Category Archives: Teens

Medfield Foundation Legacy Fund’s 2021 grantees’ report

Legacy Fund Grantees Report

Grantees of the Medfield Foundation Legacy Fund’s latest 2021 round of grants reported to the Medfield Foundation board and the Legacy Fund founders at a meeting this past Monday evening at the Public Safety Building.

  • Peak House Heritage Society showed a remarkably informative video produced by Medfield TV of the PHHS’s archeological dig that the PHHS’s grant funded in the basement of the Peak House. Rob Gregg reported that the most mysterious findings were three 1912 license plates, mysterious because the last residents in the Peak House left in 1910. The rest of the archeological findings are in the process of being analyzed and cataloged.
  • Friends of the Medfield High School Theatre Society reported on the new cyclorama purchased with its grant which was installed at the back of the stage in the MHS auditorium, allowing for better performances. “The replacement of the MHS auditorium cyclorama allows students to engineer complex lighting scenarios; offers those performing a more complex atmosphere in which to tell their stories; and enhances the visual quality of shows for Community members who attend performances.”
  • Medfield Outreach used its grant to commission a survey of town needs, data designed to focus Outreach’s strategic plan. Outreach Director Kathy MacDonald reported on the survey and its results. “In the winter of 2022, Medfield Outreach began work to complete a community needs survey and create a five-year strategic plan for the department. What you see on these tabs is the result of that almost six month long undertaking.”
  • Sustainable Medfield used its grant to further publicize and share its mission promoting sustainability with town residents – “1. Provide residents a one-stop resource of Medfield-specific ACTIONS to improve our environment and reduce our carbon footprint. and 2. Connect community groups to network and collaborate on sustainability.”

About the Medfield Foundation Legacy Fund
The Medfield Foundation Legacy Fund Is a professionally-managed endowment created to support community-driven projects. Volunteer-run and designed to complement the initiatives of Medfield organizations, the Medfield Foundation Legacy Fund raises funds from the community and makes grants to established non-profit organizations through a competitive process. For more information or to contribute to the Medfield Foundation Legacy Fund, please visit https://www.medfieldfoundation.org/legacy-fund.

Angel Run – registration is open

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The Angel Run is back! 
Join us for the 17th running (or walking) on Sunday, December 4th at 12:30pm.




Registration is Now Open!
Early bird registration submissions received by October 28th, 2022 are $30.00 per person and will include the 2022 Angel Run shirt. 

The Angel Run is a community “fun” raiser and family event. It brings members of our community together during a festive time of year to generate funds in support of Medfield families in need. In 2006, family and friends organized the run in remembrance of Natasha Domeshek. The Medfield Foundation Inc. (MFi) took up the holiday tradition in 2012. Since then, the proceeds support town residents in need through the MFi Public Need Fund. CLICK HERE TO REGISTERThe Route
The Angel Run course is a USATF certified 5K. The Angel Run utilizes electronic disposable bib timing to ensure accurate results for all participants. The race begins at Medfield High School and ends in front of Blake Middle School. 
 
Angel Run Shirt
Commemorative Angel Run shirts are available to participants who register by the early bird deadline of October 28, 2022. Please note that shirts are available in Adult and Youth sizes. Please pick your size accordingly.  

Your shirt and race bib will be available for you to pick-up this year during the Medfield Holiday Stroll scheduled for December 2nd, as well as at Medfield High School on December 3rd and race day, December 4th.  Stay tuned for more details!

Parking
There is plenty of parking at both Medfield High School and the attached Blake Middle School. For overflow parking, we suggest using Metacomet Park which is only a few blocks walk to the starting line.

Our Presenting Sponsors
We would like to acknowledge Needham Bank and The Louis & Mary Kay Smith Family Foundation and thank them for their continued support.

About The Medfield Foundation Charity
The mission of Medfield Foundation, Inc. (MFi) is to enrich the lives of Medfield residents and build a stronger community by supporting private fundraising initiatives that address un-met public needs.  In 2021, MFi received 38 requests for assistance. Rent assistance continues to be the number one most common type of request.  As a community foundation, we have had the privilege of working with many organizations and individuals in our town to raise over $3 million dollars that has been directed back to Medfield since our inception in 2001.
 
Participation in MFi initiatives like the Angel Run have a direct impact on Medfield residents in need.  “There is so much to say about this foundation that words could never express. I have so much gratitude for everyone who is a part of this and consistently helps families such as myself. A few years ago, my lease was up for renewal and the rent increase was more than I could handle. This foundation donated a portion of the rent, which allowed me to situate my bills and funds to be able to help me be prepared for the upcoming months. The amazing souls apart of this program have honestly been a blessing and got my family and I out of multiple ruts. I hope all families in need can continue to receive their help and gratitude. Thank you again for all that you do!” – Recent recipient of MFI support.

To learn more about MFi please visit our website at http://www.medfieldfoundation.org.We look forward to seeing you in December!
 
The MFi Angel Run Team
Copyright © 2019 Medfield Foundation, All rights reserved.
You registered for the Medfield Foundation Angel Run

Our mailing address is:
Medfield Foundation
Medfield Town House
459 Main Street
Medfield, MA 02052
Add us to your address book



 

Medfield High School’s Jack Goodman drafted by Texas Rangers in MYB draft

From the Boston Herald https://www.bostonherald.com/2022/07/19/four-more-massachusetts-players-go-on-day-3-of-mlb-draft/

Digital tech bad for kids

Wisdom and a warning this morning from the New York Times – see below – connect to article here

“What makes less sense to me is why our society has done so little to protect children from the apparent damages of ubiquitous digital media. They are almost certainly larger for most children than the threat from Covid.”

Also, there was an excellent 60 Minutes piece on Sunday on the increased mental health issues youth are experiencing – via this link

May 10, 2022
Author HeadshotBy David Leonhardt
Good morning. We look at the mental health crisis facing adolescents — and the role of digital technology.
The local Boys and Girls Club in Glasgow, Ky.Annie Flanagan for The New York Times
On the phone, alone
Many measures of adolescent mental health began to deteriorate sometime around 2009. It is true of the number of U.S. high-school students who say they feel persistently sad or hopeless. It’s also true of reported loneliness. And it is true of emergency room visits for self-harm among Americans ages 10 to 19.
This timing is suspicious because internet use among adolescents was also starting to soar during the same period. Apple began selling the iPhone in 2007. Facebook opened itself for general use in late 2006, and one-third of Americans were using it by 2009.
Last month, The Times began publishing a series on adolescent mental health, and the latest piece — focusing on pediatricians who are struggling to help — has just published.
The author of the series is Matt Richtel, who has spent more than a year interviewing adolescents, their relatives and their friends. In my recent conversations with Matt about his reporting, he has gone out of his way to emphasize the uncertainty about the specific causes of the crisis, including how much of a role social media plays.
“When you look at specific research on the role of social media impacting young people, it’s quite conflicted,” he said. Some studies find that adolescents who use social media heavily are more likely to feel sad or depressed, while others find little or no effect. There is no proof that, say, TikTok or social media’s “like” button is causing the mental-health crisis.
But Matt also thinks that some of these narrow questions of cause and effect are secondary. What seems undeniable, he points out, is that surging use of digital technology has changed life’s daily rhythms.
It has led adolescents to spend less time on in-person activities, like dating, hanging out with friends and attending church. Technology use has also contributed to declines in exercise and sleep. The share of high-school students who slept at least eight hours a night fell 30 percent from 2007 to 2019, Derek Thompson of The Atlantic has noted.
Technology use is not the sole cause of these trends. Modern parenting strategies, among other factors, play a role as well. But digital technology — be it social media, video games, text messaging or other online activity — plays a strong role, many experts say.
“If you’re not getting some outdoor relief time and enough sleep — and you can almost stop at not enough sleep — any human being is challenged,” Matt said. “When you get the pubescent brain involved in that equation, you are talking about somebody being really, really challenged to feel contented and peaceful and happy with the world around them.”
The role of any specific social-media platform or behavior may remain unknown, but the larger story about American adolescents and their emotional struggles is less mysterious.
“They have too much screen time, they’re not sleeping, on phones all the time,” Dr. Melissa Dennison, a pediatrician in central Kentucky who sees many unhappy adolescents, told Matt. Dennison regularly encourages her patients to take walks outdoors or attend church.
It’s true that the decline of in-person interactions has had a few silver linings. Today’s adolescents are less likely to use tobacco, drink alcohol or get pregnant. But the net effect of less socializing is negative. Most human beings struggle when they are not spending time in the company of others.
The Covid-19 pandemic, of course, has exacerbated isolation, loneliness and depression. In December, the U.S. surgeon general warned of a “devastating” mental health crisis among America’s youth.
A 12-year-old patient of Dr. Dennison in Kentucky.Annie Flanagan for The New York Times
I find Covid to be a particularly relevant comparison. Over the past two-plus years, millions of American parents have demonstrated intense concern for their children by trying to protect them from Covid. Fortunately, Covid happens to be mild for the vast majority of children, causing neither severe illness nor long-term symptoms. One sign of that: Young children, not yet eligible for vaccination, are at considerably less risk on average than vaccinated people over 65.
Still, I understand why so many parents remain anxious. Covid is new and scary. It taps into parents’ fierce protective instincts.
What makes less sense to me is why our society has done so little to protect children from the apparent damages of ubiquitous digital media. They are almost certainly larger for most children than the threat from Covid.

New Life 5k Trail Run on 5/7 updates

From Todd Dimmick –

New teams enter the New Life 5k Trail Run on May 7th

New Life is excited to host its 5th annual Trail Run on Saturday, May 7th on the Medfield State Hospital grounds (at Hospital Rd. & Service Dr., Medfield, MA). The route winds through the beautiful Charles River Reservation, and the event is open to runners, walkers and everyone in between. Many teams have already entered the Trail Run, including A Team, Eliot Church XC, GNRC, Iwaki America, MAKT, Millis UCC on the MOVE, Shamrock Shuffle, Soles of Medfield, UCC Medfield, Unicorn Amazing, and Westwood First Parish Church. These teams include runners from across eastern Massachusetts. New teams are welcome and are easy to set up. 

To celebrate being back in person after two years of virtual runs, New Life has partnered with the Cultural Alliance of Medfield to provide live music on race day. Also, the Furniture Matters club of Medfield High School will introduce a Kids Fun Run for children 4-10 years old.

Trail Run registration is open at www.newlifefb.org/5ktrailrun. Registration is $30 until May 5; and $35 on race day. On-site Kids Fun Run registration will be $5 (cash or check). There is a $5 group discount for teams of four or more when the registrations are made at the same time.  On-site registration opens at 7:30 on race day. The Kids Fun Run starts at 9:00, and the Trail Run starts at 9:30, with live music to follow. The first 300 people to register will receive a t-shirt on race day.

The Trail Run benefits New Life Furniture Bank of MA and its mission to provide essential home furnishings to those in need. The Medfield-based not-for-profit organization operates a Walpole Donation Center, and serves the MetroWest and Greater Boston area. New Life provides a meaningful option for folks who are downsizing, renovating or disposing of a loved one’s property.

Those interested in being a sponsor, volunteering, donating home furnishings, or making a financial contribution are encouraged to visit www.newlifefb.org.


Eagle Scouts Karl Ericson, Antonio King & Jan Passas

Troop 89 held an Eagle Scout Court of Honor yesterday for Karl Ericson, Tito King, and Jani Passas (left to right) at the UCC. Lots of accomplishments of the scouts and their families were celebrated. Great event.

MCAP interviewing MHS students

Medfield Cares About Prevention (MCAP) is currently seeking 10-12 high school-aged volunteers to participate in one-on-one interviews with the substance use prevention coordinator or another Medfield Outreach staff about substance use in Medfield.  Students will not be asked about their own personal substance use or behaviors, but only to reflect upon what they see in their community. All information gathered during these interviews will be anonymized (no one will know who said what). Furthermore, the information collected will serve to help our MCAP coalition design impactful prevention strategies. These interviews will take anywhere from 30 minutes to one hour and are available both in person or via Zoom. All interviews will take place during the first three weeks of November.

If interested, please fill out this google form. If the student is under 18 years old at the time of the interview, parent/guardian consent is required. Consent forms will be emailed after they fill out the google form.

Thank you so much for taking the time to read this email!

Warmly,

Meri

Meri Haas

Pronouns: She, Her, Hers (what’s this?)

Substance Use Prevention Coordinator, Medfield Outreach

Physical Address: 88R South Street

Mailing Address: 459 Main Street

Medfield, MA 02052

(508) 359-7121 x4

mhaas@medfield.net

medfieldcares.org

Angel Run

The Angel Run is coming!

Last call for shirts!

The Medfield Foundation Angel Run will be held on Sunday, December 5. It’s a 5K / Run / Walk community “fun raiser” and family event. The route is filled with decorations and festive highlights. Bring your friends, the kids, the dog, the stroller and Grandma too. Wear your festive holiday gear and and help raise funds for Medfield families in need. 

Early Bird Registration is $25 and includes a commemorative shirt, but ends soon on November 1.  

Standard Registration is $30 and runs until November 19, but does NOT include a shirt. 

Go to MedfieldFoundation.org for more info and to sign up.

Please spread the word!

We hope you’ll join us!

PROTECT TEEN DRIVERS

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PETERSON | Law
Osler “Pete” Peterson
617-969-1500
May 2021
Attorney Photo

Parents Key to Safe Teen Drivers

Every parent knows that feeling of dread when handing over car keys to a teenager. Rightfully so, as the number one threat to a teen’s safety is driving or riding in a car with a teen driver. The good news: Research shows teens actually listen to their parents more than peers when it comes to driving. Thus, parents can play a significant role in protecting teen drivers from serious injury or death. Leading by example, driving with your teen, understanding the eight danger zones, and creating a parent-teen driving agreement – all covered in this month’s newsletter – are a great place to start. Continue reading.

teens in car
Protect Teen Drivers This Summer with Our Safety Tips

School’s out for summer
School’s out forever

School’s out with fever
School’s out completely


Summer mania – as immortalized in this iconic 70s teen anthem by rocker Alice Cooper – is almost here. Along with it will come a flood of teen drivers anxious to hang out with friends, start summer jobs and make up for all those good times lost to COVID-19 restrictions. Many challenges here for parents, but especially motor vehicle crashes – the leading cause of accidental death for teens. READ MORE


BY THE NUMBERS
6-a-Day

Six teens 16 to 19 die every day from motor vehicle crash injuries and are three times more likely to be in a fatal crash than older drivers. READ MORE


VIDEO BOOKMARK

Best Vehicles for Teens

Best choices, good choices ranging from $5,000 to nearly $20,000 from IIHS and Consumer Reports. VIEW VIDEO


TEENS DRIVING DISTRACTED
Young adult and teen drivers are most at risk for distracted driving, according to the Centers for Disease Control. READ MORE
 

THE DOCKET
GET TOWN OF MEDFIELD INFORMATION AT MY BLOG

2020 Virtual Angel Run & Fundraiser

2020 Virtual Angel Run & Fundraiser

Join us for the 15th year of The MFi Angel Run, we’re going Virtual this year! Run anytime, anywhere between the dates of Thursday, November 26th (Thanksgiving Day) through Sunday, December 6th, 2020 to support the MFi Angel Run and maintain a safe physical distance.

Your registration donation to the MFi Angel Run directly supports residents in need right here in Medfield and this year that need is greater than ever. The Angel Run helps raise thousands of dollars that is put back into the community to help people who have come upon hard times. Your registration helps make a difference in the lives of so many people. If a virtual 5K is not your thing, please register as a donation to the MFi during this unprecedented time.

Registration for the virtual Angel Run is now open