Category Archives: Open space

Survey for Medfield Open Space and Recreation Plan (OSRP)

From Mary McCarthy, Chair of the Conservation Commission –

town seal

This is for anyone who may have missed the other invites to complete the survey for whatever reason. Sorry if you have seen this already!

 

Friends and Neighbors,

If you attended the Town Wide Master Plan Public Participation Forum/Visioning on Sunday October 20, you know that the availability of Open Space is one of the most highly valued features of living in Medfield.

The Medfield Open Space and Recreation Plan (OSRP) Committee, in collaboration with the Medfield Conservation Commission and Parks and Recreation, is putting the finishing touches on its updated OSRP. (A state approved OSRP is necessary for the town to be eligible to receive certain state funding.) A final step in this process is completion of a survey by residents on use of Open Space in town.

Please take a few minutes to complete the brief survey located here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/KTS5NYY

Thank you for your participation!

Best regards,

Mary

***

Mary McCarthy

Medfield Conservation Commission

Town Wide Master Planning Committee

New Life 5k Trail Run 2019

From Tod Dimmick –

new life run 2019-3

Dear Medfield Community,

The members of the New Life 5k Trail Run Committee would like to thank our community for their continuing support of the New Life 5k Trail Run, now in its 2nd year.

Saturday, May 11th, featured perfect weather, an enthusiastic turnout, and impressive fund-raising. The Trail Run took a winding route through and between the historic Medfield State Hospital buildings, across verdant fields, through the woods, down along the scenic Charles River and back up to the hospital grounds. The event raised funds and awareness for New Life Furniture Bank of MA. RaceWire (an online race registration and race timing company) provided participants with official times and finish-line photos. We give special thanks to our lead sponsors: Eastern Bank, New Balance, and Hometown Weekly; our Chip Timing Sponsors: Choate, Frank Webb Home, Rich & Susan Holbrook, and the Louis & Mary Kay Smith Family Foundation; as well as many other generous sponsors and in-kind donors. We greatly appreciate their support.  Hard-working volunteers helped make the entire event run smoothly. Close to 300 runners and walkers participated, including individuals and teams. Music and outdoor games entertained all. We are very grateful to the Town of Medfield for the use of such an idyllic setting.

Carmen Luisi was the overall winner for the females and Andy Gardiner was the winner for the males. Visit newlifefb.org/5kphotos to view images of the race which capture the spirit of this fun event and its unique setting.

Executive Director Rich Purnell noted that these are exciting times at New Life. “We are growing quickly, and becoming an essential part of helping families transition out of homelessness or other forms of displacement,” he said. “The Trail Run was a great success. We raised funds to help us continue our mission and shared our organization with a wonderful group of people. We are so grateful to our sponsors and to those who participated.”

At New Life Furniture Bank of MA, we are proud to have served almost 1,900 households since our founding five years ago. Over this time period, we have provided not just 23,000 pieces of furniture, but helped to create a stable home for our clients and kept these items out of landfills. All of this has been made possible by the 800 volunteers who contributed 24,000 hours of their time and energy. Our Medfield-based not-for-profit organization operates a Donation Center in Walpole, and serves the MetroWest and Greater Boston area. New Life provides a meaningful option for local residents who are downsizing, renovating or disposing of a loved one’s property. Learn more about supporting, donating to, or volunteering for New Life Furniture Bank at newlifefb.org.

Thank you for being part of the New Life 5k Trail Run, an event we hope will become a growing community tradition. Stay tuned for updates next fall on the Third Annual 5k!

Sincerely,

The New Life Trail Run Committee

CPA – town missing out

The letter below that I received this week from the Norfolk Register of Deeds highlights for Medfield how, as a town, we all pay in to the Massachusetts Community Preservation Act (CPA) fund ($44,250 last year), but we get none of the monies or benefits back because we have not adopted the CPA.

The CPA is a self-imposed additional tax of from 1-3%, in exchange for which the town get state matching monies.   CPA monies have to be spent on one of three areas:

  • historic preservation
  • affordable housing
  • open space and recreation

My analysis has always been that where we already spend on those three things anyway, that by not adopting the CPA that we are merely forgoing the state matching monies.

The one time the CPA went to the annual town meeting (ATM), about ten years ago, it was defeated.

WILLIAM P. ODONNELL REGISTER OF DEEDS ASSISTANT RECORDER OF THE LAND COURT Selectman Osler L. Peterson Medfield Board of Selectmen  0 Copperwood Road Medfield, MA 02052 Dear Selectman Peterson, COUNTY OF NORFOLK COUNTY OF PRESIDENTS REGISTRY OF DEEDS NORFOLK REGISTRY DISTRICT OF THE L AND C O URT January 18, 2019 The fees for the Community Preservation Act are set by the State Legislature on land documents recorded here at the Norfolk County Registry of Deeds. l thought the chart on the reverse side would be of interest to you. It provides an illustration of the funds generated by the Community Preservation Act (CPA) in your community based on recorded real estate filings during the 2018 calendar year. The Community Preservation Act was signed into law on September 14, 2000. Today there are 175 Massachusetts communities that have adopted the Community Preservation Act, including this year the town of Plainville in Norfolk County. Just over 2.1 billion dollars has been raised to date statewide. The Registry of Deeds, at no additional cost to the Commonwealth or local communities, collects these revenues for the state once a document is recorded. The monies are then forwarded to the Massachusetts Department of Revenue on a monthly basi s. The funds collected by the Commonwealth are then redistributed back to the communities that have adopted the CPA through a variety of formulas. The Norfolk County Registry of Deeds which is located at 649 High Street, Dedham, is the principal office for real property in Norfolk County. The Registry is a resource for homeowners, title examiners, mortgage lenders, genealogists, municipalities and others with a need for secure, accurate, accessible land record information. For assistance please contact our Customer Service Center at (781) 461-6101 , or visit our website at www.norfolkdeeds.org. J hope you find this data to be timely, informative and useful. In the meantime, if I can be of assistance to you, please do not hesitate to contact me at 781-461-6116 or by email at registerodonnell@norfolkdeeds.org. I wish you a healthy New Year. WPO/aag Sincerely yours, "P~(}p~ William P. O'Donnell Norfolk County Register of Deeds 649 HIGH STREET. DEDHAM. MASSACHUSETTS 02026 TELEPH ONE : 781 ·46 I · 61 16 FAX 78 1 ·326·4246 EM A I L : registerodonnell@norlolkdeeds.org www .norfolkdeeds.org •~7SC ~ facebook.com/NorfolkDeeds ~ twitter.com/NorfolkDeeds YouiD youtube.com/NorfolkDeeds Linked rm linkedin.com/company/Norfolk·County·Registry·Of·Deeds (.@) @NorfolkDeeds NORFOLK COUNTY REGISTRY OF DEEDS •I COMMUNITY PRESERVATION ACT (CPA) SURCHARGES BY TOWN FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2018 TOWN TOTAL AVON $1~,450 BF.I ,IJNGHAM $66,660 BRAINTREE $112,570 BROOKLINE $150,350 CANTON $86,090 COHASSET $39,420 DEDHAM $83,650 DOVER $23,650 , FOXBOROUGH $58,270 FRANKLIN $110,350 •( HOLBROOK . $40,100 MEDFIET,n $44,150 MEDWAY $47,000 MILLIS $31,420 MILTON $86,060 NEEDHAM $103,370 NORFOLK $40,980 NORWOOD $80,170 PLAINVILLE $29,560 QUINCY $244,110 RANDOLPH $100,420 SHARON $56,740 STOUGHTON $96,000 WALPOLE $88,710 WELLESLEY $87,090 WESTWOOD $51,890 WEYMOUTH $200,460 WRENTHAM $47,530 II :''20190118-norfolk register of deeds-ltr from-cpa figures for 2018_page_2

New Life 5k – entry fee jumps Friday

 

From Susan Maritan –

The 5k registration fee for the run goes up on Friday, so we want to let people know NOW is the time to get the Early Bird pricing.

New Life 5k

Register Now for New Life’s 5k Walk/Run

Registration is open for New Life Furniture Bank’s “1st Annual New Life 5K Trail Run” on the grounds of the scenic Medfield State Hospital on Saturday, May 5th at 9 AM. The event is open to avid runners, joggers, or walkers looking for a beautiful spring stroll. This fun event is a great way to get out of the house and stretch your legs after a long winter while raising funds for New Life.

The event registration link is open at newlifefb.org. Register now because there are only about 50 free shirts left for the early registrants, and because the race fee, if paid on or before APRIL 5th, is $25; after April 5th it will be $30.

 

100% of the proceeds will benefit New Life Furniture Bank of MA.

For those runners interested in getting an official time, RaceWire is providing chip timing, and for those interested in fun and relaxation, there will be post-run refreshments and DJ music!

 

 

 

CPA needs to come to town

cpa

Medfield voted down the Massachusetts Community Preservation Act (CPA) at our annual town meeting (ATM), maybe 7-8 years ago, and as a result we have missed out on huge amounts of state CPA matching monies that we could have been using to pay for our open spaces, our historic preservation, or our affordable housing.  I hope that we can agree to finally adopt the CPA soon, as every year we are leaving state matching monies on the table, despite that we pay in to the Norfolk Registry of Deeds recording surcharges that create the pool of monies used for the matching funds.  Our payments are instead going to other towns in their matching monies.

In recent years, the matching monies have been so low from the registry surcharges that the legislature has annually supplemented the matching monies via an appropriation – almost half the cities and towns have adopted the CPA, so a lot of legislators are interested in keeping the CPA match high.

When we do adopt the CPA, since the whole reason to do so is to get the most state matching monies, we should adopt the highest level surcharge, which is 3%, because only those who agree to the 3% CPA surcharge get the most and largest state matches.

I have been asking for several years in a row to have an ATM warrant article to adopt the CPA, and I have been requested to not proceed by CPA proponents due to their not having educated the residents sufficiently.  This year I think we just need to go ahead, and expect that residents will understand that the CPA will save us money in the long run.  The Community Preservation Coalition website (www.communitypreservation.org) is excellent at explaining the CPA.

This article below about the CPA matching monies just issued was in my Massachusetts Department of Revenue newsletter this week –

==================================================================

FY18 Community Preservation Act (CPA) State Match Info
Lisa Krzywicki – Municipal Databank Director

On November 14th, the Division of Local Services (DLS) released the FY2018 CPA state match to the 162 communities that have adopted the CPA surcharge. The CPA allows a community to adopt a local surcharge of up to three percent that is added to real estate property tax bills. The purpose of the CPA is to help communities preserve open space and historic sites, create affordable housing and develop outdoor recreational facilities. The CPA statute, M.G.L. 44B, provides a state match to eligible communities from revenues collected by the registry of deeds for surcharges on fees charged for recording various documents.

In FY2018, the available balance in the CPA state trust fund was $26M, and the local surcharges committed by cities and towns totaled $120.9M, which provided for a 17.2 percent base state match. Chapter 44B provides for an additional state match if a community adopted a three percent surcharge or the “blended” CPA by voting a surcharge of at least one percent and appropriating other funds to the community preservation fund so that the total equals three percent of the real estate tax levy. For FY2018, 76 communities are eligible for the second round or equity distribution and third round surplus distribution. The equity and surplus distributions use population and equalized valuation (EQV) to determine a ranking that would provide a greater portion of the balance of the state trust fund after the initial calculation to poorer and more densely populated communities. However, only those that committed a three percent surcharge whether by adopting a three percent surcharge or the blended CPA (as stated above) are eligible for these additional distributions. The decile ranking used to determine the equity and surplus rounds can be found by clicking here. The distribution summary can be found in this report.

The state community preservation trust fund was created in 2000 and revenues from the registry of deeds started funneling into the trust fund right away. In FY2003, communities started collecting the local CPA surcharge. The first state match occurred in FY2004 based on those local surcharges. In FY2003, 34 communities adopted the CPA and were eligible for the state match. In FY2018, 162 communities were eligible to receive the state match. Until FY2009, the state trust fund was sufficient to provide communities with a 100 percent state match. Due to increasing participation and declining registry collections, DLS has not been able to provide a 100 percent state match since then.

In FY2018, ten additional communities will begin assessing the local CPA surcharge and will be eligible for the state match in FY2019. In the spring of 2018, DLS will project the first round state match for the 172 communities eligible for the state match in FY2019. The ten new communities are Billerica, Boston, Holyoke, Hull, Norwood, Pittsfield, Rockland, Springfield, Watertown and Wrentham. For a complete list of all communities that have adopted the CPA, please click here. As of today, only one other community has scheduled a ballot question to adopt the CPA. Voters in the town of Northbridge will decide next spring whether to add the CPA surcharge at one percent. For the up-to-date listing of communities considering adoption of the CPA, please refer to the Community Preservation Coalition website at www.communitypreservation.org or by clicking here.

Dog poop solution

I bet this could cut down on dog poop around town – Medfield State Hospital and behind Wheelock.

John Thompson, chair of the Medfield State Hospital Building and Grounds Committee got an $8,000 per year quote from a firm that will pick up the dog poop at both sites.

Colleen Sullivan posted a WCVB story (click here) about an apartment complex that allows dogs on the property as long as owners provide a DNA swab.  Then offending poops can be checked against the DNA database.