Monthly Archives: August 2019

When Insults Had Class AND A SENSE OF HUMOR.

insults

When Insults Had Class AND A SENSE OF HUMOR.

“He has all the virtues I dislike and none of the vices I admire.”
— Winston Churchill
“A modest little person, with much to be modest about.”
— Winston Churchill
“I have never killed a man, but I have read many obituaries with great pleasure.”
— Clarence Darrow
“He has never been known to use a word that might send a reader to the dictionary.”
— William Faulkner (about Ernest Hemingway)
“Poor Faulkner. Does he really think big emotions come from big words?”
— Ernest Hemingway (about William Faulkner)
“Thank you for sending me a copy of your book; I’ll waste no time reading it.”
— Moses Hadas
“He can compress the most words into the smallest idea of any man I know.”
— Abraham Lincoln
“I’ve had a perfectly wonderful evening, but this wasn’t it.”
— Groucho Marx
“I didn’t attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter saying I approved of it.”
— Mark Twain
“He has no enemies but is intensely disliked by his friends.”
— Oscar Wilde
“I am enclosing two tickets to the first night of my new play; bring a friend…if you have one.”
— George Bernard Shaw to Winston Churchill
“Cannot possibly attend first night, will attend second…if there is one.”
— Winston Churchill, in response
“I feel so miserable without you, it’s almost like having you here.”
— Stephen Bishop
“He is a self-made man and worships his creator.”
— John Bright
“I’ve just learned about his illness. Let’s hope it’s nothing trivial.”
— Irvin S. Cobb
“He is not only dull himself, he is the cause of dullness in others.”
— Samuel Johnson
“He is simply a shiver looking for a spine to run up.”
— Paul Keating
“He had delusions of adequacy.”
— Walter Kerr
“There’s nothing wrong with you that reincarnation won’t cure.”
— Jack E. Leonard
“He has the attention span of a lightning bolt.”
— Robert Redford
“They never open their mouths without subtracting from the sum of human knowledge.”
— Thomas Brackett Reed
“He inherited some good instincts from his Quaker forebears, but by diligent hard work, he overcame them.”
— James Reston (about Richard Nixon)
“In order to avoid being called a flirt, she always yielded easily.”
— Charles, Count Talleyrand
“He loves nature in spite of what it did to him.”
— Forrest Tucker
“Why do you sit there looking like an envelope without any address on it?”
— Mark Twain
“His mother should have thrown him away and kept the stork.”
— Mae West
“Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go.”
— Oscar Wilde
“He uses statistics as a drunken man uses lamp-posts…for support rather than illumination.”
— Andrew Lang (1844-1912)
“He has Van Gogh’s ear for music.”
— Billy Wilder

Safe Harbor claimed for Rosebay

The Zoning Board of Appeals of the Town of Medfield notified the Rosebay applicant at the initial August 15 hearing last Thursday that the Town of Medfield was claiming its safe harbor rights, but that the ZBA would still proceed with the hearing to see if the applicant and the ZBA could get to an acceptable compromise on the project that the ZBA can support.

Below is the town’s special counsel’s notice to the Rosebay developer.

BLATMAN, BOBROWSKI & HAVERTY, LLC ------ATTORNEYS AT LAW------ PAUL}. HAVERTY Paul@bbhlaw.net HAND DELIVERED Brian J. McMillin, Manager Newgate Housing LLC 61 Blueberry Lane Westwood, MA 02052 9 DAMONMILL SQUARE, SUITE 4A4 CONCORD, MA 01742 PHONE 978.371.2226 FAX 978.371.2296 August 15,2019 RE: The Rosebay At Medfield - Pound Street, Medfield, MA Notice of Safe Harbor Pursuant to 760 CMR 56.03(8) Dear Mr. McMillin: Please accept this correspondence as formal notification on behalf of the Medfield Zoning Board of Appeals (the "Board"), pursuant to 760 CMR 56.03(8), that the Board has determined that the "Housing Production Plan" Safe Harbor, pursuant to 760 CMR 56.03(4), is applicable to the comprehensive permit application filed by you on July 19, 2019. The Board timely-opened its public hearing on August 15, 2019. Pursuant to 760 CMR 56.05, the Board has fifteen (15) days from this hearing to provide you written notice of any Safe Harbor claims it may have pursuant to 760 CMR 56.03(3) through (7). Please accept this correspondence as written notification that the Town of Medfield has the benefit ofthe Housing Production Plan Safe Harbor pursuant to 760 CMR 56.03(4). Pursuant to a letter of certification issued by the Department of Housing and Community Development ("DHCD") dated June 10, 2019, the Town has a one-year Safe Harbor which commenced on May 10,2019 and which runs through May 9, 2020. A copy ofthe DHCD certification letter is attached hereto as Exhibit 1. While the Board has determined that the Housing Production Plan Safe Harbor is applicable, the provision of such notice does not constitute a determination on the merits of the Project. This notice is provided to protect the Town's rights with regard to the Housing Production Plan Safe Harbor, which would be lost if notice was not provided within the fifteen (15) day period proscribed by the Regulations. The Board remains open-minded about the development that has been proposed, and intends to conduct a thorough review to determine whether legitimate issues of local concern may be adequately addressed through changes to the project design. If you have any questions regarding this correspondence, please feel free to contact me. Cc: Phil DeMartino, DHCD Sarah Raposa, Town Plmmer 2 Commonwealth of Massachusetts DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Charles D. Baker, Governor + Karyn E. Polito, Lt. Governor + Janelle L. Chan, Undersecretary June 10,2019 Mr. Gustave Murby, Chairman Medfield Board of Selectman Town House/ 459 Main Street Medfield, MA 02052 Housing Production Plan- Certification Approved Dear Mr. Murby: The Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) certifies that the Town of Medfield is in compliance with its Housing Production Plan. This certification is effective for a one year period beginning on May 10,2019 to May 9, 2020. This Certification of Municipal Compliance is based on the following findings: 1. Medfield has provided evidence that the required number of units described in its request is eligible to be counted towards certification. 2. The 27 Subsidized Housing Inventory (SHJ) eligible units in this project (Medfield Meadows SHl ID # 10290 meet the number (21) necessary to satisfy a one year certification threshold~ 3. The housing development is consistent with the production goals outlined in Medfield Housing Production Plan. Please note that all units must retain eligibility for the SHJ for the entire certification period. If units are no longer eligible for inclusion on the SHI, they will be removed and will no longer be eligible for certification. This action may affect the term of your certification. I have included an updated list of SHI eligible units. Medfield's current SHI stands at 8.29%. If you have any questions or need assistance, please contact Phillip DeMartino, Technical Assistance Coordinator, at (617) 573-1357 or Phiilip.DeMartino@state.ma.us. Associate Director, DHCD cc Senator Paul Feeney Representative Shawn Dooley Representative Denise C. Garlick Sarah Raposa, Town Planner, Medfield Michael J. Sullivan, Town Administrator, Medfield John J. McNicholas, Acting Chair, Zoning Board of Appeal 100 Cambridge Street, Suite 300 Boston, Massachusetts 02114 www.mass.gov/dhcd 617.573.1100 Medfield DHCD ID# 1890 1891 1892 1893 4360 9953 10062 10063 10221 10222 10290 6/10/2019 DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CH408 SUBSIDIZED HOUSING INVENTORY Bulltw/ Total SHI Affordability Comp. Subsidizing Project Name Address Type Units Expires Permit? Agency Tilden Village 30 Pound Street Rental 60 Perp Yes DHCD Allendale Dale Street Ownership 17 Perp YES DHCD DHCD The Village at Medfield Turtle Brook Way Ownership 6 Perp YES DHCD DHCD ~~------- Wilkins Glen Wilkins Glen Road Rental 103 2042 YES MassHousing DHCD DDS Group Homes Confidential Rental 5 N/A No DDS The Pare at Medfield One Gateway Drive Rental 92 Perp YES DHCD Country Estates 21, 25, & 29 Hospital Rd Ownership 8 Perp YES MassHousing Cushman House aka Cushing 67 North Street Rental 8 Perp YES DHCD House 71 North Street 71 North Street Rental 8 Perp YES DHCD Hillside Village 80 North Meaovvs Road Rental 16 Perp YES DHCD Medfield Meadovvs 41 Dale St Mix 27 Perp DHCD Medfield Totals 350 Census 2010 Year Round Housing Units Percent Subsidized 4,220 8.29% Medfield Page 1 of 1 This data is derived from information provided to the Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) by Individual communities and is subject to change as new information is obtained and use restrictions expire.20190815-BBH-Safe Harbor Notification 08-15-19_Page_220190815-BBH-Safe Harbor Notification 08-15-19_Page_320190815-BBH-Safe Harbor Notification 08-15-19_Page_4

 

The Works

The Town of Medfield celebrated Arbor Day for 2019 by planting trees at The Center in Medfield on Ice House Road. Thank you to COA Director, Roberta Lynch and her staff for their assistance in the celebration. As part of the Town’s “Tree City USA” status, we will be conducting tree planting ceremonies each year on Arbor Day, some plantings will be dedicated to individuals or groups and some just to celebrate the day. All of the tree plantings are to improve the environment and the aesthetics of the area. M E D F I E L D D E P A R T M E N T O F P U B L I C W O R K S ** The DPW presents “THE WORKS”, a quarterly newsletter to inform the residents of Medfield on the happenings of their Public Works Department including updates on projects, current events, and upcoming developments ** Tree Division 1 Misc. Town/DPW Events 1, 2 Employee Spotlight 2 DPW Fun Facts 2 Inside this issue: The Works M E D F I E L D D P W ’ S Q U A R T E R LY N E W S L E T T E R Volume 1, Issue 4 July 2019 Arbor Day Celebration TREE DIVISION: “Electric Time” in Medfield Congratulations to Tom and Brandie Erb and the entire staff of Electric Time in Medfield that have constructed their largest structured clock for a new train station in Thailand. The clock will be disassembled and packed in 3 large crates, shipped to Thailand and then reassembled. The assembly could take 2-3 days. MISC. TOWN/DPW EVENTS: Memorial Day Cleanup Special thanks to the Cemetery staff and the assistance of other DPW division staff members who worked tirelessly to prepare the Vine Lake Cemetery for Memorial Day and the parade through the Town. VOLUME 1, ISSUE 4 During the Spring, the DPW asked for volunteers to help the Town pick up litter within the Town borders. We had many volunteers that came out on that weekend and we were able to collect over 300 bags of litter on roadsides, parking lots, the grounds of public buildings, churches, schools, parks and river fronts etc…. The cleanup effort was in conjunction with “Earth Day” week. We thank all of the volunteers that helped to clean up Medfield and we hope that many others will take the same initiative. Page 2 Employee Spotlight Meet Steve DellaCamera, Groundskeeper II of the DPW Cemetery Division. Steve is part of a dynamic duo that cares for and maintains the Vine Lake Cemetery as well as supporting the Highway Div. in multiple projects throughout the year. He takes great pride in ensuring that all aspects of the cemetery activities are carefully completed, including coordination of funerals. He holds a Class B Commercial Driver’s License as well as a 2A Excavator Hoisting License. He has been with the department since 2015 and had previously owned his own landscape/ construction company for 10 years prior. His experience and considerate personality makes him an asset to the community and an invaluable member of our team. Medfield Clean-up Days DPW Fun Facts DID YOU KNOW?  Medfield is the 43rd town which was incorporated in Massachusetts in 1651.  Medfield is 14.43 square miles in area. For more information or have questions, please contact our main office at (508) 906-3003 or visit our town website @ www.town.medfield.net Medfield DPW Food Drive The Medfield Department of Public Works held a Food Drive during the month of May at the Transfer Station to help support the Medfield Food Cupboard. Touch—A—Truck Also in May, the Medfield DPW went to the Middle School for a Touch -a-Truck event where many kids got a chance to climb on different vehicles and equipment.20190819-The Works July 2019_Page_2

Unfair Feres Doctrine

aaj

My trade group, the American Association for Justice (personal injury attorneys representing injured people), has been trying to get Congress to repeal the unfair Feres Doctrine, which prevents military service personnel from being compensated for any injuries received while they serve.

The issue was on CBS This Morning Show: https://twitter.com/CBSThisMorning/status/1161241128097714176

LED lights in all schools

Facilities Director, Amy Colleran, shared in advance of the Medfield Energy Committee meeting this evening that the schools are replacing all lights in all school buildings to effect an annual $123,000 estimated energy savings.  The cost to do the swap is 100% paid for by Eversource grants.

This is the projected savings for the Medfield High School, our biggest building.

Financial Summary Energy Conservation Measure PROJECT TOTAL COST Estimated Incentive CUSTOMER COST ROI AC & Maintenance Savings SIMPLE PAYBACK (YEARS) Estimated Annual Energy Savings ($) Lighting $88,334.00 $88,334.00 $0.00 0% $14,670 0.0 $41,142.00 Total $88,334.00 $88,334.00 $0.00 0% $14,670 0.0 $41,142.00 $4,651.00 Monthly Cost of Delay KWH SAVINGS 242,014 Town of Medfield High School $0 $100,000 $100,000 $200,000 $200,000 $300,000 $300,000 $400,000 $400,000 $500,000 $500,000 $600,000 $600,000 Year 1Year 1Year 1 Year 1 Year 2Year 2Year 2 Year 2 Year 3Year 3Year 3 Year 3 Year 4Year 4 Year 4 Year 4 Year 5Year 5Year 5 Year 5 Year 6Year 6Year 6 Year 6 Year 7Year 7Year 7 Year 7 Year 8Year 8Year 8 Year 8 Year 9Year 9Year 9 Year 9 Year 10Year 10Year 10 Year 10 10 Year Energy Savings 10 Year Energy Savings10 Year Energy Savings 10 Year Energy Savings10 Year Energy Savings 10 Year Energy Savings 10 Year Energy Savings

Savings at the Blake Middle School are about $25,000/year, $15,000 at Memorial and Wheelock, and $13,000 at Dale Street.

A 1969 review of our first 5 years of implementing the first master plan

The first Town of Medfield master plan was done in 1964, and five years later the stewards of master planning in town looked back at what had been accomplished.

Interestingly, the town voted down in 1967 the recommendation to install a traffic signal at Main and North, but recanted a year later.

Of those named, I only recognize Bob McLeod as still in town.

THE MEDFIELD MASTER PLAN THE FIRST FIVE YEARS 1964 - 1969 The MEDFIELD Master Plan is a tribute to the wisdom and vision of those who, in the Town Meeting of 1962, showed sufficient concern over Medfield's future to authorize the expenditure of $21,000 ($14,000 of which was provided by government funds) for the preparation of such a Plan by Metcalf and Eddy, a firm of civil engineers eminently qualified for this undertaking. Before a blueprint for the future of our Town through 1980 could be proposed it was first necessary to analyze those trends in its past which had shaped its present, and how these trends, without proper provision for their development, would affect all of us in the years ahead. So there followed two years of exhaustive investigation and research into every phase of Medfield's life--a period during which Medfield residents themselves provided substantial assistance to the Planners in the collection and analysis of data. Nine Working Committees prepared detailed reports on their assigned subjects and over 2500 residents participated in comprehensive surveys. From school buildings to road systems, from zoning requirements to conservation problems every aspect was examined in complete detail and nothing was judged too insignificant to merit the Planners' closest scrutiny. In 1964 the Planners completed their assignment and published their Master Plan in seven volumes. With the aid of statistics and maps, problems are analyzed, priorities assigned and remedies are proposed which, if implemented in the manner and at the time recommended by the Plan, will ensure that Medfield's growth through 1980 is orderly and controlled. (A Summary of the Master Plan is available to all Medfield residents and those who do not have a copy are urged to obtain one from the Town Hall.) Following a recommendation by the Planning Board, a Special Town Meeting in 1965 sanctioned the appointment of a Master Plan Implementation Committee (MPIC) , the primary function of which is to channel the efforts of other Town Committees and Boards in the directions recommended in the Plan. The fifth anniversary of the Plan's publication now provides the MPIC an appropriate opportunity to review the major accomplishments and failures of the Town Meetings in recent years in implementing the Plan's recommendations. These can be summarized as follows: 1. SCHOOLS The new Junior High School, approved by the Town in 1964, was completed and opened in 1966. In 1968, construction began on the Elementary School on Elm Street--on land acquired for that specific purpose in 1965. The school is scheduled to open in 1969. 2. BUILDING CODES AND ZONING LAWS Regulatory measures are fundamental to orderly growth. Such measures, essential to the implementation of the Master Plan and undertaken since 1964, include: -Adoption of a Building Code, approved by the Attorney General's Office. -Revision of Subdivision Rules and Regulations. -Amendment of Zoning By-laws with respect to apartment buildings. -Adoption of Zoning By-laws for the Industrial Area. -Drafting of Zoning Regulations for the Central Business District. This matter is still under review and the services of Metcalf and Eddy have again been retained to re-examine the whole question of the location and character of the Central Business District. As is evident, progress in these matters has been impressive but much still needs to be done. An immediate necessity is for a Soils Survey Analysis, a proposal for which was rejected by the Town in 1968. Such a Survey is essential for efficient planning and without it serious consequences could develop, particularly with respect to on lot water and sewage systems. Therefore, the Planning Board have provided for this Survey in their 1969 budget, to be presented at Town Meeting in March. 3. RECREATION A major development has been the opening of a new Community Recreation Center in the old North Street School, an accomplishment which owes most of its success to the resourcefulness of the youth themselves who not only renovated the building and are now maintaining it but, with some Town appropriation, have contributed the funds necessary for this project. Although the conversion of North Street School to a Recreation Center is not proposed in the Master Plan, the MPIC nevertheless considers this a most valuable asset, both for the young people and for the many Town Committees and organizations who also now use it extensively. In 1966, the Town approved funds for the building of new basketball and tennis courts at the Junior High School. In 1967 the Town approved funds to operate a skating rink on Green Street. Additional land adjacent to the Town's swimming pond was acquired in 1968. 4. CONSERVATION Land along the Charles and Stop Rivers acquired by the Town and set aside for conservation now totals 190.85 acres. Conservation and recreation land in Medfield administered by the Trustees of Reservations now total 662 acres. 5. HIGHWAYS AND STREETS Medfield has kept in touch with other towns affected by the proposed relocation of Route 109 and with the State Department of Public Works in whose hands the matter now rests. The Town has sanctioned the financing of land takings resulting from the planned reconstruction and relocation of Route 27. The new route--from Main Street to the Sherborn Line--will roughly parallel that recommended in the Master Plan. Approval has been given to reconstruct a section of Elm Street from South Street to cater to the requirements of the new school. Traffic lights are to be installed at the North and Main Street intersection. This proposal was defeated in 1967 but accepted by the Town in 1968. The street numbering project on all existing and proposed streets in the Town was completed in 1966. various streets have been reconstructed and others have been paved under the Street Improvement Program. 6. WATER SYSTEM AND SEWERAGE The Town's water supply has been augmented by the commissioning of a new well off Elm Street. r A new package sewage treatment plant has been installed and while this may satisfy current needs discussions continue between various Town departments and outside engineers on the possible requirement for additional sewerage and a larger treatment plant. 7. TOWN BUILDINGS AND LANDS It is under this heading that the Master Plan has suffered most of its defeats so far: -In 1965 the proposal to acquire land adjacent to the Town Hall for the purpose of a Common and parking area was rejected. -In 1965 and 1966 funds for North Street School's renovation and conversion to a municipal office building were denied. (In 1967, however, sanction was given to transfer the building to the Park and Recreation Commission for use as a Community Center.) -In 1967 the voters rejected the proposal to acquire land and construct thereon a garage to house Town equipment. -Although the Town had/ in 1965, approved the purchase of the adjacent bank building for the expansion of the existing Library, funds to implement this program were denied in 1966 and 1967. In 1968, however, funds were voted to redecorate and refurbish the existing library. The old bank building is now used by the Historical Society. SUMMARY In retrospect/ it can be seen that, despite some setbacks, much has been accomplished in the last five years, and the Town's investment in a Master Plan has paid substantial dividends. In order to carry the Plan through its next/ and perhaps most critical stage of development/ the MPIC, in consultation with other Town Committees and Boards, is now preparing a Capital Outlay Program, the implementation of which will ensure that the next five years will contribute even more to Medfield's orderly growth. Joseph C. Donnelly, Jr. Chairman Paul Hurd, Vice Chairman Grace P. Ritchie, Secretary John V. Cracknell Richard Kaerwer Robert Macleod Elizabeth M. Place Richard V. Sturtevant l 11964-1969 The First Five Years_Page_21964-1969 The First Five Years_Page_31964-1969 The First Five Years_Page_4

BoS 8/13

The Select Board agenda for 8/13/19 appears below and the backup materials can be accessed here 20190813-agenda

TOWN OF MEDFIELD MEETING NOTICE POSTED: ,;V.:JFMEOFI£LO,MAS'S. /iii1i(i .„. -q jq^CLERK °f£.i^ TOWN OFTHE nLFRK POSTED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROVISIONS OF M.G.L. CHAPTER 39 SECTION 23AAS AMENDED. Board of Selectmen Board or Committee AGENDA (Subiect to chanse) 7:00 PM Call to order Disclosure ofvideo recording We want to take a moment of appreciation for our Troops serving in the Middle East and around the world Citizen Comment Action Items Police ChiefGuerette requests the Selectmen vote to sign Request for Transfer from Franklin Police Department to Medfield for Conor Ashe Discussion Review 2018 Consultant's public and private parking report Licenses and Permits (consent aeenda) Medfield Youth Basketball, David Higgins coordinator, requests permission to place signs August 15 to September 15 announcing registration Tmstees of Reservations requests a one-day wine and malt beverage permit for August 24 event, Fireside Yoga and Sunset Brew Hike at Rocky Woods Reservation 7-9:30PM. Beverage provided by Jack's Abby Brewery Bike to the Beach for Autism organization requests permission to ride through a part of Medfield on Saturday August 31 beginning at 7:00 AM PLACE OF MEETING DAY. DATE, AND TIME Town Hall, Chenery Meeting Room, 2 floor Tuesday August 13,2019 @ 7:00 PM Kenney Road neighborhood requests a Block Party permit for Saturday September 14, 2019 from 3-8PM. Rain date Sunday September 15, 3-7PM Pendine Meeting Minutes January 8; Febmary 5; March 19; April 2; April 23 Review updated Board ofSelectmen Action List Town Administrator Update f^- C: c"~" ,..; SelectmenReport s—w ; Informational Medfield Conservation Commission information packet Next meeting dates Thursday August 29; Tuesday September 3 •.-), c;- ~n ^ IE -n- BZ] > p? ^^ ^ °' ^:3'm= ^~~: > cn c» Cj w §-T-(T20190813-agenda_Page_2