Category Archives: Children

2020 Virtual Angel Run & Fundraiser

2020 Virtual Angel Run & Fundraiser

Join us for the 15th year of The MFi Angel Run, we’re going Virtual this year! Run anytime, anywhere between the dates of Thursday, November 26th (Thanksgiving Day) through Sunday, December 6th, 2020 to support the MFi Angel Run and maintain a safe physical distance.

Your registration donation to the MFi Angel Run directly supports residents in need right here in Medfield and this year that need is greater than ever. The Angel Run helps raise thousands of dollars that is put back into the community to help people who have come upon hard times. Your registration helps make a difference in the lives of so many people. If a virtual 5K is not your thing, please register as a donation to the MFi during this unprecedented time.

Registration for the virtual Angel Run is now open

MCAP hosts hike for kids

Tweet today from Medfield Cares About Prevention (MCAP) –
Medfield Cares About Prevention – MCAP
@MedfieldCares
Itching to get out of the house? Want to hang out with kids your own age? You’re in luck! *Join other youth and the Medfield Outreach department for a relaxing walk in the Rocky Woods Reservation!* To Register Visit forms.gle/u7auKc2FbomoLe Email medfieldyouthoutreach@medfield.net
5:06 PM · Aug 11, 2020Twitter Web App

PSB and MFC – food collection & fun this Saturday

Two of Medield’s best, Park Street Books and the Medfield Food Cupboard team up this Saturday  10-4 –

little blue truck

little blue truck fund raiser.jpg

Come see the Little Blue Truck and Donate Food

Stop by Medfield’s beloved Park Street Books on Saturday, May 23 between the hours of 10 AM and 4 PM. Participants are encouraged to bring their camera and take a photo with the adorable blue truck as described in the popular children’s book The Little Blue Truck — a story by Alice Schertle about friends helping friends. While stopping by for a fun photo, please consider bringing a bag of food to donate to the Medfield Food Cupboard. Requested kid-friendly food items include: peanut butter, jelly, cereal, crackers, packets of oatmeal and cookies. Donors are encouraged to post their cute photos on Medfield Food Cupboard’s Facebook page. The rain date is set for Sunday, May 24.

MFC logo

New Life Virtual 5k

New Life Virtual 5k

 

New Life Still Running with a Virtual 5k

By Tod Dimmick

The pandemic has affected every community event this spring, including the annual New Life 5k Trail Run, an event that raises more than 20% of the New Life Furniture Bank’s budget. This Massachusetts charity serves nearly 700 hundred households every year, including individuals, families, single mothers, seniors and veterans, as they come out of homelessness. New Life collects high-quality gently-used furniture and household essentials that are then made available at no cost to individuals and families in need.

Faced with the challenge of having to cancel its annual 5k Trail Run, New Life sought creative and safe ways to hold their event, which raises funds that are critical to New Life’s ability to serve its clients. “The economic impact of COVID-19 is hitting our clients hard,” said Rich Purnell, Executive Director of New Life. He added that, “in the coming months, we anticipate a surge in requests as many families will be displaced from their homes.”

new life 2020

After careful thought, the trail run organizing committee announced a new “virtual 5k.”  Runners and walkers register the same way they would for a conventional run, at www.newlifefb.org/virtual5k, where they can also create or join a team. Participants create their own 5k route, or use fitness apps like MapMyRun and Strava. Teams or individuals may even choose to row 5k on erg machines, or to bike. Entrants complete their personal 5k anytime between April 13 and May 10, and runners and walkers log their times on Racewire. On May 11, results will be posted and awards will be given in traditional categories, as well as in new, creative categories like most creative course.

Ron Yates, co-founder of the New Life Furniture Bank, said “we recognize that this is a totally new way to do something like this, and that is part of the fun. The Virtual 5k could bring even more people to the event because it is so easy to participate from anywhere, at any time. A team could be made up of family members, high school or college cross country teams looking for fitness and competition, an office group, you name it!”

The organizers also believe that the event offers an important opportunity for supporters who, especially in these challenging times, seek ways to do something positive and proactive while still being safe. “Folks joining the Virtual 5k not only support the New Life mission, they also are a welcome part of a community doing something that matters,” said Yates. “That’s especially important right now. And, running in the virtual 5k is a healthy thing to do. Everyone wins.”

Carmen Luisi of Holliston was the top female runner in the 2019 Trail Run (at age 13!), and she’s looking forward to the Virtual 5k this time around. “This is a very important cause, even greater now because people are struggling financially with the current pandemic,” she said.

Dan Haley, of Wayland, said he will run the Virtual 5k this year with his family. “My wife and 12 year old daughter and I had a wonderful time at last year’s 5K,” he said. “With everything in the near term shutting down, we were excited to hear that the New Life event is going virtual. One of our goals as a family as we navigate this strange, temporary reality is to continuously reach out to help others. Another is to keep getting exercise! So this checks both boxes, and gives us something worthwhile and active to do as a family.”

Mark Silva is a partner at the law firm Choate, Hall & Stewart LLP, a sponsor of the event. He plans to run the race for the first time this year. “At a time when we’re all cooped up in our homes looking for something to do, looking for a way to help,” he said, “the 5K is giving us the opportunity to support an incredible organization… while being completely flexible on approach.” He added, “We plan on doing the 5K as a family this year – my wife will run and I am planning to bike the 5K with the kids.”

Kristin Chisum of Wayland will also run the Virtual 5k again with her son Luke. “We are thrilled that the race committee has come up with a way for the race to go on,” she said. “We live near the woods near Walden Pond so that’s where we’ll be.” She added: “I know that we will finish our 5K again this year with a feeling of gratitude – thankful for this group of people that have found a way to change people’s lives and have provided this 5K as a way for us to do our own little part.”

Participants in the New Life Virtual 5k will be encouraged to post photos of their participation with the hashtag #NewLifeStillRunning or send an email to trailrun@newlifefb.org. The registration page reads, in part, “It is our hope that sharing everyone’s fun photos and stories will bring joy to our New Life community and inspire other people far and wide to join the cause.” The organizers made it clear that they want more ideas from supporters about how to make the event fun and accessible to all. Ideas are coming in already, including filming clips of virtual bystanders cheering on the runners, and asking kids to create colorful yard signs.

The Medfield-based not-for-profit organization operates a Donation Center in Walpole, and serves the MetroWest and Greater Boston area.

To register, go to www.newlifefb.org/virtual5k.  Those interested in being a sponsor or making a financial contribution are encouraged to visit www.newlifefb.org.

 

Join the Angel Run team!

angel-run-2016

The Medfield Foundation’s Angel Run is seeking individuals to assist with the following parts of the annual family friendly race in December, to work with seasoned volunteers:

  • Marketing co-chair
  • Post Race Party co-chair

Join the team, share the fun, and do some good for your hometown!

Email to info@medfieldfoundation.org with interest.

angel run runners

 

Medfield Foundation launches appeal for summer camp fund

MFi-camp1

Medfield Foundation launches appeal for summer camp fund

Many adults and children have happy memories of summer camp. From a traditional experience playing in the woods, swimming in a pond or making arts and crafts to skill building and other types of specialized camps, many Medfielders cherish these summer camp experiences and the friends they made. How would you feel if you never had the opportunity to go to camp?

Before the summer camp season begins, the Medfield Foundation board wants the town to know that there are a significant number of local families whose children yearn to attend camp, but simply can’t afford it. Due to difficult financial situations at home, many children are unable to attend summer camps. It can be challenging to grow up in an affluent community such as Medfield and not have access to the development opportunities, fun and life-long friendships that summer camps can provide.

After first responding to a specific significant need three years ago, the MFi board established the Summer Camp Fund. This fund has become a popular way for people with the financial means to do so to give back to the Medfield community. The MFi board is now in its third year of the fund, and, as in years past, is looking to raise $5,000 to assist as many families as possible to give their children the ability to attend summer camp.

The Medfield Foundation is asking people to make a tax-deductible donation to help Medfield children attend summer camp. There are two easy ways to make a donation:

Send a check to: Medfield Foundation PO Box 745 Medfield, MA 02052. Please make the check out to Medfield Foundation, Inc. and write “CAMP” in the memo line.

Use this link to donate: http://medfieldfoundation.org/donate/

If you would like more information before donating, contact Rose Colleran, Medfield Foundation Summer Camp Fund Chair (617-947-4896 or camp@medfieldfoundation.org) or Medfield Foundation Treasurer, Abby Marble (508-361-9825 or treasurer@medfieldfoundation.org).

The Medfield Foundation is a 100 percent volunteer run 501(c)(3) nonprofit charitable corporation whose mission is to enrich the lives of Medfield residents, build a stronger community, and facilitate raising and allocation of private funds for public needs in the town of Medfield. Since its inception in 2001, MFi has raised more than $3 million to support community-wide initiatives in Medfield.

MFi was founded on the realization that some residents were interested in contributing more than town taxes to support projects and services that would enrich life in Medfield. Annual fundraising revenue varies each year as the initiatives and needs in the town change. Please go to http://medfieldfoundation.org/

MCAP Receives $625K Grant

MCAP Logo_1C_300

MCAP Announces Receipt of $625K Federal Grant

The Medfield Cares About Prevention (MCAP) substance abuse prevention coalition, a Medfield Foundation Initiative, announced that it was awarded a FY 2019 Drug-Free Communities Support Program grant in the amount of $625,000 over five years by the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, in cooperation with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. This grant will allow the coalition to hire a full-time prevention coordinator who will carry out evidence-based strategies aimed at preventing youth substance use in the Medfield community. Superintendent of the Medfield Public Schools and MCAP coalition member, Dr. Jeff Marsden, responded to the news of the grant award: "I'm so happy for our kids and community that we will have someone dedicated to substance use prevention. The collective efforts of MCAP really came through for our community and our district looks forward to this important work." Medfield is honored to receive this grant and is prepared to launch a proactive and comprehensive effort to decrease substance use. The goals of the Medfield Cares About Prevention coalition are to establish and strengthen community collaboration in support of local efforts to decrease youth substance use. The coalition will seek to achieve its goals by implementing the following strategies: providing information and support, enhancing skills, providing incentives and disincentives for youth substance use, changing the physical environment, and modifying policies. The coalition will specifically target alcohol and electronic vapor products and will promote positive alternatives to substance use through community collaboration. This successful grant application was made possible by the tireless efforts of coalition members, as well as by a coalition consultant, Amanda Decker of Bright Solutions Consulting. MCAP was able to contract with Bright Solutions Consulting thanks to a generous grant from the Medfield Foundation Legacy Fund, an endowed fund of the Foundation for MetroWest. Securing this mini grant of $5,000 positioned MCAP to secure grant writing consultation services and set the coalition up for a successful award of the DFC grant.

Angel Run Early-Bird Registration Ends November 8th

View this email in your browser

Greetings Angel Run Friends,

Join us for the 14th running (or walking) of the Angel Run on Sunday, December 8 at 12:30pm.

Early registration ends on Friday, November 8th so register now for $25.00 per person and receive your commemorative shirt.  You can still register online after November 8th, however the price goes up to $30.00 per person and you will not receive a shirt.

REGISTRATION LINK:  https://www.medfieldfoundation.org/mfi-angel-run.  

The Angel Run course is a USATF certified 5K. The Angel Run uses chip timing to ensure accurate results for all participants. The race begins and ends at Medfield High School.  There will be a special separate starting corral for competitive runners. You decide if you should belong to that group, be sure to note this on your registration.

We hope to see you there (with bells on)!Cheers,

The MFi Angel Run Team

Youth Outreach – clinical services questioned

mfi youth & rec

Medfield Youth Outreach – future of clinical services questioned

At the Select Board meeting Thursday night, I was surprised when the Board refused to reappoint the Medfield Youth Outreach Advisory Board, created in 2016, with one member suggesting that it did not even need to be a town board, but could instead operate informally.

Additional surprise came when Kristine Trierweiler reported that the Select Board needed to resolve the future existence of the Medfield Youth Outreach clinical services prior to her posting to hire the new Director of the Medfield Youth Outreach, a position that has been vacant since Dawn Alcott left in the spring.

I am informed that there is still unresolved concern over whether the Medfield Youth Outreach should continue to exist in its current form, namely whether Medfield Youth Outreach should provide clinical counseling services, or whether Medfield Youth Outreach should instead just be referring all counseling clients to services provided by third parties.  Medfield Youth Outreach has been providing clinical services to Medfield’s youth for the past forty years, and a question has been raised as to whether that should continue.

There are reportedly also concerns about potential liability and HIPAA compliance –

  • note 1: any town service can create liability, and therefore the town buys insurance.  Also, both Medfield Youth Outreach employees carried their own insurance as well;
  • note 2: Medfield Youth Outreach has been doing clinical counseling for the forty years of its existence.
  • note 3: any health care worker must comply with HIPAA.

The Select Board had extensive discussions about the Medfield Youth Outreach program at the Board’s June 18 meeting with both the Interim Director of Medfield Youth Outreach and members of the Medfield Youth Outreach Advisory Board. I thought the Select Board had resolved all these MYO issues that night, and that the hiring was proceeding.

All these matters will reportedly be discussed by the Select Board, again, at its meeting on September 17, and hopefully this time a resolution will be reached that allows for the posting and prompt hiring of a new MYO Director.

Help in dealing with the shootings

Received this afternoon from Carol Read, who appeared to get it from Larry Berkowitz, Director of the Riverside Trauma Center, who is also a frequent lecturer in town for the Medfield Coalition for Suicide Prevention –

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Trauma response resources: (1) ChildMind Institute (2) Riverside Trauma Center

Child Mind Institute:

 https://childmind.org/about-us/  Child Mind homepage

https://childmind.org/guide/helping-children-cope-traumatic-event/ Guide to Helping Children Cope After a Traumatic Event, PDF attached

 

 riverside-community-care

Riverside Trauma Center: Children and trauma, resource links, article, attached and post from Larry Berkowitz, Director, copied below.

https://riversidetraumacenter.org/  Trauma Center homepage

https://riversidetraumacenter.org/trauma-center-resources/  Resources, talking to children, youth and adolescents, coping strategies and practicing self-care after traumatic events.  Talking with childrenPDF attached

 

Larry Berkowitz

Yesterday at 6:41 AM

One again we are confronted by the horror and tragedy of mass killing… See More Below

One again we are confronted by the horror and tragedy of mass killings. The news from Ohio and Texas leads to a wide range of reactions: fear, anger, sadness, distress, confusion, disgust, to name just a few emotions. But it is not just emotions- our reactions take on many forms including recurrent thoughts about the events, shattered assumptions about our safety, concentration difficulties, bodily reactions such as feeling exhausted or whatever our “usual” somatic reactions are. For people who have been directly impacted by violence, we know their reactions may be more pronounced, and we have many resources on our website that we hope people will find helpful and suggestions on how to talk with children about these awful events. http://riversidetraumacenter.org/trauma-center-resources/

My greatest concern in these past two days has been the frequency with which I’ve heard people say “we’re not safe anywhere” or “this is the new normal.” I strongly believe we must reject the attitude that we live a new normal, as that implies a sense of learned helplessness, a conviction that nothing can be done. While we may feel vulnerable, we are certainly not helpless. I urge each of us to take personal responsibility for taking some action in response to these latest mass killings. Use your voice! Write a letter, write an email, make phone calls, use social media, contact your local, state and national representatives and express your opinion and concerns, whatever they may be. I am reminded of Margaret Mead’s oft cited quote, “never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”

 

In peace,

Larry Berkowitz

Director, Riverside Trauma Center

Riverside Trauma Center www.riversidetraumacenter.org Talking with Your Children About Traumatic Events Here are some tips for talking with your children when they have witnessed or heard about traumatic events: Listen to your children: Ask your children what they have heard about the traumatic event. What do they think happened? Let them tell you in their own words and answer their questions. Do not assume you know what they are feeling or what their questions will be. The easiest way to have this conversation might be while they are engaged in an activity: drawing, sitting on a swing, or driving with you in the car. Details that may be obvious to adults may not be to children. Be truthful, but don’t tell them more information than they can handle for their age. Focus on their safety: Once you understand their perception of the traumatic event, be clear that you will keep them safe and let them know adults (school, police, etc.) are working hard to make sure they will stay safe. Pay attention to your reactions: Your children will be watching you carefully and taking their cues from you. If you can manage your anxiety about the traumatic event, your children will be more easily reassured. Monitor your child’s access to media: It will help if young children do not watch news reports or see the front page of the newspaper. Young children who watch a traumatic event on the TV news may think the event is still ongoing or happening again. Watch for behavior changes: Your children may show you through their behavior that they are still struggling with what they have heard or seen. They may have physical complaints or regressive behaviors often including nightmares, insomnia, or bedwetting. They may feel guilty that they are responsible for the event, and need to be reassured that they are not responsible. Maintain your routines: Sticking to your daily structure of activities—mealtimes, bedtime rituals, etc.—reduces anxiety and helps children feel more in control. Keep the door open: Encourage your children to come to you with any questions or concerns and do not assume the questions will stop after a few days or even a few weeks. Let them know their fears and questions are normal and you will always make time for them. Remind them all questions are welcome. Consider this a teachable moment: For older children, this traumatic event may lead to a discussion about ways they can help others who have experienced a tragedy. You can also ask them if they know how to keep themselves safe when they are away from home. Traumatic events make us feel like we have lost control, so any constructive activities we engage in make us feel less vulnerable.