Category Archives: Uncategorized

#medfieldspecialplaces

Test to see if email posting to blog is fixed.

Anthology scene V

Steve and Cynthia Small, of the Medfield Gazebo Payers, as two doctors in 1917, reviewing some of their patients.

Anthology at MSH

Best,
Pete
Osler L. Peterson, attorney at Law
PETERSON | Law
580 Washington Street
Newton, MA 02458-1416
T. 617.969.1500
F.. 617.663.6088
M. 508.359.9190

66 North Street, PO Box 358
Medfield, MA 02052-0358

Osler.Peterson@OslerPeterson.com

Sent from my phone, so please excuse typos.

Suicide Prevention for parents – tonight at 7:30PM

 

Suicide Prevention – PARENTS Invited to attend Mon 9/23 at 7:30pm

St. Edward Church and UCC Medfield are collaborating on this important initiative, along with the Medfield Coalition for Suicide Prevention.

By Colleen M. Sullivan, Patch Mayor 
Suicide Prevention - PARENTS Invited to attend Mon 9/23 at 7:30pm
Dear Middle and High School Parents,

In collaboration with the Medfield Coalition for Suicide Prevention (MedfieldCSP), the faith based community in Medfield is excited to present new programming for teen peer to peer training for mental and emotional well-being and awareness.

Last June, many high schoolers participated in a focus group facilitated by Dr. Nadja Reilly, from William James College. The intent was to listen to these students to unveil some pressing issues the students may be experiencing and their root causes. Our students’ input was profound and extremely insightful. Based on the feedback from student and parent focus groups, we have started to develop programming and we would love to share this information with you.

We invite parents to learn about this new peer to peer training initiative and hear ways parents/guardians can support emotional resilience in our youth. Dr. Reilly will be presenting on Monday, September 23 at 7:30pm – 8:30pm at St. Edward the Confessor Church, 133 Spring Street, Medfield.

St. Edward Church and UCC Medfield are collaborating on this important initiative, along with the Medfield Coalition for Suicide Prevention. Please note that while the two faith communities are organizing this initiative, events are open to all parents within the Medfield community.

We hope you will join us – RSVP HERE!

If you have any questions or would like further information, please reach out to any one of us!

With gratitude, MedfieldCSP members,

Anna Mae O’Shea Brooke

amobrooke@ejcatholic.org

Arturo Rodriguez

arodriguez@uccmedfield.org

EEE information

I received this information this afternoon from Medfield Board of Health member, Carol Read, who works for the Needham Board of Health –

***************************************************

For the most updated information on EEE risk and aerial spraying, contact the DPH Division of Epidemiology (617) 983-6800 or visit the DPH website at:  www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito  for updated mosquito results, maps and incidence of positive mosquito samples.

https://www.mass.gov/mosquito-borne-diseases

 

For general information on mosquito control, contact the State Reclamation and Mosquito Control Board within MDAR at (617) 626-1723

 

https://www.mass.gov/guides/aerial-mosquito-control-summer-2019 Mosquito control

 

Who do I contact to learn more about aerial spraying in my area?

Your local health department will be aware of any plans for aerial spraying.

Updates will be provided via local media outlets, social media, and other channels.

For questions about aerial spraying, contact MDAR Crop and Pest Services at (617) 626- 1700.

For the most updated information on EEE risk and aerial spraying, contact the DPH Division of Epidemiology (617) 983-6800 or visit the DPH website for updated mosquito results, maps and incidence of positive mosquito samples.

 

www.mass.gov/guides/aerial-mosquito-control-summer-2019

 

2019 Massachusetts Arbovirus Daily Update- Animal and Human confirmation by geographic area

Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus activity has been detected in Barnstable, Bristol, Essex, Franklin, Hampden, Hampshire, Middlesex, Norfolk, Plymouth and Worcester counties. Four human cases of EEE have been confirmed so far this year.

http://www.mosquitoresults.com/

 

Carol Read, M.Ed, CAGS, CPS

Substance Use Prevention & Education

Needham Public Health Division

178 Rosemary Street Needham, MA 02492  Office: (781) 455-7940 (ext. 222)

cread@needhamma.gov   www.needhamma.gov/health/substanceabuse

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1 Aerial Mosquito Control to Reduce Risk of Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) Summer 2019 Revised 8/19/2019 What is Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE)? Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) is a rare but serious disease caused by a virus that can affect people of all ages. EEE is generally spread to humans through the bite of a mosquito infected with the virus. EEE can cause severe illness and possibly lead to death in any age group; however, people under age 15 are at particular risk. EEE does not occur every year, but based on mosquito sampling, a high risk of occurrence of human cases currently exists. When is aerial spraying of insecticides considered? Truck-mounted ground spraying is already taking place in some communities in Massachusetts. In situations where there is a high risk of human disease, the state’s response plan recommends consideration of the use of an aerial pesticide spray in the evening and overnight hours to reduce the number of infected, adult mosquitoes in the specific areas of high risk. Many breeding areas of high concern are not accessible by truck-mounted ground sprayers. How is aerial spraying conducted? Aerial spraying is conducted by aircraft in areas of concern beginning in the early evening up until 4:30am the next morning. What pesticide product would be used in the aerial spraying? The pesticide used is called Anvil 10+10, a product extensively tested and used in both ground-level and aerial spraying in the U.S. to control mosquitoes. Anvil 10+10 contains two ingredients: Sumithrin and Piperonyl butoxide. Sumithrin is an ingredient similar to the natural components of the chrysanthemum flower which is also found in other pesticide products used indoors, in pet shampoos, and tick control treatments. Sumithrin is rapidly inactivated and decomposes with exposure to light and air, with a half-life of less than one day in the air and on plants. In soil, it degrades rapidly. Sumithrin has proven to be extremely effective in killing mosquitoes worldwide for over 20 years. Piperonyl butoxide (PBO) serves to increase the ability of Sumithrin to kill mosquitoes. The product is registered by EPA and in Massachusetts for this use. It was used in 2 previous aerial applications for mosquito control (2006, 2010, 2012). It is also used by some of the Mosquito Control Projects for ground applications. Are there precautions I should take if spraying will occur in my area? No special precautions are recommended; however, residents can reduce exposure by staying indoors during spraying. Aerial spraying is conducted at night and the active ingredients of the pesticide product used for aerial application for mosquito control generally break down quickly and leave no residue. Although aerial spraying is considered necessary to reduce human risk, it will not eliminate risk. It is critical that residents protect themselves from mosquito bites by staying indoors during peak mosquito hours from dusk to dawn, applying insect repellent when outdoors, draining standing water where mosquitoes breed, and repairing screens in doors and windows. Residents should also take steps to protect their pets from mosquito bites. Are there any health impacts associated with exposure to Anvil 10+10? There are no health risks expected during or after spraying. There is no evidence that aerial spraying of Anvil 10+10 will exacerbate certain health conditions, such as asthma or chemical sensitivity. Can these targeted ground and aerial sprays harm other insects or wildlife? Aerial spraying will be conducted in the nighttime hours, when fish are less likely to be at the surface feeding and honeybees are most likely to be in their hives. Owners should cover small ornamental fishponds during the night of spraying. These fishponds can be uncovered in the morning after spraying has been completed. If I am a beekeeper, should I take special precautions to protect the bees before or after aerial spraying? We do not anticipate negative impacts on honey bee colonies since the aerial spraying will take place at night. If bees are congregating outside the hive box(es), consider applying a cover to the hive entrance or over the entire hive box(es) using a loose wet cloth (burlap, sheet, etc.) to prevent bees from exiting, thus not allowing for direct contact during the application. If miticides have been applied and there is concern about ventilation during covering, consider adding an additional empty box on top to increase ventilation within the hive during the application. Remove covers and additional boxes placed on hives as soon as possible the morning following application. To report signs of acute honey bee mortality defined as larger than normal quantities of dead or dying bees at the entrance or inside hives post application, contact the Apiary Program Message Line ASAP by calling 617-626-1801 Is there a risk to drinking water sources? No. Aerial spraying is not expected to have any impacts on surface water or drinking water. 3 Who do I contact to learn more about aerial spraying in my area? Your local health department will be aware of any plans for aerial spraying. Updates will be provided via local media outlets, social media, and other channels. For questions about aerial spraying, contact MDAR Crop and Pest Services at (617) 626-1700. For the most updated information on EEE risk and aerial spraying, contact the DPH Division of Epidemiology (617) 983-6800 or visit the DPH website at www.mass.gov/guides/aerial-mosquito-control-summer-2019 for updated mosquito results, maps and incidence of positive mosquito samples. For general information on mosquito control, contact the State Reclamation and Mosquito Control Board within MDAR at (617) 626-1723.20190819-MDPH-Short-FAQ-EEE-and-Mosquito-Control-8-19-2019 MDPH_Page_220190819-MDPH-Short-FAQ-EEE-and-Mosquito-Control-8-19-2019 MDPH_Page_3

Office hours this Friday

office hours sign

Selectman Office Hours will be this Friday, July 19

I hold regular monthly office hours at The Center, usually on the first Friday of every month from 9:00 to 10:00 AM – however, for July, due to The Center being closed on the 4th, the office hours will be Friday, July 19.

Residents are welcome to stop by to talk in person about any town matters.

Residents can also have coffee and see the Council on Aging in action (a vibrant organization with lots going on). Peterson can be reached via 508-359-9190 or his blog about Medfield matters <https://medfield02052.wordpress.com>/, where any schedule changes will be posted

July 4th

Declaration-of-Independence

Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence?

24 of the 56 were LAWYERS . . . and damn good ones too . . . because they all valued the American civil jury system

Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured before they died.

 

Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned.

 

Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army; another had two sons captured.

 

Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or hardships of the Revolutionary War.

 

They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor.

 

What kind of men were they?

 

Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists.

 

Eleven were merchants, nine were farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well-educated, but they signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the penalty would be death if they were captured.

 

Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the British Navy. He sold his home and properties to pay his debts, and died in rags.

 

Thomas McKeam was so hounded by British that he was forced to move his family almost constantly. He served in the Congress without pay, his family was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him – poverty was his reward.

 

Vandals or soldiers looted properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer, Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.

 

At Battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson,Jr., noted that the British General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General George Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed, and Nelson died bankrupt.

 

Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed. The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months.

 

John Hart was driven from his wife’s bedside as she was dying. Their 13 children fled for their lives. His fields and his  gristmill were laid to waste. For more than a year he lived in forests and caves, returning home to find his wife dead and his children vanished.

 

So, take a few minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and silently thank these patriots.  It’s not much to ask for the price they paid.

 

Remember: freedom is never free! We thank these early patriots, as well as those patriots now fighting to KEEP our freedom!