Category Archives: Teens

Volunteers Needed for the 2018 Holiday Stroll

From Diane Borrelli of the Medfield Cultural Alliance –

camfinal26001

Volunteers Needed for the 2018 Holiday Stroll

 

The Cultural Alliance of Medfield is seeking volunteers for the 4th annual Holiday StrollFriday December 7, between 3:30 and 9:30pm, we’ll need volunteer ‘greeters’ in 2 hour shifts.

Greeting duties include smiling, welcoming visitors, tallying head counts, helping some artists set up/break down booths, and providing general event information to visitors. It’s fun, social, and easy, and you work in pairs, so sign up with a spouse or friend!

Click here for information on time slots, and the link to “Sign Up Genius”. And, visit www.medfieldculture.org and check out the “2018 Holiday Stroll” tab to learn more about this annual Medfield event!

Thank you,

Diane Borrelli
D.frances@verizon.net
MedfieldCulture.org

2018 Holiday Stroll Medfield

From Diane Borrelli of the MedfieldCulture.org –

Holiday Stroll 2018

2018 Holiday Stroll Medfield

(Medfield MA): The Cultural Alliance of Medfield (CAM) announces its fourth annual Holiday Stroll on Dec. 7, 2018 from 4 – 9 pm. This is a festive family event that takes place at seventeen venues along Main Street (Route 109), North Meadows Road (Route 27), North Street and the Dwight Derby House on Frairy Street. Included are 40 juried artisans at three main locations, an outdoor ice sculpture demonstration, food vendors, carolers, photos with Santa and M.E.M.O.’s outdoor tree lighting ceremony. All events are within walking distance, FREE admission and parking nearby. For more information visit https://medfieldculture.org/holiday-stroll-2018/

QR signs are up and running on Medfield’s historic buildings

This is a really cool and a really useful Eagle Scout project by Caillian Sheehy.  Given our critical mass of historic houses in town, Medfield has an opportunity to be a destination for those interested in things historic.  We just need a good “Medfield Trail” for visitors to follow, and now we have a good start on that history trail.

The material below was an email from David Temple of the Medfield Historical Society.  I believe that the Medfield Historical Society funded Caillan’s project.

Dwight-Derby House-3

QR signs are up and running on Medfield’s historic buildings

For his Eagle Scout project, Caillian Sheehy created signs (using the library’s 3D printer) with QR codes on the Peak House, the Dwight-Derby House, the old meetinghouse, the grist mill, the Baptist church, the historical society, Vine Lake cemetery, and the Inness studio.

 

When you go to any of these historic sites, get out your smart phone and use it to read the QR code.  (If you don’t already have one, free downloadable QR code reader apps are widely available.) You’ll be led to the historical society web site, with more information about each historical site, and you can play the one-minute audio intro that Caillian recorded for each site.

 

When Caillian first approached me, I thought it was a great idea – why didn’t we think of this before? But Caillian had the idea and made it happen. Bravo, Caillian!

 

In your reply, please include my original message.

David F. Temple
President, Medfield Historical Society

Co-chair, Medfield Historical Commission

New Life’s 5K

This from Susan Maritan –

Registration is Open for New Life’s 5K Fundraising Run/Walk

New Life Furniture Bank is excited to announce its 1st Annual New Life 5K Trail Run. This fundraising event will be held at 9 AM on Saturday, May 5th at the scenic Medfield State Hospital grounds in Medfield, MA.

Come out for a day of competition and fun in the fresh air at a beautiful and natural venue for the area’s most avid runners, walkers and everyone in between. (Pets welcome too!) The New Life 5K Trail Run is open to the public, and all ages are encouraged to run, jog or walk in what promises to be an annual family event not to be missed!

Registration is open now! The first 200 registrants will receive a free t-shirt. To register or for additional information, go to www.newlifefb.org/5ktrailrun.

New Life Furniture Bank is a 501(c)3 non-profit that collects high-quality gently-used furniture and household essentials and makes them available at no cost to individuals and families in extraordinary need.

New Life has made a difference in the lives of thousands of people transitioning from a homeless environment, victims of fire, military veterans and refugees, among others.  Visit us at newlifefb.org.

New Life 5k

Mental health referral service

The William James Interface Referral Service

The School Department and the town signed up with The William James Interface Referral Service, which is a mental health referral service for any resident.  Interface phones are answered by mental health professionals, and they match callers with appropriate clinical staff.  Interface does the legwork, and makes referrals based on the variables. The service became available for Medfield residents November 1.  See the Interface website for other resources – William James Interface Referral Service
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Screen time and depression correlate

Author Jean Twenge Professor of Psychology, San Diego State University Academic rigor, journalistic flair Around 2012, something started going wrong in the lives of teens. In just the five years between 2010 and 2015, the number of U.S. teens who felt useless and joyless – classic symptoms of depression – surged 33 percent in large national surveys. Teen suicide attempts increased 23 percent. Even more troubling, the number of 13- to 18-year-olds who committed suicide jumped 31 percent. In a new paper published in Clinical Psychological Science, my colleagues and I found that the increases in depression, suicide attempts and suicide appeared among teens from every background – more privileged and less privileged, across all races and ethnicities and in every region of the country. All told, our analysis found that the generation of teens I call “iGen” – those born after 1995 – is much more likely to experience mental health issues than pimchawee November 14, 2017 9.36am EST With teen mental health deteriorating over five years, there's a likely culprit https://theconversation.com/with-teen-mental-health-deteriorating-over-f... 1 of 3 11/24/2017, 4:21 PM their millennial predecessors. What happened so that so many more teens, in such a short period of time, would feel depressed, attempt suicide and commit suicide? After scouring several large surveys of teens for clues, I found that all of the possibilities traced back to a major change in teens’ lives: the sudden ascendance of the smartphone. All signs point to the screen Because the years between 2010 to 2015 were a period of steady economic growth and falling unemployment, it’s unlikely that economic malaise was a factor. Income inequality was (and still is) an issue, but it didn’t suddenly appear in the early 2010s: This gap between the rich and poor had been widening for decades. We found that the time teens spent on homework barely budged between 2010 and 2015, effectively ruling out academic pressure as a cause. However, according to the Pew Research Center, smartphone ownership crossed the 50 percent threshold in late 2012 – right when teen depression and suicide began to increase. By 2015, 73 percent of teens had access to a smartphone. Not only did smartphone use and depression increase in tandem, but time spent online was linked to mental health issues across two different data sets. We found that teens who spent five or more hours a day online were 71 percent more likely than those who spent less than an hour a day to have at least one suicide risk factor (depression, thinking about suicide, making a suicide plan or attempting suicide). Overall, suicide risk factors rose significantly after two or more hours a day of time online. Of course, it’s possible that instead of time online causing depression, depression causes more time online. But three other studies show that is unlikely (at least, when viewed through social media use). Two followed people over time, with both studies finding that spending more time on social media led to unhappiness, while unhappiness did not lead to more social media use. A third randomly assigned participants to give up Facebook for a week versus continuing their usual use. Those who avoided Facebook reported feeling less depressed at the end of the week. The argument that depression might cause people to spend more time online doesn’t also explain why depression increased so suddenly after 2012. Under that scenario, more teens became depressed for an unknown reason and then started buying smartphones, which doesn’t seem too logical. What’s lost when we’re plugged in Even if online time doesn’t directly harm mental health, it could still adversely affect it in indirect ways, especially if time online crowds out time for other activities. With teen mental health deteriorating over five years, there's a likely culprit https://theconversation.com/with-teen-mental-health-deteriorating-over-f... 2 of 3 11/24/2017, 4:21 PM Mental health Suicide Depression Generations Smartphones Friendship Screen time teen depression Teens For example, while conducting research for my book on iGen, I found that teens now spend much less time interacting with their friends in person. Interacting with people face to face is one of the deepest wellsprings of human happiness; without it, our moods start to suffer and depression often follows. Feeling socially isolated is also one of the major risk factors for suicide. We found that teens who spent more time than average online and less time than average with friends in person were the most likely to be depressed. Since 2012, that’s what has occurred en masse: Teens have spent less time on activities known to benefit mental health (in-person social interaction) and more time on activities that may harm it (time online). Teens are also sleeping less, and teens who spend more time on their phones are more likely to not be getting enough sleep. Not sleeping enough is a major risk factor for depression, so if smartphones are causing less sleep, that alone could explain why depression and suicide increased so suddenly. Depression and suicide have many causes: Genetic predisposition, family environments, bullying and trauma can all play a role. Some teens would experience mental health problems no matter what era they lived in. But some vulnerable teens who would otherwise not have had mental health issues may have slipped into depression due to too much screen time, not enough face-to-face social interaction, inadequate sleep or a combination of all three. It might be argued that it’s too soon to recommend less screen time, given that the research isn’t completely definitive. However, the downside to limiting screen time – say, to two hours a day or less – is minimal. In contrast, the downside to doing nothing – given the possible consequences of depression and suicide – seems, to me, quite high. It’s not too early to think about limiting screen time; let’s hope it’s not too late. With teen mental health deteriorating over five years, there's a likely culprit https://theconversation.com/with-teen-mental-health-deteriorating-over-f... 3 of 3 11/24/2017, 4:21 PMWith teen mental health deteriorating over five years, there's a likely culprit_Page_2With teen mental health deteriorating over five years, there's a likely culprit_Page_3

MetroWest Adolescent Health Survey Report

MHS sigh

The full MetroWest Adolescent Health Survey Report has been put on-line by the schools.  I am not sure if this is the first year the full report has been made available, as I know in the past only summaries were distributed.  Great to see the actual data.

A few things I noticed from scanning it:

  • fair amount of alcohol and marijuana use
  • lots and lots of stress
  • some pressured to provide sex
  • few parents control and/or discuss on-line use and time

http://medfield.net/district-information/mwahs.html

I was interested to learn at a recent Medfield Cares About Prevention (MCAP) (www.MedfieldCares.org) meeting that the kids generally do not believe the data about alcohol and drug use affecting their brains, based on their push back to Dr. Ruth Potee when she was presenting the facts to them at her recent talk at Medfield High School.