY OF JANUARY 2017 a-~ Head of Fire Department State Fire Marshal COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS Fire Service Commission PRESENTS THE Massachusetts Firefighter Service Award . TO P.bejudjj ~fue/P.bavid ({!J} cffode d#~~ IN GRATEFUL APPRECIATION AND RECOGNITION OF YOUR 30 YEARS OF DEDICATED FIRE SERVICE AS A CALL FIREFIGHTER ON BEHALF OF THE CITIZENS OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS THIS 1 DAY OF OCTOBER 2015 ~-- /.6:--~~ Head of Fire Department State Fire Marshal