Category Archives: Safety

MCAP gets $625K Federal grant

MCAP Logo with URL_1C_300

Chelsea Goldstein-WalshChelsea Goldstein-Walsh, Interim Director of Medfield Youth Outreach announced this afternoon that Medfield Cares About Prevention (MCAP) (www.MedfieldCares.org) was today awarded a Drug-Free Communities grant of $625,000, to fund a Substance Use Prevention Coordinator who will run MCAP’s  prevention efforts.  The Federal grant will pay MCAP $125,000 per year for five years,  with the hope that the Substance Use Prevention Coordinator position will become permanent after five years.  About 150 DFC grants nation wide were awarded this year.  Towns that have received past DFC grants have seen a statistical decrease is substance abuse.

Medfield Youth Outreach, first through Dawn Alcott and now Chelsea, initiated, oversee, and manage the MCAP coalition.  MCAP had come exceedingly close to getting the Federal grant in prior years it applied. 

This year, however, MCAP had the added benefit of having received a $5,000 grant from the Medfield Foundation Legacy Fund’s 2018 inaugural round of grants, which monies MCAP used to hire a grant writer, thereby parlaying the Legacy Fund grant into the $625,000 of benefit for the Town of Medfield. 

 

mfi-legacy-fund

The Medfield Foundation Legacy Fund is an endowment, created and being funded to make life better in Medfield.

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Above photo was from the inaugural Medfield Foundation Legacy Fund grant awards celebration. From L to R are Todd Trehubenko, Christian Donner of the Medfield Rail Trail, Dawn Alcott of MCAP, Jean Mineo of the Cultural Alliance, and Chris Cahill (Todd and Chris are the Co-chairs of the Medfield Foundation Legacy Fund’s Community Board).

 

The following was Chelsea’s email announcing her good news to MCAP –

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I am happy to report that Medfield Cares About Prevention was selected as one of the Drug-Free Communities grant recipients for this funding cycle! Our town will receive $125,000 a year for 5 years ($625,000 total) to implement prevention strategies aimed at reducing youth substance use. You can see the list of recipients here: https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/FY-2019-DFC-New-Grant-Award-Recipients-10.29.2019.pdf

Thank you all for your hard work in making our grant application a success! Our next step is to solidify the hiring process for a full-time coalition coordinator with the grant funding to help us implement this work. Our next MCAP meeting on Monday, November 4th at 11:30 am will largely be dedicated to coming up with a hiring plan. I’ve attached a copy of the job description for the coalition coordinator for your reference.

Congratulations to you all for this successful team effort!

Warmly,

Chelsea

Medfield Youth Outreach

 

 

 

ISO rating upped

MFD-patch

Town ISO rating upped

This email this past week from Fire Chief/EMD, William C. Carrico II

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I am pleased to announce that the Town of Medfield ISO rating for structural fire suppression has changed from Public Protection Class 4 to Public Protection Class 3.  The ISO Public Protection Classification program plays an important role in the underwriting of insurance companies when dealing with personnel or commercial property insurance.  The lower the rating the better the delivery of services.  The new rating was made possible by the hard work of the Medfield Fire Department firefighters and fire officers.

William C. Carrico II

Fire Chief/EMD

Medfield Fire

Help in dealing with the shootings

Received this afternoon from Carol Read, who appeared to get it from Larry Berkowitz, Director of the Riverside Trauma Center, who is also a frequent lecturer in town for the Medfield Coalition for Suicide Prevention –

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Trauma response resources: (1) ChildMind Institute (2) Riverside Trauma Center

Child Mind Institute:

 https://childmind.org/about-us/  Child Mind homepage

https://childmind.org/guide/helping-children-cope-traumatic-event/ Guide to Helping Children Cope After a Traumatic Event, PDF attached

 

 riverside-community-care

Riverside Trauma Center: Children and trauma, resource links, article, attached and post from Larry Berkowitz, Director, copied below.

https://riversidetraumacenter.org/  Trauma Center homepage

https://riversidetraumacenter.org/trauma-center-resources/  Resources, talking to children, youth and adolescents, coping strategies and practicing self-care after traumatic events.  Talking with childrenPDF attached

 

Larry Berkowitz

Yesterday at 6:41 AM

One again we are confronted by the horror and tragedy of mass killing… See More Below

One again we are confronted by the horror and tragedy of mass killings. The news from Ohio and Texas leads to a wide range of reactions: fear, anger, sadness, distress, confusion, disgust, to name just a few emotions. But it is not just emotions- our reactions take on many forms including recurrent thoughts about the events, shattered assumptions about our safety, concentration difficulties, bodily reactions such as feeling exhausted or whatever our “usual” somatic reactions are. For people who have been directly impacted by violence, we know their reactions may be more pronounced, and we have many resources on our website that we hope people will find helpful and suggestions on how to talk with children about these awful events. http://riversidetraumacenter.org/trauma-center-resources/

My greatest concern in these past two days has been the frequency with which I’ve heard people say “we’re not safe anywhere” or “this is the new normal.” I strongly believe we must reject the attitude that we live a new normal, as that implies a sense of learned helplessness, a conviction that nothing can be done. While we may feel vulnerable, we are certainly not helpless. I urge each of us to take personal responsibility for taking some action in response to these latest mass killings. Use your voice! Write a letter, write an email, make phone calls, use social media, contact your local, state and national representatives and express your opinion and concerns, whatever they may be. I am reminded of Margaret Mead’s oft cited quote, “never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”

 

In peace,

Larry Berkowitz

Director, Riverside Trauma Center

Riverside Trauma Center www.riversidetraumacenter.org Talking with Your Children About Traumatic Events Here are some tips for talking with your children when they have witnessed or heard about traumatic events: Listen to your children: Ask your children what they have heard about the traumatic event. What do they think happened? Let them tell you in their own words and answer their questions. Do not assume you know what they are feeling or what their questions will be. The easiest way to have this conversation might be while they are engaged in an activity: drawing, sitting on a swing, or driving with you in the car. Details that may be obvious to adults may not be to children. Be truthful, but don’t tell them more information than they can handle for their age. Focus on their safety: Once you understand their perception of the traumatic event, be clear that you will keep them safe and let them know adults (school, police, etc.) are working hard to make sure they will stay safe. Pay attention to your reactions: Your children will be watching you carefully and taking their cues from you. If you can manage your anxiety about the traumatic event, your children will be more easily reassured. Monitor your child’s access to media: It will help if young children do not watch news reports or see the front page of the newspaper. Young children who watch a traumatic event on the TV news may think the event is still ongoing or happening again. Watch for behavior changes: Your children may show you through their behavior that they are still struggling with what they have heard or seen. They may have physical complaints or regressive behaviors often including nightmares, insomnia, or bedwetting. They may feel guilty that they are responsible for the event, and need to be reassured that they are not responsible. Maintain your routines: Sticking to your daily structure of activities—mealtimes, bedtime rituals, etc.—reduces anxiety and helps children feel more in control. Keep the door open: Encourage your children to come to you with any questions or concerns and do not assume the questions will stop after a few days or even a few weeks. Let them know their fears and questions are normal and you will always make time for them. Remind them all questions are welcome. Consider this a teachable moment: For older children, this traumatic event may lead to a discussion about ways they can help others who have experienced a tragedy. You can also ask them if they know how to keep themselves safe when they are away from home. Traumatic events make us feel like we have lost control, so any constructive activities we engage in make us feel less vulnerable.

e-cigarettes in the news

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From my daily American Association for Justice newsletter –

 

US officials say e-cigarettes cannot be allowed to become a conduit for teenage addiction.

In a Washington Post (10/11, 12.5M) op-ed, HHS Secretary Alex M. Azar and FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb write that they are “deeply concerned about the risks that e-cigarettes pose for children, given how quickly teenage use of these products has accelerated.” Azar and Gottlieb say it is “crucial that e-cigarettes do not become an on-ramp for children to become addicted to nicotine. But at the same time, we believe e-cigarettes can be an important off-ramp for adults who are addicted to combustible cigarettes.” The duo add that they “know that the steps we have taken thus far are not enough. We are considering limits on the marketing and features of e-cigarettes to reverse their appeal and availability to minors. We are also actively reconsidering our policy under which certain e-cigarettes – particularly the products with flavors that might appeal to children – can remain on the market without submitting a premarket application to the FDA until 2022.”

FDA warns e-cigarette manufacturer over selling liquids containing erectile dysfunction meds.

The Philadelphia Inquirer (10/11, Schaefer, 928K) reports the FDA issued a warning letter on Thursday to e-cigarette maker HelloCig Electronic Technology after the agency found that it was selling the prescription erectile dysfunction drugs tadalafil and/or sildenafil in e-liquid form. FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb announced, “There are no e-liquids that contain prescription drugs that have been proven safe or effective through this route of administration.”

The Washington Examiner (10/11, King, 299K) reports the FDA statement accompanying the warning letter said, “These FDA-approved prescription drugs are not approved for inclusion in e-liquid products sold over the counter and are therefore being sold illegally.”

MedPage Today (10/11, Boyles, 52K) reports Gottlieb added, “There are no e-liquid products approved to contain prescription drugs or any other medications that require a doctor’s supervision.”

Fisher cat acting oddly

fisher

Odd behavior by Fisher Cat on Copperwood Road

This morning Deb and I had an encounter with a fisher cat that did not seem fearful of us at all – it came within about ten feet of me.  My neighbor later told me that it had squabbled with her dog and then peered in their screen door at them.

I alerted Jenny Cronin, the Town of Medfield Animal Control Officer, as the odd behavior made me wonder whether the fisher cat might be rabid.  Jenny said that if you see the fisher cat and know where it is at that moment, call the Medfield Police Department at 508-359-2315, and they can dispatch Jenny to see if she can capture it.

WEST NILE VIRUS RISK INCREASED TO MODERATE

Email today from the Board of Health –

mosquito

WEST NILE VIRUS RISK INCREASED TO MODERATE

the state has upgraded the ENTIRE state to the “moderate” level due to increase in activity re: WNV exposure.

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Officer, MRPC Duty <mrpcdutyofficer@challiance.org>
Date: Tue, Aug 21, 2018 at 12:08 PM
Subject: Situational Awareness: Statewide West Nile Virus Risk Level Change
To:

To: MRPC Stakeholders

 

Date: Tuesday, August 21, 2018

 

Time: 12pm

 

Subject: Statewide West Nile Virus Risk Level Change

 

Description:  MDPH has elevated the West Nile virus risk level to moderate statewide. This wide-scale increase was driven by expanding and intensifying positive mosquito findings. A press release will be issued shortly. The majority of WNV human cases occur during August and September. Please take this opportunity to urge your residents/patients to take personal protective activities to avoid mosquito bites.  Please visit results: http://www.mosquitoresults.com for updated risk maps and positive findings. If you have questions please call Matt Osborne at (617) 983-4366.

 

Regional Impact: Multiple communities across Region 4AB have a moderate risk for West Nile Virus exposure according to  http://www.mosquitoresults.com, the Massachusetts Arbovirus daily update provided by the Massachusetts Executive Office of Health and Human Services

 

MRPC Activation Level: Steady-State Monitoring, non-activated.

 

Follow up: The MRPC will continue to monitor the State’s West Nile Virus severity in the region and will provide updates from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health as they become available.

 

Attachments: None.

 

MRPC Duty Officer

Pager: (857)-239-0662

Email: mrpcdutyofficer@challiance.org (not monitored 24/7)

Suicide prevention training 7PM Tuesday

Learn in two hours how to be comfortable talking to loved ones about self harm.

The newly-formed Medfield Coalition for Suicide Prevention (“MCSP”) invites interested community members to attend a FREE suicide prevention training taught by Riverside Trauma Center. The training is intended to help address this public health crisis by rais-ing awareness of suicidal behavior and teaching tools that can help prevent suicide. The MCSP particularly encourages parents and adults to attend. We hope to offer train-ing specially targeted to youth at a future date. Tuesday, December 5, 2017 7:00-9:00 p.m. The United Church of Christ in Medfield 496 Main Street, Medfield, MA 02052 FREE to the Public For questions, contact Heather Krauss at hacarlson@hotmail.com If you are inclined to financially support the MCSP, please consider making a donation through its Go Fund Me page at https://www.gofundme.com/MedfieldCoalitionforSuicidePrevention RSVP not required, but kindly appreciated. To RSVP, please visit: http://www.signupgenius.com/go/508084ba5af2ea3f94-free