Monthly Archives: May 2016

Senate’s Medfield amendments in budget

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John Nunnari follows the legislature closely for the architects, and kindly also keeps the town administration informed about happenings that affect Medfield.  This from John this morning about:

  • funding to repair the West Street bridge
  • funding a road to the Charles River overlook on the state land next to the former MSH site
  • north south railroad line in town

See below for all amendments filed to the Senate budget dealing directly with Medfield.

 

Debate begins tomorrow.

 

John

 

Amendment #116

West Street Bridge in Medfield and Millis

Mr. Ross moved that the proposed new text be amended, in Section 2, in item 1599-0026, by adding at the end thereof the following:- “provided that not less than $1,000,000 shall be expended for the maintenance of the West Street Bridge in the towns of Medfield and Millis”; and in said item, by striking out the figures “$5,000,000” and inserting in place thereof the figures “$6,000,000”

 

Amendment #883

Accessibility to Open Space

Mr. Timilty moved that the proposed new text be amended, in Section 2, in item 2810-0100, by inserting the following:- “provided further, that not less than $200,000 shall be expended for the creation of a roadway at the property formally known as the Medfield State Hospital in the town of Medfield.”

 

Amendment #1154

Framingham Secondary Line

Mr. Timilty moved that the proposed new text be amended by adding at the end thereof the following new section:-

SECTION X. No funds shall be disbursed to the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority under section 35T of chapter 10 of the General Laws for the extension of services on the Framingham Secondary line in the towns of Framingham, Sherborn, Medfield, Walpole, Foxborough, and Mansfield including, but not limited to, for the addition of new line service through the creation of a new line, extension of a current line or increasing the service area of a current line until the authority receives legislative approval for a plan, specifically detailing:

(i) how the authority will pay for the proposed expansion

(ii) certification that such expansion and diversion of funding will not adversely affect existing services already offered by the authority and

(iii) certification that the state of the Framingham Secondary line’s real property, including but not limited to the physical track, at-grade crossings, and safety features to protect abutters, have been upgraded, repaired, or replaced to meet any increase in service

The plan shall be submitted to the clerks of the senate and house of representatives, the joint committee on transportation and the chairs of the senate and house committees on ways and means

 

 

 

John Nunnari, Assoc AIA
Executive Director, AIA MA

MCPE annual meeting at Zullo Thursday

 

MCPE

This Thursday, May 26th, please join us for the MCPE Annual Meeting at 7:00 PM at the Zullo Gallery. All are welcome.

We will be honoring and celebrating the following award winners:

  • MHS Principal Robert Parga is the recipient of the Robert C. Maguire Global Perspectives in Education Award because of his leadership, work behind the scenes, and openness. He creates and supports an environment that gives teachers and administrators the latitude and resources to present students with a variety of international study opportunities.
  • Fifth grade teacher Kerry Cowell and Principal Steve Grenham are the recipients of the Elizabeth Busconi Memorial Award for their grant request for a new graphic novel section in the Dale Street School Library dedicated to former Wheelock teacher Elizabeth Busconi.
  • The recipients of the Thomas Reis Award are:

Randie Groden, Melissa Bilsborough, Marissa Foley, Steve Grenham, Orla Berry, Phil Brown, Rudy Cassidy, Kyle Keegan and John Stewart. The award, which was established in 1995 to honor former Superintendent Reis, annually recognizes the grant which promotes cooperation among schools, develops

new programs of study and highlights creativity and innovation. This year’s award is shared between three robotics grants from Memorial, Dale Street and the High School. These grants funded three separate, but related, creative, innovative advances in the study of robotics, fostering a commitment to the discipline, beginning with students as young as PreK and continuing through the completion of high school.

Medfield night at the Natick Mall, unitl 9

20160425_HIPS_Event_Invite_Print

Come visit the HIPS exhibit at the Natick Mall tonight, and have a Medfield person as your tour guide, until 9 PM.  The exhibit allows one to walk around in a teen’s bedroom full of all the things that indicate that substance abuse is happening.

Medfield Cares About Prevention (MCAP) (www.MedfieldCares.org) is staffing the exhibit tonight.

MMA on Senate budget

MMA

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

SENATE BUDGET COMMITTEE OFFERS $39.5B FY 2017 STATE BUDGET THAT MAKES KEY INVESTMENTS IN MUNICIPAL AND SCHOOL AID

• INCLUDES THE FULL $42M INCREASE IN UNRESTRICTED MUNICIPAL AID (UGGA)

• INCREASES CHAPTER 70 BY $44M ABOVE THE GOVERNOR’S BUDGET TO PROVIDE MINIMUM AID OF $55 PER STUDENT, INCREASE TARGET SHARE FUNDING, AND HELP ADDRESS THE LOW-INCOME STUDENT FACTOR

• ADDS $9.3M TO FULLY FUND THE SPECIAL EDUCATION CIRCUIT BREAKER

• LEVEL-FUNDS MOST OTHER MUNICIPAL AND SCHOOL ACCOUNTS

• BUT THE SW&M BUDGET CUTS $16.6M FROM KINDERGARTEN DEVELOPMENT GRANTS, WHICH WOULD CREATE SHORTFALLS IN 164 SCHOOL DISTRICTS

Earlier today, the Senate Ways and Means Committee reported out a tight $39.5 billion fiscal 2017 state budget plan to increase overall state expenditures by approximately 3.5 percent. The Senate Ways and Means budget is slightly smaller than the budget passed by the House in April and the version filed by the Governor in March, yet it would offer the largest increase in Chapter 70 aid. The full Senate will debate the fiscal 2017 state budget beginning on Tuesday, May 24.

S. 4, the Senate Ways & Means budget, provides strong progress on many important local aid priorities, including the full $42 million increase in Unrestricted General Government Aid that the Governor and House have agreed on. The SW&M Committee would increase funding for several major aid programs, by adding $9.3 million to the Special Education Circuit Breaker, increasing Chapter 70 minimum aid to $55 per student, and by adding funds in the Chapter 70 distribution to help address the low-income student calculation (the House budget has a separate $10 million reserve account for this issue), and to accelerate implementation of the so-called target share provisions in Chapter 70.

PLEASE CLICK HERE TO SEE YOUR COMMUNITY’S LOCAL AID AND PRELIMINARY CHERRY SHEET NUMBERS IN THE SENATE WAYS & MEANS BUDGET, AS ESTIMATED BY THE DIVISION OF LOCAL SERVICES

$42 MILLION INCREASE IN UNRESTRICTED MUNICIPAL AID

In a major victory for cities and towns, S. 4 (the SW&M fiscal 2017 budget plan) would provide $1.021 billion for UGGA, a $42 million increase over current funding – the same increase proposed by Governor Baker and the House of Representatives. The $42 million would increase UGGA funding by 4.3 percent, which matches the growth in state tax collections next year. This would be the largest increase in discretionary municipal aid in nearly a decade. Every city and town would see their UGGA funding increase by 4.3 percent.

CHAPTER 70 MINIMUM AID WOULD INCREASE TO $55 PER STUDENT

The Senate budget committee is proposing a $116 million increase in Chapter 70 education aid above fiscal 2016 levels, providing every city, town and school district with an increase of at least $55 per student. In addition to the minimum aid increase, which matches the House-passed level, the SW&M Committee would add additional funds to aid communities impacted by changes in the calculations used to account for low-income students. (The House included a $10 million reserve account for this issue instead of incorporating the funds into the Chapter 70 distribution). Further, the SW&M budget would accelerate the implementation of the 2007 target share provisions (the Senate proposal is to fund 85% of the target share goal, compared to the House’s 70% funding level). Overall, the SW&M budget would provide $44 million more in direct Chapter 70 distributions than the Governor’s budget, and $20 million more than the House (or $10 million more after recognizing the House’s $10 million reserve for low-income students).

$9.3 MILLION INCREASE INTENDED TO FULLY FUND SPECIAL EDUCATION CIRCUIT BREAKER

In another victory for cities and towns, Senate leaders have announced that they support full funding for the Special Education Circuit Breaker program. Their budget plan would provide $281.1 million, a $9.3 million increase above fiscal 2016, with the intention of fully funding the account. The Governor level funded the circuit-breaker program, and the House provided a $5 million increase. This is a vital program that every city, town and school district relies on to fund state-mandated services.

BUT THE SW&M BUDGET WOULD CUT $16.6 MILLION FROM KINDERGARTEN DEVELOPMENT GRANTS, AN 89% REDUCTION THAT WOULD HIT 164 DISTRICTS

In a troubling development, S. 4 would cut $16.6 million from Kindergarten Development Grants, leaving only $2 million in this program that funds Kindergarten programs in 164 school districts. The Governor and House level-funded the program at $18.6 million. Restoring these funds will be a major priority during the budget debate, and local officials will want to talk with their Senators about this program right away. Please click here to see if your community is receiving these grants in fiscal 2016. These funds are in jeopardy if the S. 4 appropriation remains in place.

FUNDING FOR CHARTER SCHOOL REIMBURSEMENTS INCREASED BY $7 MILLION, BUT STILL UNDERFUNDED

Under state law, cities and towns that host or send students to charter schools are entitled to be reimbursed for a portion of their lost Chapter 70 aid. The state fully funded the reimbursement program in fiscal years 2013 and 2014, but is underfunding reimbursements by approximately $46.5 million this year. The Senate Ways and Means budget would increase funding for charter school reimbursements to $87.5 million, a $7 million boost. This is $2 million more than the House proposed and $15 million less than the amount recommended by Gov. Baker. The program is underfunded in all three budget proposals, and increasing this account will be a top priority during the Senate budget debate.

REGIONAL SCHOOL TRANSPORTATION, PAYMENTS-IN-LIEU-OF-TAXES (PILOT), LIBRARY AID ACCOUNTS, METCO, McKINNEY-VENTO, AND SHANNON ANTI-GANG GRANTS

The Senate budget committee’s proposal would level-fund Regional School Transportation Reimbursements at $59 million ($1 million less than the House budget), level fund PILOT payments at $26.77 million (the same as the House and Governor), level-fund METCO at $20.1 million, and level-fund McKinney-Vento reimbursements at $8.35 million. S. 4 would fund library grant programs at $18.9 million ($70K less than fiscal 2016 and $750K less than the House). The SW&M budget would reduce Shannon Anti-Gang Grants to $5 million (a $2 million reduction below fiscal 2016, and $1 million below the House).

Please Call Your Senators Today to Thank Them for the Strong Municipal Aid and Chapter 70 Investments in the Senate Ways and Means Committee Budget, Including the $42 Million Increase in Unrestricted Local Aid, Providing Chapter 70 Minimum Aid at $55 Per Student, and Full Funding for the Special Education Circuit Breaker

Please Let Your Senators Know if You Are Affected by Underfunding in Charter School Reimbursements and Kindergarten Development Grants

Please Explain How the Senate Ways and Means Budget Impacts Your Community, and Ask Your Senators to Build on this Progress During Budget Debate in the Senate

$200K more in FY17 state aide proposed

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The Senate budget numbers for FY17 are now out, and they are the same as the House numbers.  We are looking at about a $200K increase over last year.  John Nunnari provided the following proposed state funding for Medfield numbers.


Just in case you hadn’t seen it, the Senate budget came out today.

Here is where Medfield stands in terms of Chapter 70 allocations.

john

 

Municipality/Regional District 7061-0008 Chapter 70 Unrestricted General Government Aid Annual Formula Local Aide
FY ’15 Actual Appropriation $5,862,409.00 $1,289,875.00 $0.00
FY ’16 Actual Appropriation $5,925,859.00 $1,336,310.00
Governors FY ’17 Proposal $5,975,759.00 $1,393,771.00 $0.00
Medfield (House FY ’17 Proposed Numbers) $6,063,084.00 $1,393,771.00 $0.00
Medfield (Senate FY 17 Proposed Numbers) $6,063,084.00 $1,393,771.00 $0.00
FY ’17 Conference Committee Report           July +/- $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

 

 

John Nunnari, Assoc AIA
Executive Director, AIA MA

Energy Committee on 5/12

MEC

MEC Meeting Minutes – May  12th, 2016

Attendance: Fred Bunger, Lee Alinsky, Pete Peterson, Maciej Konieczny, Fred Davis, Marie Nolan,  Andrew Seaman by phone.

  1. To begin the meeting, we linked in to an MCAN webinar on the new state energy bill. Speakers were:

Caitlin Sloane Peale from Conservation Law Foundation concerning State Energy Sourcing

Amber Hewett from the National Wildlife Federation about opportunities for offshore wind generation

Eugenia Gibbons from Mass Energy Alliance talking about opposition to new gas pipelines

Josh Craft from the Environmental League of Massachusetts encouraged contacting our State representatives.

The Energy Committee discussed writing as a group, but decided each member should act individually.

  1. April 7th and April 21st meeting minutes accepted with corrections.
  2. Energy Manager’s Report
    1. WWTP Solar: generating and exporting electricity, fixing issues with one inverter and data acquisition.
    2. DPW Solar: 150KW system, need help to write RFP for design/build project(SDA not available)
    3. Public Safety Building: 61KW system being installed as change order by general contractor. Bids out by end of May.
    4. Andrew announced that he is leaving the Medfield Energy Manager job and will be relocating his family to the Philadelphia area.
  3. Solarize Massachusetts: Select Board approved Solarize project April 19th. Website for Solarize Medfield is live and there are already 6 sign-ups.  RFP to select installers was sent into Solarize Mass for review.  Plan to select installer by end of June and schedule a “meet the installer” by the end of July.
  4. Green Communities 20% Energy Reduction Plan
    1. Baseline year 2015 selected as having a full year of Energy Insight data and being a relatively cold year. Year runs July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015.
    2. An energy conservation program will need to be developed for each Town Department/major energy user.
    3. Discussed having each member of the Energy Committee volunteer to work with Andrew and the Department staff to conduct audits and to develop each Town Department’s energy conservation plan.
  5. Andrew will determine if it would be helpful to include Housing Authority’s Tilden Village in the baseline and conservation plans.
  6. Meeting was adjourned at 9:20

Next Meeting:  Thursday June 9th

Montrose sells Cushman house

David Temple, President of the Medfield Historical Society and Co-chair of the  Medfield Historical Commission, reported today that the long dilapidated Jacob Cushman house on North Street is getting fixed up.  This email this afternoon from David –


After a prolonged period of working out the details with the Montrose School, Bob Borrelli just called me to say he is finally signing a purchase and sale agreement this afternoon on the 1852 Cushman house at 67 North Street.  Bob plans to keep the basic structure as seen from the street essentially as is, probably with different colors, and he hopes it will complement his new building across the street.  He plans to rent the first floor as retail space, likely with apartments on the second floor.

 

Saving the historic Cushman house has been a frustrating six-year campaign of prodding the school, as we watched the house succumbing to demolition by neglect. I am glad that Bob saw the potential in the building and called to ask me about it over a year ago. I was able to arrange the first meetings between Bob and Montrose. Then I got out of the way, except for occasionally nudging Bob or Jack Flaherty at the school to get them back at the bargaining table. Thank you, Bob, for sticking with the project!

 

Bob still has to get approvals from town boards, but he expects he’ll be able to start construction very soon. He plans to have the exterior work done before the girls come back to school in September, and he hopes to have everything finished by Thanksgiving.
David F. Temple