Monthly Archives: August 2013

Problem with elected judges in other states

The following needs to be more fully examined –

From the Brennan Center for Justice on Judicial Campaign Contributions and Recusal Rules

New Report Highlights Questionable Spending in 2004 Illinois Supreme Court Election
In a recent report for the Center for American Progress, authors Billy Corriher and Brent DeBeaumont highlight allegations that State Farm violated the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) in the 2004 Illinois Supreme Court election by secretly contributing to the campaign of Justice Lloyd A. Karmeier. Prior to the 2004 election, State Farm appealed a case to the Illinois Supreme Court in which they were ordered to pay over $1 billion for breaching a clause in their automobile insurance contract. The case, Avery v. State Farm, remained pending during the 2004 election cycle, during which State Farm and its employees contributed $350,000 to Justice Karmeier’s campaign. After winning the election, Justice Karmeier refused to recuse himself from the case, and in 2005, he joined the majority in overturning the ruling against State Farm.

In 2009, in light of the Caperton v. Massey ruling, the plaintiffs’ counsel in Avery “launched an investigation to determine whether State Farm’s financial involvement in Justice Karmeier’s 2004 campaign had been fully disclosed. The plaintiffs claim to have uncovered additional evidence that proves that Justice Karmeier’s conflict of interest was just as significant as the conflict of interest in Caperton. As with the donations from Massey Coal, State Farm had a ‘stake in a particular case’ that was ‘pending or imminent’ at the time that it ‘rais[ed] funds or direct[ed] the judge’s election campaign.'” Information uncovered by retired FBI Special Agent Daniel Reece led the plaintiffs to believe that “as much as $4 million given to Justice Karmeier’s campaign came from State Farm or entities strongly influenced by State Farm executives.” The authors note, “This newly unearthed evidence suggests that State Farm deliberately concealed the extent of its financial support for Justice Karmeier’s 2004 campaign by funneling money through a trade association, a political action committee, and a political party–all with the goal of reversing the $1 billion verdict against the company.”


Source: Billy Corriher and Brent DeBeaumont, Dodging a Billion-Dollar Verdict, Center for American Progress, August 2013.

Safer bike helmets

Bicycling magazine recently ran an article discussing new cycling helmets and standards that provide better protection against concussions and TBI.  Here is a link to an on-line version:  http://www.bicycling.com/senseless/

Lead poisoning & marijuana – similar drops in IQ

Chris Thurstone, M.D. is a Colorado child psychiatrist who studies adolescent addiction and writes about the problems he witnesses of our youth using marijuana.  In a recent article, he notes the similar 8 point decline in children’s IQ that has been documented for both lead exposure and marijuana use by youth, and our society’s quite different response to the two causes

See Dr. Thurstone’scomments

About Dr. Thurstone (from his website) –

Dr. Christian Thurstone is one of fewer than three dozen physicians in the United States who are board certified in general, child and adolescent and addictions psychiatry. He is medical director of one of Colorado’s largest youth substance-abuse-treatment clinics and an associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Colorado Denver, where he conducts research on youth substance use and addiction. Dr. Thurstone has completed medical training at the University of Chicago, Northwestern University and UCD. In 2010, he completed five years of mentored research training through the National Institute on Drug Abuse/American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry K12 Research Program in Substance Abuse.

BoS minutes for 7/16 & 8/6

Meeting Minutes
—-July-16,-2013,—Chenery
Meeting room
…… ··draft
PRESENT: selectmen fisher, Peterson, DeSorgher; Assistant Town Administrator Trierweiler;
Town Counsel Cerel; Administrative Assistant Clarke. Town Administrator Sullivan absent
Chairman Fisher called the meeting to order at 7:00 PM and announced that this meeting is
being recorded. He began the meeting asking for a moment of appreciation for our brave
servicemen and women serving in Afghanistan.
VINE LAKE CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS
Attending, Robb Gregg, AI Manganello, David Temple
Commissioner Gregg said that the committee appreciates the invitation from the Board to be
present this evening as there are several items he would like to bring to their attention. The
commissioners would like to see that a charter is established outlining items such as the
purpose of their group, including scope of duty, preservation rules and etiquette, how to plan
for future growth and patterns. He said that they have no input and are unaware of what goes
into preparing the cemetery budget and as far as record keeping as to who and number are in
each plot it’s sketchy at best. When a burial takes place for someone out of town, no record
can be found in Town Hall. Gregg said that the commission is looking for some direction from
the Selectmen. Mr. Peterson apologized as to the fact that there has been no guidance from
the Board and totally agrees that we have to plan for future growth. Mr. DeSorgher is also
concerned that a plan for expansion must be in place before the cemetery is full. Undertakers
handle in part the burials calling the DPW to make arrangements. The pricing of plots comes
under the Town setting pricing. Mr. Fisher commented that the cemetery is well maintained.
The Selectmen agree that DPW does an excellent job and also commend Frank lafolla and Ron
Griffin who take care of placing flags at the veterans’ graves for Memorial Day. The Board
thanked the commissioners for their input.
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE
The Board is anxious for this committee to move forward and have invited the committee this
evening to give them some idea of what we hope they will accomplish. Important to develop
the resources to help support businesses already in town and also seek out new opportunities
to locate to Medfield. Mr. Peterson pOinted out that housing is primary. Mr. Sullivan was
advised to prepare a mission statement for the Selectmen’s review at the next meeting.
Members on the committee have expressed their desire to continue are Pat Casey, Joe Scier,
Ann Thompson, Paul Hinkley and Charlie Peck and James Wakely. On a motion made and
seconded it was voted unanimously to reappoint the Economic Development Committee.
New members added are Ralph Costello, Jim James, Tom Nightingale and Marion Lent.
Member Pat Casey was tasked to act as chairman and call the first meeting. He said that is best
to wait until summer’s end as people may have vacation plans.

July 16, 2013
—–Jlage-twe—-
OPEB FUNDING LIABILITY
Gus Murby Warrant Committee Chairman remarked that this item is his committee’s number
one issue on their agenda. Presently we have 680,000.00 and in 2011 the town had 39.8 million
in liability and we need 3.5 million a year. He said that he attended a few meetings on the
subject and Medfield is at the front of the line trying to keep on top (as compared to other
towns).
The Governor is working on reform changing who is eligible. A required stipulation is that
insurance benefits will only be offered to employees who have 20 or more years of working
service to be eligible for health insurance. This item is objectionable and in Medfield we have
several employees who missed this requirement.
MEETING MINUTES
VOTED unanimously to approve the July 2, 2013 meeting minutes with revisions
COMMON VICTUALLER LICENSE
VOTED unanimously to grant a common victualler license to a new business, Starbucks
Coffee located at 461 Main Street (former Mobil Gas Station)
CAR WASH
VOTED unanimously to grant permission to the High School Student Council to hold a c
Fundraising car wash behind Town Hall on Saturday August 24, 2013, 8AM to 2PM
COMMITTEE APPOINTMENT
VOTE: Selectman Peterson made a motion, seconded by Selectman DeSorgher to
appoint Gwen Centore and Roslyn Talerman to the Council on Aging Board and as
recommended by Council on Aging. Vote was unanimous
DPW SALT SHED CONTRACT
The Town has not as of yet received the document. Place on next meeting’s agenda.
POLICE CONTRACT
Ms. Trierweiler remarked that Town Meeting ratified the three-year contract, which calls for a
2.5% increase for each year. The Selectmen are requested to vote to sign the contract.
VOTE: Selectman Peterson made a motion, seconded by Selectmen DeSorgher to approve
and sign The Agreement between the Town of Medfield and the Medfield Police League for
July 16, 2013
—P-age-thFee—
the term July 1, 2013 to June 30, 3016. Vote was unanimous
NEW TOWN GARAGE
The Board is requested to award the contracts for several projects pertaining to the new
garage.
VOTED: Selectman Peterson made a motion, seconded by Selectman DeSorgher to award
the contract for Fuel Tank Storage Replacement to MECO Environmental Services, Inc. in
the amount of $90,880.00; award contract for Pavement Pulverization to Murray Paving
and Reclamation at $.95 a square yard and to Aggregate Industries Northeast Region
Installation of Binder Asphalt at $69.29 a ton
DISCUSSION
Annual committee appointments. Ms Clarke who just returned from vacation will contact
committee chairmen to find out if members are seeking reappointment. Hold for future
meeting.
SELECTMEN’S GOALS
Mr. DeSorgher has additional ideas to be included on the list of goals; improving
communications; direction to the state hospital committee; long-range planning; continue to
provide high quality education to our citizens. As town Administrator is not here this evening,
the Selectmen agreed to hold the discussion regarding Selectmen’s goals for the next meeting.
PENDING
Ms. Trierweiler reported that the Permanent Building Committee, Police Chief and Fire Chief
will attend a Selectmen’s meeting in September.
Post Office fence – As Sullivan has had no firm commitment as to when the fence will be
repaired, Mr. DeSorgher strongly suggests that Congressman Kennedy be contacted. The
situation has been going on too long and it is a safety issue.
SELECTMEN REPORT
Mr. Peterson remarked that the Cultural Counsel has had very interesting discussions on
several topics to enhance the downtown; attended the MCAP meeting. It is a great group of
people who truly care. The committee is waiting to hear if we received the grant giving the
Town $125,000 for five years to carryon the work of this group.
Selectman Peterson held office hour at the CENTER and had a discussion with Beth Weaver; her
son bought the Clark Tavern and I told her anything the Town can do to help with the project to
please let us know. Another resident inquired about returnable bottles at the Transfer Station.
I let him know that we have single stream recycling and this has cancelled bottle deposits.
I
July 16, 2013
_____ f’age_four’—-_____ _
Mr. DeSorgher reported that the Downtown Study Committee did a site walk at Meetinghouse
Pond to see if a plan could be developed to revitalize the area. He would like to form a
committee to oversee the project. Committee to include Downtown study Committee, Cultural
District, Garden Club, Historical the First Parish church and Montrose School. A Selectman
should be appointed and Ken Feeney as ex officious. Desorgher attended the weekly meeting
at the garage site. Nstar needs to remove a utility pole at the site in order for the project to
move forward, however, Nstar’s lack of response is frustrating. He went on to report that on
my daily work around Town I noticed a couple of areas that need attention. At 16 Hickory Drive
the sidewalk is dug up and needs to be repaired; Elm Street, at pole number three there is
excessive wire on the ground which is very unsafe. Fence at Hinkley Park needs repair and I
talked with Jim Snyder who will get it fixed.
Mr. DeSorgher made note that there are a few items to carryover to the next meeting; Town
Charter and By Law Review Committee, Insurance Advisory Committee and a date for state reps
to attend a meeting.
Mr. Fisher remarked that he enjoyed the Sousa Band performance on July 3. It was a terrific
concert. He encouraged the listening audience to come to the downtown on Thursday
evenings. The concerts at the Gazebo are great and visit the Zullo Gallery to relax and enjoy
the music.
INFORMATIONAL
Ms. Trierweiler highlighted the article regarding MA plan to ban commercial food waste.
If you have at least 1 ton of organic waste you will need to donate or repurpose the food
waste beginning July 1, 2014. This applies to restaurants, hospitals, universities, etc. The
waste will be shipped to a facility that will turn it into clean energy.
Notes of July 9th DPW garage meeting
Copy of 2012 Annual Report ofthe Foundation for Metrowest
A public hearing is scheduled with the Selectmen on August 6 regarding the Nstar pole at
Starbucks. She said we will have a site visit at 9:30 tomorrow to discuss the location of
the pole.
MBTA Advisory Board Appointment. Michael has been the appointee. Request to reappoint
VOTE: On a motion made and seconded it was Voted unanimously to reappoint Michael
Sullivan to the MBTA Advisory Board
Department of Public Safety, Architectural Access Board granted a sidewalk variance for
Randi’s Automotive located at 26 Spring Street
MEDFIELD STATE HOSPITAL
State Hospital Redevelopment Committee Chairman Steve Nolan reported to the Selectmen
that DCAM said that the numbers will be available in another week as they need the time for
i +– !
July 16, 2013
I’age-five———— –
internal review. We had hoped to see them by today.
Nolan said that they met this evening with the Water and Sewer Board to discuss the water
tower and tubular wellfields to determine what their needs are. We are hoping to get a
transfer of land on which the Town could construct a new water tower as the current tower is
beyond repair. There is also the issue of the existing tubular wellfields which are needed for a
backup water supply for the Town. At this point it appears we will need a town meeting vote to
file legislation regarding these issues and discuss the idea of easements vs a fee simple title.
There is still a lot of discussions that have to take place. The Selectmen agree and thanked the
committee for all their work.
ADJOURNMENT
Selectman Peterson made a motion to adjourn the meeting at 8:30 PM seconded by Selectman
Desorgher. The vote was unanimous.
Meeting Minutes
–August-6,26B:—Chenery
Meeting room
–draft _.
PRESENT: Selectmen Fisher, Peterson, DeSorgher; Town Administrator Sullivan; Assistant town
Administrator Trierweiler; Administrative assistant Clarke
Chairman Fisher called the meeting to order at 7:00PM and announced the meeting is being
recorded. He began the meeting asking for a moment of appreciation for our brave servicemen
and women serving in Afghanistan.
PUBLIC HEARING -Nstar Grant of Location to install one pole on North Street
Christine Cosby, Nstar Rep said that the work is necessary to provide electrical service to the
new Starbucks as they require more electricity than the previous business. She remarked that
we had a site visit with Town officials and determined the best location for the pole.
VOTE: Selectman Peterson made a motion, seconded by Selectman DeSorgher to approve
the grant of Location for one (1) utility pole located on North Street. Vote unanimous
Selectman DeSorgher said that he has a few items to bring to the attention of Nstar. Nstar is
holding up a $10 million dollar construction project, a new town Garage. The pole must be
removed and Nstar refuses to do the work; numerous calls have been placed and we have had
no response. This situation in itself is costing the Town extra money and we deserve a rebate.
Another issue is a pole on Eastmount Road that was put through a drain pipe causing flooding
in the street. Again it has been that way for a long time with no response from Nstar.
Right here on Janes Avenue is the Robert McCarthy Blacksmith Historical Monument that was
dedicated in 2011. Selectman Peterson personally called Nstar requesting that the double pole
right near the site be removed and no response.
Mr. DeSorgher thought that Ms. Cosby was the Town’s new Nstar Representative. He
apologized to her saying that I know it’s not your fault but I have to let Nstar know about my
frustrations with the company. He then continued with the double pole issue saying that he
has counted about 200 poles along the streets and wants an answer to Nstar’s justification
about breaking the law. The law states that double poles should be removed within 90 days.
His list does go on and he again said how very frustrating that we cannot get Nstar to take care
of these situations. Ms. Cosby said that she is not the person to help get some resolution to
these issues, however, she will forward the information through the proper channel.
DOWNTOWN STUDY COMMITTEE
Chairman Brandie Erb highlighted some of the projects that have come before her committee
throughout the year. She remarked that Medfield’s application to be designated a Tree City
met most ofthe qualifications including an Arbor Day Ceremony. We will find out in 2014 ifthe
designation comes through. The Committee was happy to work with the developer of the
former Mobil Station and is pleased with the results ofthe new Starbucks facility. After Lord’s
August 6, 2013
-1——– -Page-two’——-
closed we came up with an idea to help cover the “black hole” on Main Street; talked with the
director of the after school program and a plan was made to cover some of the windows with
the children’s art work. A wonderful job was accomplished and it looks great. We are very
cognizant of the fact that the downtown should be updated and we are working toward those
goals. There has been discussion with the utility companies to put the wires underground
particularly from South Street to Park Street, however, this is a very expensive project and very
disruptive. She went on to say that they have reviewed the Baker’s Pond area and to start we
hope to enhance the site by putting in some new plantings. We do feel that we want to make
Medfield a vibrant and welcoming community.
Mr. Peterson talked about adding signage to make the public aware ofthe Park Street
businesses and hopes some resolution will be met.
Mr. DeSorgher said that the new Meetinghouse Pond committee should have a Downtown
Study Committee liaison so we will work on that. He continued that there have been
improvements already that are very pleasing. The Selectmen thanked Ms. Erb for the
Committee’s efforts in making the downtown a welcoming site to Medfield.
CULTURAL DISTRICT
Jean Mineo told the Board that she would like to give them information about the Paint Box
Project. It entails the utility boxes on public sidewalks. We want to start with the box outside
Bank of America and we also included the box in front of CVS because of its prominent location.
The program commissions an artist to create an original work of art on the box which will
enhance the area and reduce graffiti. The paint box project is modeled after the Boston
program where 80 boxes have been painted since 2008. We estimate a budget of $500.00 for
each box. The Council is committed to raising funds for the two boxes and if individuals or a
business can help with additional funding the program can be expanded. She commented that
the review committee is herself, Bill Pope and Kristine Trierweiler.
Mr. Peterson made a motion, seconded by Selectman DeSorgher to authorize and implement
the project as described.
FUNDRAISING CONCERT AT THE GAZEBO
Selectman DeSorgher was contacted by resident Paul Deluca requesting permission to use the
Town Gazebo for a benefit concert, proposed date second or third week in September. The
cost of a ticket is $15.00 and a food donation for the Medfield Food Cupboard. Mr. Deluca
thought it a good idea to hold the concert on the evening of Medfield Day. The Selectmen
suggested that he talk with MEMO before setting the date and also to Police Chief Meaney.
Mr. DeSorgher said that he knows of the work Mr. Deluca does for local charitable purposes.
The Selectmen look forward to learning the finalized details.
HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION
Michael Taylor Chairman said that the commission looks at historical resources that we feel
should be protected. Right now we are concerned with the 23 buildings at the hospital site.
August 6, 2013
– –f’age-th~ee,———
Tomorrow night at 6 PM there will be a walking tour of the buildings to make an assessment.
Anyone interested should meet at the Chapel. A study was done about 10 years ago and at that
time it was determined that two or three had to be torn down. Our tour tomorrow night will
give us much needed information about the
condition of the buildings right now. After the tour we will meet in Town Hall for our regular
meeting and discuss the property.
Mr. Taylor remarked that the commission is working with the new owners of the Clark Tavern
on Main Street and is also focusing on the downtown from the Monk’s Block to Green Street.
SIGN COMMITTEE
Matt McCormack remarked that the committee is an advisory board keeping the aesthetics of
the downtown in particular pleasing. He mentioned that the committee is aware of the fact
that the Park Street businesses need signage to be placed at Main Street and hopes that the
Selectmen will include them in a decision regarding signage around town. He highlighted the
decision regarding the Kingsbury Club sign. Also mentioned that as they work with the sign
bylaw, in particular getting new businesses to follow the requirements, the committee agrees
that the sign bylaw needs updating.
MEDFIELD CULTURAL COUNCIL
Library Director Deborah Kelsey said that the Council appreciates the state’s technical
assistance to re-identify a smaller proposed cultural district. The plan she described is more
focused and includes specific goals and management ofthe district, street scape, public art and
we do have a financial advisor. We are working on a pamphlet of photographs and haikus
highlighting the Town. She went on to say that along with Jean Mineo and Sarah Raposa we
have had a work driven summer to revise our application that will hopefully allow the area to
be classified as a cultural district by the state.
NEW TOWN GARAGE
The Selectmen are requested to vote to sign the vendor warrant and several contractors’
agreements pertaining to the new DPW Garage:
VOTE: Selectman Peterson made a motion, seconded by Selectman DeSorgher to sign
the vendor warrant payable to the Town’s Inspection Department for building permits in
the amount of $68,190.00; Agreement with Aggregate Industries, Northeast Region for
Placement of Bituminous Concrete Pavement at $69.29 per ton; Agreement with MECO
Environmental Services, Inc. for Fuel Tank Modifications in the amount of $90,880.00;
Agreement with Murray Paving, Inc. for Pavement Pulverization at $.9S square yard;
Williams Stone Co., Inc. for Granite Curb at $25,994.55. Vote was unanimous.
Mr. Sullivan said that he wanted the Board to know that the contractor will begin construction
next week.
i August 6, 2013
r——page-fOUr—–
. MINUTES
VOTED unanimously to approve the meeting minutes for May 21, June 4 and 18, 2013
with revisions
TOWN’S AUDITOR
The Town has engaged Powers & Sullivan, LLC, Certified Public Accountants to provide an audit
of our financial statements for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2013. The Selectmen are
requested to vote to sign the engagement letter.
VOTE: Selectman Peterson made a motion, seconded by Selectman DeSorgher to execute
the engagement letter with the Town’s Auditors Powers & Sullivan, LLC. Vote was
unanimous
LICENSES & PERMITS
VOTED unanimously to grant permission to the Medfield Youth basketball association
to post signs announcing registration for the 2013-2014 season.
VOTED unanimously to grant the Zullo Gallery a one-day wine & malt beverage permit
For event to be held Friday August 9, 2013 SPM to 11:30 PM
PENDING
The Economic Development Committee charge. Mr. Sullivan presented the Selectmen with a
draft copy. They will review and discuss at the next meeting.
Mr. Sullivan reported that the Post Office fence will be repaired beginning later this week.
Selectmen’s goals. DeSorgher reviewed and wants to add “improve communication with Town
Boards to support a positive atmosphere”
Tentative dates of September 17 or October 1 for state reps to visit
Annual appointments; hold for next meeting
Announcement to the listening audience; the Board of Health has vacancies. Interested
residents send resumes to the Town Hall
MEDFIELD STATE HOSPITAL STATUS UPDATE
A letter was received from MASS Historic Commission wherein they write that they do not
August 6, 2013
—–IPage-five
support the demolition of the Odyssey House. It was requested of the Police Chief, Fire Chief
and Building Commissioner to let the Selectmen know their thoughts about the condition ofthe
house. Each one supports the demolition as the building, in their opinions is a public safety
hazard. Letters have been written to be delivered to MASS Historic Commission.
The Selectmen are requested to vote to request MASS Historic reconsider their denial of
demolition and sign a letter stating their position and it was so voted.
Ms. Trierweiler remarked that a fall special town meeting will have to be called regarding the
home rule petition for water issues. She said that she will discuss with the Town Clerk and have
a meeting date schedule for the next Selectmen’s meeting.
SELECTMEN REPORT
Mr. Peterson held first Friday of the month office hour at the CENTER and had interesting
conversations with several people. He would like to see consideration of placing solar PV at
the state hospital site. Mr. Peterson commented that Stone Consulting is conducting an
investigation regarding OPEB. He feels that this is a former Selectmen Committee item.
Mr. DeSorgher is concerned with the condition of the North Street road. Mr. Sullivan said that
it left that way as a temporary repair until it settles. He advised that Medfield should reach out
to neighboring towns, Sherborn, Dover, Millis, to attend a meeting to let them know the up-todate
plans for the hospital property. His thought is that the meeting could be held at the
Dwight-Derby House in September. Selectman DeSorgher received a call from a resident who
would like to see Town Hall be more visitor friendly and resident’s suggestion is to spruce up
the front and back entrances by refinishing the front door. Mr. Sullivan said that we have plans
to do that work very soon. Also, suggests that we should have a one question survey handed
out to Town Hall employees regarding suggestions as to what can be done to make visits to
town hall a more positive experience.
Mr. DeSorgher feels that the trenches on Route 109 near Donut Express and the Groceria are
dangerous. Have DPW take a look. An observation from his daily walk, request homeowners
trim bushes to make the sidewalk easier to pass. On the sidewalk subject he feels that in some
neighborhoods two sidewalks, one on each side of the street should be implemented. Sullivan
remarked that it is more economical to maintain just one. Mr. DeSorgher emphasized the fact
that the utility company cuts back trees and foliage near high tension wires. Sullivan said that it
is a periodic program and they have the right to do. He brought up the subject of the SWAP
area at the Transfer Station that he hears from residents they will not use it. Sullivan
commented that the Solid Waste Study Committee has taken it under advisement.
Selectman DeSorgher congratulated the Pan Mass riders. There were about 50 Medfield
residents who participated. Police did a good job handling the traffic. At Hinkley Pond he
understands they have had a successful season this year. He attended the weekly meeting
regarding the new garage and gives kudos to the DPW for the great work they are doing.
August 6, 2013
—Page-six———
Selectman DeSorgher reported to his peers that he put together a schedule for the
Neighborhood Mini Town meetings to begin in September. This first one is in the Pondview
Road area and I will take it. Suggest we have a rotating schedule.
Selectman Fisher had a good interview with Jack Peterson. Reminded the audience to come
enjoy the Thursday night MEMO summer concerts at the Gazebo and visit the Zullo Gallery and
enjoy the view from their deck.
INFORMATIONAL
Town Accountant Joy Ricciuto prepared the cherry sheet comparison analysis
Copy of the notice for Castagna Construction Corp. to proceed the construction of the
New DPW Garage
Printout of article from the Municipal Advocate regarding pavement management
Norfolk County Commissioners’ FY 12 Annual Report
ADJOURNMENT
Motion made and seconded at 9:35 to adjourn the meeting. Vote was unanimous.

BoS 8/20 agenda

Board of Selectmen
Town Hall, Chenery Meeting Room, 2nd floor Tuesday August 20, 2013 @ 7:00 PM

AGENDA (SUBJECT TO CHANGE)

ACTION

Discuss letter received from Town of Walpole regarding Department of Development Services’ RFP for construction of group home in a Walpole neighborhood Notice from Metropolitan Area Planning Council regarding annual Municipal Elections to the Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization. Nomination papers due September 27,2013

Discuss the RFQ for the State Hospital Redevelopment Committee’s Visioning Forum

LICENSES & PERMITS

Request for a Neighborhood Block Party in the Morse Drive area, Saturday September 28,2013

PENDING
Annual committee appointments
Mission statement for the Economic Development Committee
Selectmen’s goals

=================================
BOARD OF SELECTMEN
Mark Gallivan, Chainnan
Michael C. Berry, Vice Chainnan
Nancy Mackenzie, Clerk
Christopher G. Timson
CliffoiiSiiliffer,’ JT.”
August 2, 2013
Medfield Board of Selectmen
459 Main St
Medfield, MA 02052
RE: RFP, Project 201282000
30 Year Lease, Group Home
Dear Board of Selectmen:
TOWN HALL
135 School Street
Walpole, MA 02081
(508) 660-7277
(508}6§0~ 7276″
Fax (508) 660-7303
The Town of Walpole recently received a building permit application from CIL Realty of
Massachusetts, Incorporated, to construct a group home containing five bedrooms. This
home is situated in a rural residential neighborhood and must be at minimum 2,735 s.f.
CIL Realty had responded to an RFP from DCAMM on behalfofthe Department of
Developmental Services a copy of this RFP is enclosed. The Board of Selectmen wanted
to make you aware that your community was included in the listing of the site locations.
This Board was not made aware of this proposal prior to the building permit application.
We have reached out to the Department of Developmental Services to better educate
ourselves in the process this State Agency uses when choosing the communities in their
RFP’s. This Board would have appreciated being made aware of the State encouraging
growth in our community as this proposal can have an impact on our inspectional service
departments as well as public safety.
There have been many questions by the neighbors on this street and if we had been made
aware of this proposal prior to the building permit application, this Board could have held
a forum to answer questions and or concerns raised by our residents.
We would like to know if your community was made aware of this RFP or have had a
similar situation. We would greatly appreciate hearing from you regarding this issue.
Sincerely
WALPOLE BOARD OF SELECTMEN
Mark Gallivan, Chairman
RECEIVED
AUG 082013
MEOFIELD SELECTME[\I
BOARD OF SELECTMEN
Mark Gallivan, Chairman
Michael C. Berry, Vice Chairman
Nancy Mackenzie, Clerk
Christopher G. Timson
TOWN HALL
135 School Street
Walpole, MA 02081
(508) 660-7277
(508) 660-7276
________ CliftoILSnuffer,_Jr. __ _ _ Fax(508} 660,’)303 _
August 2,2013
Commissioner Elin M. Howe
Department of Developmental Services
500 Harrison Ave
Boston, MA 02118
Dear Commissioner Howe:
The Town of Walpole has received an application to construct a group home on
Nightingale Farm Road in our town. The applicant, ClL Realty of Massachusetts,
Incorporated provided our Building Commissioner with a copy of the Request for
Proposals for Project #201282000. This RFP outlines particular towns including
Walpole as the possible site location for this project.
The Board of Selectmen is inquiring as to what procedure was used that included
Walpole in the listing of communities for this project. The Board would like to better
educate themselves on the process DDS uses in choosing the communities in their
Request for proposals for a group home.
Further, the Board questions the encouragement of unexpected growth in our town which
may require future services to the residents. Does DDS reimburse the community for
additional costs associated with inspections performed during the construction of this
home?
Your assistance in this most important matter is greatly appreciated.
WALPOLE BOARD OF SELECTMEN
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OEVAL L PATRICK
GOVERNOR
TIMOTHY P. MURRAY
LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR
Mr. David 0. McKinley
Vice President, Development
(!!n.e ~klll/m. il/afXI
$0410-1’1, JluJ(w,c/uPle/A. 02108
;%1: (017) 727-101;()
,rfl~: (6’-17) 717-:,36’8
June 11, 2013
ClL Realty of Massachusetts Incorporated
157 Charter Oak Avenue, 3′” Floor
Hartford, Connecticut 06106
GtENSHOR
SECRETARY, ADMINISTRATION
8. FINANce
CAROLE CORNELISON
GOMMJSSIONER
RE: Request for Proposals (the RFP) on behalf of the Department of Developmental Services (DDS),
Belmont, Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, Canton, Chelsea, Dedham, Dover, Foxboro,
Framingham, Holliston, Medfield, Millis, Natick, Needham, Newton, Norfolk, Northborough,
Norwood, Plainville, Sharon, Sherborn, Sudbury, Walpole, Waltham, Watertown, Wayland,
Wellesley, Westborough, Weston, Westwood, or Wrentham, Project #201282000.
Dear Mr. McKinley:
The Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance (DCAMM) has completed the
evaluation of proposal received for the RFP. DCAMM is pleased to advise ClL Realty of Massachusetts,
Incorporated, (the Proposer) that DCAMM has determined that the proposal for a 30-Year LeasePurchase
Agreement for a group home of 2,735 square feet at a site “To Be Determined” (the Proposal),
best satisfies the criteria set forth in the RFP.
Please see the Commonwealth 30-year Lease Purchase Agreement that accompanied the RFP (the
Lease) for the definitions of initially capitalized terms-of-art in this letter that are not otherwise defmed in
this letter.
Without limiting or modifying the conditions set forth in the RFP or the Commonwealth 30-year Lease
Purchase Agreement (the Lease), selection of these Proposals is subject to the following conditions:
L The Proposer must identify in writing a group home site (the Site), in accordance with the defined
search area within the RFP by September 13, 2013, The Proposer must demonstrate, to the
satisfaction of DCAMM and the User Agency that the Site meet all requirements and satisfies all
criteria of the RFP,
To confirm agreement with and acceptance of these conditions as written, a counterpart of this
letter must be executed and dated (as provided below) by a person authorized to bind the Proposer and
returned not later than 2:00 PM on June 17,2013 to Peter M. Woodford, Senior Project Manager, at the
June 11,2013
Mr. David O. McKinley
ClL Realty of Massachusetts Incorporated
RE: Request For Proposals (the RFP), Project # 201282000
–Page 2 —-
letterhead address. (Failure of the Proposer to timely comply with this paragraph may result, in the sole
discretion of DCAMM, in the termination of this conditional selection.)
Upon timely compliance by the Proposer with the immediately preceding paragraph;
representatives of DCAMM and DDS will contact the Proposer to finalize the provisions of a lease that
must be in the form of the Commonwealth 30-Year Lease-Purchase Agreement that accompanied the
RFP. (All capitalized terms of art in this notification are defined in the Commonwealth 30-Year LeasePurchase
Agreement 9r- in this notification.) Any changes to or deviations from the RFP specifications,
the Proposal, or the Commonwealth 30-Year Lease-Purchase Agreement are subject to approval by
DCAM. Lease is not final until it has been approved and executed by DCAMM. Any expenses incurred
by the Proposer before execution of a Lease are incurred at the Proposer’s sole risk.
Please note that the only purpose of this notification is to advise the Proposer of the current status
of the selection process. This notice does not constitute a commitment by the Commonwealth to enter
into a lease or an acceptance by the Commonwealth of the proposed Total Annual Rent or of any other
provision of the Proposal. While it is assumed that the parties will make a good-faith effort to negotiate a
lease, the Commonwealth reserves the right to terminate this conditional selection and negotiation due to
unforeseen changes in the requirements of DDS, the failure to fmalize a lease in a timely fashion, or if, for
any other reason, termination is deemed to be in the best interest of the Commonwealth in the sole
discretion of DCAMM. If negotiations are terminated, the Commonwealth may re-advertise or enter into
negotiations with another proposer.
If there are any questions, please call the Senior Project Manager, Peter M. Woodford, at 617-
727-8000, extension 347.
ClL Realty of Massachusetts Incorporated
By:
Name
Title
cc: Paul Antonellis, DDS
Tracking File # 201282000
Sincerely,
WA,~~~
Martha Goldsmith, Director
Office of Leasing and State Office Planning
Date Signed
,
• ,
METROPOLITAN “‘PEA PLANNING COUNCIL
August 5, 2013
TO: Chief Elected Officials
MBTAAdvis()rY·Boaid···
177 Tremont Street, Boston, MA 02111
Tel: (617) 426-6054 Fax: (617) 451-2054
AUG 0 i’Z013
MEDFiElD SELECTMEN
FR: Paul Regan, Executive Director, MBTA Advisory Board
Marc Draisen, Executive Director, Metropolitan Area Planning Conncil
RE: Municipal Elections to the Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization
IMPORTANT DATES:
• Nomination Papers Due – Friday, September 27, 2013, at 5:00 PM, to MAPC;
• Election – MAPC Fall Council Meeting end of October; date, location and time
to be decided.
We are pleased to forward a copy of the election procedures for the elected mnnicipal seats on
the Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO). The MPO is responsible for
planning and programming fmancial resources for a multi-modal transportation system for the
10 I mnnicipalities in the Boston region. (An overview of MPO member responsibilities is
included as Attachment C of the Official Notice of Elections.)
The MPO seat currently held by the City of Somerville representing the Inner Core Committee
sub-region and the MPO seat currently held by the Town of Frarningham representing the
MetroWest Regional Collaborative sub-region are up for election this year. Any mnnicipality
from the Inner Core or Metro West sub-regions may seek nominations to run for their respective
open sub-regional seat.
The MPO has 22 voting members, which currently include:
State members
Massachusetts Departroent of Transportation (MassDOT) with three seats appointed by the
Secretary of Transportation, at least one of which is from its Highway Division;
Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA);
Massachusetts Port Authority (Massport)
Regional members
Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC);
META Advisory Board;
Regional Transportation Advisory Conncil (RTAC)
Municipal members
City of Boston with two seats
Twelve (12) elected municipalities, one seat each from the eight MAPC sub-regions.
Inner Core Committee: Somerville
Three Rivers Inter~local Council: Norwood
South West Area Planning Committee: Medway
Metro West Regional Collaborative: Framingham
North Suburban Planning Council: Woburn
North Shore Task Force: Beverly
Minuteman Advisory Group on Inter-local Coordination: Bedford
South Shore Coalition: Braintree
Two (2) cities filling at-large seats: Newton and Everett
Two (2) towns filling at-large seats: Arlington and Lexington
All elected municipal seats (including the sub-regional seats) are elected by all of the 101
municipalities in the Boston Region MPO area. Each of the 101 municipalities may vote for one
(I) municipality for each of the two (2) open sub-regional seats.
The election will be held at MAPC’s Fall Council Meeting end of October; date, location and
time to be decided. At that time, municipalities to hold the two sub-regional seats will be elected
to the MPO. The usual process of mailing ballots and accepting absentee ballots will apply, as
described in the procedures.
In order to qualifY to be on the ballot, each chief elected official who wishes to be a candidate
must secure the signatures of five chief elected officials in the region, including their own. Chief
elected officials may only sign nomination papers for one municipality per sub-region for
the two open sub-regional seats. Nominations are due to MAPC by 5:00 PM on Friday,
September 27, 2013, and must be filed in person or by mail at the MAPC, 60 Temple Place,
6th Floor, Boston, MA 02111. Faxes or emails will not be accepted.
A copy of the official notice and procedures for nomination and election to the MPO are
attached. We appreciate your interest in this important matter and look forward to your
participation. If you have questions, please call Eric Bourassa (617) 933-0740 or Paul Regan at
(617) 426-6054.
Attachments
cc:
Official Notice, including Attachments A – C
Nomination Papers
Statement of Candidacy
MBTA Advisory Board
Sub-regional Chairs
Official Notice
2013 Boston Region MPO Municipal Election Procedures
At the MAPC Fall Council Meeting, end of October 2013 (date, time, location TBD), elections will be
held for two (2) of the twelve (12) elected municipal seats on the Boston Region Metropolitan Plauning
Organization (MPO). At that time two (2) municipalities (each representing an MAPC Subregion) will
be elected to the MPO by the chief elected officials of the 101 municipalities which constitute the
Boston metropolitan region. Pursuant to the MPO Memorandum of Understanding, approved on July 7,
2011, MAPC and the MBT A Advisory Board (Advisory Board) administer the election of the municipal
representatives to the MPO. .
MPO Seats Up For Election
One (1) municipality from the Inner Core Committee.
One (1) municipality from the MetroWest Regional Collaborative.
Terms of election on the MPO are for three years.
Nomination Process
Nominees for the elected municipal seats shall be the chief elected official of the municipality. In cities
this is the Mayor or, if the city does not have the office of Mayor, then the Chairman of the Council,
with the exception of Plan E cities (Cambridge) in which case it shall be the City Manager. In towns,
the chief elected official is the Chairman of the Board of Selectmen. The MPO will accept the
Chairman’s nomination of a candidate whether or not the full Board of Selectman has voted it.
A nominee for an open municipal seat must receive five nominations made by any chief elected official
from the Boston region, regardless of which sub-region they are from. A chief elected official may
nominate his or her municipality and that nomination shall count as one of the five nominations needed
to place a municipality on the ballot. Each chief elected official may only sign nomination papers for
one municipality per sub-region for the two open seats.
Nominations papers are due on Friday, September 27,2013 to MAPC by 5:00 PM and must be
filed in person or by mail at MAPC, 60 Temple Place, 6th Floor, Boston, MA 02111, Attn: MPO
Elections. Faxes or emails will not be accepted. Nomination papers shall include a statement of
candidacy (250 word limit) of the community, also due on September 27.
Voting Process
Each of the 101 municipalities may vote for one (1) municipality from each of the two (2) open subregional
seats.
Ballot
A ballot will be prepared by MAPC and the Advisory Board based on the certification of nomination
papers. The ballot shall contain a list of the nominated municipalities. Candidate communities shall
appear on the ballot in an order drawn by lot by designated officers ofMAPC and the Advisory Board.
The subregion of each of the communities shall be identified on the ballot. A candidates’ booklet shall
be issued that shall contain the statement of candidacy of the communities. The list of communities
shall appear in the booklet in the same order that they appear on the ballot. In a second mailing, MAPC
and the Advisory Board will include an absentee ballot and instructions for how municipalities can cast
their vote.
1
1——
i SUBREGION
I North Shore Task Force
i
North Suburban Planning
Council
Minuteman Advisory Group
Interlocal Coordination
(MAGIC)
Metro West Regional
Collaborative
South West Advisory
Planning Committee (SWAP)
Three Rivers (TRIC)
South Shore Coalition
Inner Core
Attachment A
MAPC Sub-regions
COMMUNITIES
Beverly, Danvers, Essex, Gloucester, Hamilton, Ipswich,
Manchester-by-the-Sea, Marblehead, Middleton, Nahant,
Peabody, Rockport, Salem, Swampscott, Topsfield,
Wenham
Burlington, Lynnfield, North Reading, Reading,
Stoneham, Wakefield, Wilmington, Winchester,
Woburn
Acton, Bedford, Bolton, Boxborough, Carlisle,
Concord, Hudson, Lexington, Littleton, Lincoln,
Maynard, Stow, Sudbury
Ashland, Framingham, Holliston, Marlborough, Natick,
Southborough, Wayland, Wellesley, Weston
Bellingham, Dover, Franklin, Hopkinton, Medway,
Milford, Millis, Norfolk, Sherborn, Wrentham
Canton, Dedham, Dover, Foxborough, Medfield, Milton,
Needham, Norwood, Randolph, Sharon, Stoughton,
Walpole, Westwood
Braintree, Cohasset, Duxbury, Hanover, Hingham,
Holbrook, Hull, Marshfield, Norwell, Pembroke, Rockland,
Scituate, Weymouth
Arlington, Belmont, Boston, Brookline, Cambridge,
Chelsea, Everett, Lynn, Malden, Medford, Melrose, Milton,
Newton, Quincy, Revere, Saugus, Somerville, Waltham,
Watertowu, Winthrop
3
Attachment C
Overview ofMPO Member Responsibilities
Background:
The Metropolitan Planning Organization is established as a required part of the transportation planning
process under federal law. It is responsible for planning and programming financial resources for a
multi-modal transportation system for the Boston region. The MPO was established in 1973.
The Boston MPO Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that details the governing structure and
process of the MPO can be viewed at http://www.bostomnpo.org/mou
Specific Responsibilities:
The MPO must prepare and approve several plans and programs on an annual basis. These include:
• The Unified Planning Work Program (UPWP), which programs funds for transportation
planning programs in the region;
• The Transportation Improvement Program (TIP), which programs federal, state, and local
funding for surface transportation projects (highway and transit).
The MPO also prepares and approves several other plans and programs as necessary. These include:
• The Regional Transportation Plan (RTP), which provides a 25-year plan for the Region’s
transportation needs and priorities and;
• The conformity of all surface transportation plans and programs with applicable federal laws
(including air quality, and the Americans with Disabilities Act).
MPO Meetings:
Meetings are held as needed to accomplish the MPO’s business. There are approximately two MPO
meetings a month and all but four are held in Boston, during the day, at the state transportation building.
Four MPO meetings will be held (one per quarter) outside of Boston. MPO meetings typically begin at
10 AM on the first and third Thursday of the month, and last approximately three hours. The MPO has
the authority to establish necessary committees to accomplish its responsibilities. Recent experience
suggests that the municipal members of the MPO or their designees attend at least two meetings per
month to accomplish the work of the MPO.
5
Official Notice
2013 Boston Region MPO Municipal Election Procedures
At the MAPC Fall Council Meeting, end of October 20 13 (date, time, location TBD), elections will be
held for two (2) of the twelve (12) elected municipal seats on the Boston Region Metropolitan Planning
Organization (MPO). At that time two (2) municipalities (each representing an MAPC Subregion) will
be elected to the MPO by the chief elected officials of the 101 municipalities which constitute the
Boston metropolitan region. Pursuant to the MPO Memorandum of Understanding, approved on July 7,
20 11, MAPC and the MBTA Advisory Board (Advisory Board) administer the election of the municipal
representatives to the MPO.
MPO Seats Up For Election
One (I) municipality from the Iuner Core Committee.
One (I) municipality from the MetroWest Regional Collaborative.
Terms of election on the MPO are for three years.
Nomination Process
Nominees for the elected municipal seats shall be the chief elected official of the municipality. In cities
this is the Mayor or, if the city does not have the office of Mayor, then the Chairman of the Council,
with the exception of Plan E cities (Cambridge) in which case it shall be the City Manager. In towns,
the chief elected official is the Chairman of the Board of Selectmen. The MPO will accept the
Chairman’s nomination of a candidate whether or not the full Board of Selectman has voted it.
A nominee for an open municipal seat must receive five nominations made by any chief elected official
from the Boston region, regardless of which sub-region they are from. A chief elected official may
nominate his or her municipality and that nomination shall count as one of the five nominations needed
to place a municipality on the ballot. Each chief elected official may only sign nomination papers for
one municipality per sub-region for the two open seats.
Nominations papers are due on Friday, September 27, 2013 to MAPC by 5:00 PM and must be
filed in person or by mail at MAPC, 60 Temple Place, 6th Floor, Boston, MA 02111, Attn: MPO
Elections. Faxes or emails will not be accepted. Nomination papers shall include a statement of
candidacy (250 word limit) of the community, also due on September 27.
Voting Process
Each ofthe 101 municipalities may vote for one (I) municipality from each ofthe two (2) open subregional
seats.
Ballot
A ballot will be prepared by MAPC and the Advisory Board based on the certification of nomination
papers. The ballot shall contain a list of the nominated municipalities. Candidate communities shall
appear on the ballot in an order drawn by lot by designated officers ofMAPC and the Advisory Board.
The subregion of each of the communities shall be identified on the ballot. A candidates’ booklet shall
be issued that shall contain the statement of candidacy of the communities. The list of communities
shall appear in the booklet in the same order that they appear on the ballot. In a second mailing, MAPC
and the Advisory Board will include an absentee ballot and instructions for how municipalities can cast
their vote.
I
——–~~~
SUBREGION
North Shore Task Force
North Suburban Planning
Council
Minuteman Advisory Group
Interlocal Coordination
(MAGIC)
MetroWest Regional
Collaborative
South West Advisory
Planning Committee (SWAP)
Three Rivers (TRIC)
South Shore Coalition
Inner Core
Attachment A
MAPC Sub-regions
COMMUNITIES
Beverly, Danvers, Essex, Gloucester, Hamilton, Ipswich,
Manchester-by-the-Sea, Marblehead, Middleton, Nahant,
Peabody, Rockport, Salem, Swampscott, Topsfield,
Wenham
Burlington, Lynnfield, North Reading, Reading,
Stoneham, Wakefield, Wilmington, Winchester,
Woburn
Acton, Bedford, Bolton, Boxborough, Carlisle,
Concord, Hudson, Lexington, Littleton, Lincoln,
Maynard, Stow, Sudbury
Ashland, Framingham, Holliston, Marlborough, Natick,
Southborough, Wayland, Wellesley, Weston
Bellingham, Dover, Franklin, Hopkinton, Medway,
Milford, Millis, Norfolk, Sherborn, Wrentham
Canton, Dedham, Dover, Foxborough, Medfield, Milton,
Needham, Norwood, Randolph, Sharon, Stoughton,
Walpole, Westwood
Braintree, Cohasset, Duxbury, Hanover, Hingham,
Holbrook, Hull, Marshfield, Norwell, Pembroke, Rockland,
Scituate, Weymouth
Arlington, Belmont, Boston, Brookline, Cambridge,
Chelsea, Everett, Lynn, Malden, Medford, Melrose, Milton,
Newton, Quincy, Revere, Saugus, Somerville, Waltham,
Watertown, Winthrop
3
Attachment C
Overview ofMPO Member Responsibilities
Background:
The Metropolitan Planning Organization is established as a required part of the transportation planning
process under federal law. It is responsible for planning and programming financial resources for a
multi-modal transportation system for the Boston region. The MPO was established in 1973.
The Boston MPO Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that details the governing structure and
process of the MPO can be viewed at http://www.bostonmpo.org/mou
Specific Responsibilities:
The MPO must prepare and approve several plans and programs on an annual basis. These include:
• The Unified Planning Work Program (UPWP), which programs funds for transportation
planning programs in the region;
• The Transportation Improvement Program (TIP), which programs federal, state, and local
funding for surface transportation projects (highway and transit).
The MPO also prepares and approves several other plans and programs as necessary. These include:
• The Regional Transportation Plan (RTP), which provides a 25-year plan for the Region’s
transportation needs and priorities and;
• The conformity of all surface transportation plans and programs with applicable federal laws
(including air quality, and the Americans with Disabilities Act).
MPO Meetings:
Meetings are held as needed to accomplish the MPO’s business. There are approximately two MPO
meetings a month and all but four are held in Boston, during the day, at the state transportation building.
Four MPO meetings will be held (one per quarter) outside of Boston. MPO meetings typically begin at
10 AM on the first and third Thursday of the month, and last approximately three hours. The MPO has
the authority to establish necessary committees to accomplish its responsibilities. Recent experience
suggests that the municipal members of the MPO or their designees attend at least two meetings per
month to accomplish the work of the MPO.
5
I
1 c __ . __ ..
2013 MPO Statement of Candidacy
(250 Word Limit)
Municipality: ___________ _
Chief Elected Official: ____________ _
(Suggestions include a brief statement of qualifications; comments on the importance of
transportation to the region; and expectations for the Boston Metropolitan Planning
Organization)
——– ———– —-2013 MPOElection
Nomination Papers
Nominated Community Name of Chief Elected
Official
Signature
Open MPO Seat Community
is Running For D Inner Core
Seat
D MetroWest Seat
(only check one)
Nominating Community
Endorsers
Name of Chief Elected
Official
Signature
Individual endorsements may be attached as a separate letter but must specifY the municipality and the
official being nominated and must be signed by the chief elected official of the endorsing community.
Please return in person or by mail
By 5 PM on Friday, September 27, 2013 to:
Marc Draisen, Executive Director
Metropolitan Area Planning Council
60 Temple Place
Boston, MA 02111
Phone inquiries to
Eric Bourassa, MAPC (617) 933 -0740
Paul Regan, MBTA Advisory Board (617) 426-6054
Morse Drive Neighborhood Block Party: Saturday, September 28 – medfield.net – SmarterMaii
Morse Drive Neighborhood Block Party: Saturday, September 28
Wed 8/7/20134:41 PM
From: stella.demopoulos@comcast.net
~~ _To:_eclarke@medfield.net ____ ~_~~
Cc: Sophia Poulopoulos
Hi Evelyn,
Page 1 of 1
It was a pleasure speaking with you today. Below, please find the information you requested
required to obtain the permit for our neighborhood block party.
As you know, I’m requesting a permit for a neighborhood block party for Saturday Sept 28,
2013 (rain date of Sunday, September 29, 2013). This would be our 3rd annual get together
and it’s a great opportunity to ~et the neighborhood families together. The location for the block
party will be Morse Drive; ~ d – ‘I P I’Vl
I understand the Selectman’s meeting is scheduled for August 20th and we should hear from
you shortly thereafter with a decision.
Please, let me know if you require additional information.
Best Regards,
Stella Demopoulos
http://mail.medfield.netiMainlfrmMessagePrint.aspx?popup=true&messageid=22352&folder=Inbox&user=ecIarke&domain=medfield.net&mapped=True… 8/8/2013

eBills now available

Per the email e-newsletter today from the Massachusetts Department of Revenue’s Division of Local Services the town can now opt to offer residents e-bills for all their town bills, plus the town can now bundle multiple bills (e.g. – real estate tax bill plus the water and sewer bill) in one transmission –

Ask DLS
City and Town Editorial Board

This month’s Ask DLS features frequently asked questions about e-billing. We hope the answers will provide timely and helpful information. Please let us know if you have other areas of interest or send a question to cityandtown@dor.state.ma.us. We’d like to hear from you!

Can cities and towns send property tax or other bills by email?

With the approval of the Municipal Relief Act on July 27, 2010 (c. 188 of the Acts of 2010), cities and towns are now authorized to issue property tax bills in electronic form. Section 54 of the Act amends M.G.L. C. 60 by adding new language to Section 3A that allows tax bills to be sent by email and other bills and nonpolitical information to be inserted with the mailing.

The local decision to allow issuance of the so-called “e-bills” rests with the board of selectmen in a town and the mayor in a city. There are two primary components to the authorization:

1.) Like hardcopy bills, electronic property tax bills must be in a form approved by the Commissioner of Revenue and must meet the “content” requirements imposed by c.60, s.3A, subsection (a), which are unchanged; and

2.) The program must be voluntary. Taxpayers cannot be forced to receive an electronic bill.

The legislation encourages a paperless system where the only tax bill received by property owners would be an email copy. Savings would be realized through the elimination of printed bills and postage for mailings two or four times a year. To receive an electronic bill or notice, taxpayers must explicitly enroll and provide their email address to the collector.

In addition, municipal collectors are permitted to include, with the electronic property tax bill, other charges for water or sewer use, solid waste disposal or collection, or electric, gas or other utility services. These can only include charges that are authorized by ordinance or by-law and that are assessed by the city or town. The inserted bills or notices of payments due must be separate and distinct from the property tax bills. In the case where a separate commission oversees the water or sewer operation, it rather than the selectmen or mayor would authorize utility e-bills.

The authority previously granted to municipalities to include nonpolitical informational material in an envelope with the tax bill is now expanded. The inclusion of additional information with an email tax bill is permitted, but requires the approval of the selectmen or mayor.

In developing an electronic tax bill program, the municipal collector should work with local assessors and a technology advisor. Among other topics, consideration might be given to the following:

Program Management: Consideration of the tax billing process, staffing, web access and software capability should help local officials determine the most practical option for managing the program. In most instances, we would expect this to be collector’s office, which has the legal responsibility to send proper notice of the tax due. The same analysis should be completed relative to any other bills allowed to be inserted with the electronic tax bill. Alternatively, companies are emerging that will contract with a city or town to manage its e-billing program.

Enrollment: Property owners should have the ability to enroll on-line at a dedicated town webpage. A verification mechanism must be built into the process. For instance, enrollment could be confirmed through a required return email acknowledgement by the property owner. The pertinent information could then be incorporated automatically into a data base. Over-the-counter enrollment or enrollment by mail is also an option and must include a written enrollment acknowledgement. Staff time would then have to data enter the information into the system or program.

Technology: For tax bills, whether in the assessors’ appraisal system or a collector’s billing system, software should allow property accounts to be flagged where owners have requested an electronic bill. The taxpayer’s billing account would remain in the commitment, but no hardcopy bill would be printed or mailed. A similar process should be developed for other types of bills that might be inserted with the electronic property tax bill. In each instance, the collector should have the ability to print a copy of the bill, if needed.

Legal: At the time of enrollment to receive an e-bill, property owners should be required to, at least, acknowledge that:

  • they understand by enrolling they will not receive a bill in the mail or in any other hardcopy form;
  • they are responsible for the accuracy of the information provided;
  • they are solely responsible for reporting any changes to the information on file;
  • they are not relieved of the legal obligation to make timely payment if they fail to receive a tax bill, or any other bill, because of incorrect information;
  • they attest to the truth and accuracy of the information provided.

Medfield Energy Committee

The Medfield Energy Committee met last night.

  • looking to proceed to have Medfield opt to become a Green Community at the next annual town meeting (ATM) under the 2008 Massachusetts Green Communities Act.  The GCA requires a (1) commitment to a plan to effect 20% savings on energy use, (2) as of right for energy projects, (3) use of energy efficient vehicles, (4) adoption of the stretch building code, and (5) adoption of expedited permitting for energy saving items.  In exchange for becoming a Green Community, the state awards grants, usually around $100,000 the first year.  Being a Green Community is the right choice both to save the town monies, as well as to reduce the town’s carbon footprint.
  • solar PV installations – a municipal installation on land at the Waste Water Treatment Plant, and an exploration of other sites.  They will apply for a state DOER Owner’s Agents Technical Grant of $12,500 for assistance in determining best locations to site solar PV arrays in town.
  • executed a plan to provide for energy saving inclusions in the planned municipal buildings – a list of items will be created and shared with the Building Committee, an da member will attend Building Committee meetings.
  • since the Medfield Energy Committee started work in 2008, the town has reduced its energy usage by about 28-29%
  • interesting websites = DSIRE.org (lists all incentives available via energy saving items)

Westboro pays only $2.2 m for WSH

Westboro is the first town buying state land under a new Massachusetts state partnership plan with towns, and Medfield is to be the second.

Today it was announced that

  • Westboro will pay $2.2 m. for the 95 acre former Westboro State Hospital campus,
  • the state will finance the purchase over ten years, and
  • Westboro will not even require an Proposition 2 1/2 override vote given those terms.

See newspaper article

DCAMM has been telling the Town of Medfield that

  • DCAMM wants the town to buy the former Medfield State Hospital site,
  • DCAMM will price it to recoup someof its sunk costs at the Medfield State Hospital site it will be treasferring
  • DCAMM will give the town incentive to develop the site and incentive s to do so quickly

DCAMM has put off telling the Town of Medfield just how much it will be seeking for the Medfield State Hospital site, most recently again just this week while it gets approval from higher ups.

Charter & Bylaw Review

Last night I attended the meeting of the Charter & Bylaw Review Committee, called because the committee had just gotten back from its publisher/consultant, General Code, the draft codification of the items that were submitted for codification, namely

  • the town charter,
  • the town bylaws, and
  • the zoning bylaws.

Hard copies of the draft were distributed to committee members for their review and the committee will meet again on 8/27/13 to discuss General Code’s apparent suggestions for edits.

Next the committee will collect all the rest of the town regulations from each department (e.g. – the schools, the Medfield Police Department, the Medfield Fire Department, the Board of Health, and all other departments), so that copies of those can be added as appendices, thereby putting all the town rules and regulations in one place.  A conscious decision was made at General Code’s suggestion, to codify only the three major items (charter, bylaws, and zoning), and to have the rest as attached appendices.  Once the result is worked through, the materials will be on-line for the public.

The committee appeared to refer to the Medfield State Hospital Advisory Committee the task of reviewing what new bylaws the town needs in light of the possible development of the Medfield State Hospital site.  Such rules and regulations could also assure that the town is properly positioned for other large developments, such as The Parc on West Street.

Examples of such possible new rules and regulations might include the following –

  • does the town want to be notified before hazardous materials are transported through town,
  • does the town want to be able to specify the routes that hazardous materials transported through town must use,
  • does the town want to be able to control the hours during which any work may take place
  • does the town want to be able to control the amount of noise created by construction work
  • does the town want to be able to control the amount of dust created by construction work

Someone needs to be looking into whether the Town of Medfield should have any such controls going forward, and if we want any, to recommend just which ones to have.  The annual town meeting (ATM) will then ultimately decide whether any such new proposed rules and regulations are actually adopted.

If any individual resident is interested in assisting the town by undertaking the needed review of what new bylaws the town should perhaps enact in light of the possible Medfield State Hospital site development and other developments in town, please contact me.  I think there is an opportunity for a motivated resident to do such a review for the town

  • by reviewing what other towns have done (much of that is already in hand),
  • by polling all the departments about what each sees as being needed, and
  • by brainstorming what would be best.

It could be an interesting time limited project, and one that will be extremely useful and important to the future of the town.

West Nile Virus

The state regularly collects and tests mosquitoes for West Nile Virus, and recently told the town that one from the northwest part of town tested positive.  They do not increase the threat level for one mosquito, I am told.
See the town website for the information.  ==> this morning I have added that information from the town website below –

Town of Medfield ~ Board of Health
459 Main Street, Medfield, MA
508 ! 906-3006
West Nile Vil’lls Confil’me(1 in Mosquitoes in Medfield
DATE: August 13,2013
TOWN: Medfield
CONTACT: Nancy Bennotti
TELEPHONE: 508·906·3006
The Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) announced today that West Nile virus (WNV) has been detected in mosqnitoes collected from Medfield, Massachusetts, WNV is most commonly transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected mosquito. The mosquitoes that carry this virus are common throughout the state, and are found in urban as well as more rural areas. While WNV can infect people of all ages, people over the age of 50 are at higher risk for severe infection.
By taking a few, common·sense precautions, people can help to protect themselves and their loved ones:
Avoid Mosquito Bites
• Be Aware of Peak Mosquito Hom·s· The hours from dusk to dawn are peak biting times for many mosquitoes.  Consider rescheduling outdoor activities that occur during evening or early morning. If you are outdoors at any time and notice mosquitoes around you, take steps to avoid being bitten by moving indoors, covering up and/or wearing repellant.
• Clothing Can Help reduce mosquito bites. Although it may be difficult to do when it’s hot, wearing long·sleeves,  long pants and socks when outdoors will help keep mosquitoes away from your skin.
• Apply Insect Repellent when you go outdoors. Use a repellent with DEET (N, N·diethyl·m·toluamide), pel’methrin, pical’idin (KBR 3023), IR3535 or oil oflemon eucalyptus [p-methane 3, 8·diol (PMD)] according to the instructions on the product label. DEET products should not be used on infants under two months of age and
should be used in concentrations of 30% or less on older children. Oil of lemon eucalyptus should not be used on children under three years of age. Permethrin products are intended for use on items such as clothing, shoes, bed nets and camping gear and should not be applied to skin.
Mosquito·Pl’oof Your Home
• Drain Standing Water – Many mosquitoes lay their eggs in standing water. Limit the number of places around your home for mosquitoes to breed by either draining or getting rid of items that hold water. Check rain gutters and drains. Empty any unused flowerpots and wading pools, and change water in birdbaths frequently.
• Install 01′ Repair Screens· Some mosquitoes like to come indoors. Keep them outside by having tightly·fitting screens on all of your windows and doors.
Information about WNV and reports of current and historical WNV virus activity in Massachusetts can be found on the MDPH website at http://www.mass.gov/dph/wnv.

WHAT IS WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV)?
West Nile virus is a mosquito-carried virus that usually causes mild or no illness in humans. In rare cases, WNV can cause encephalitis (swelling of the brain) or meningitis (swelling of the lining of the brain and spinal.cord).

IS WNV IN MASSACHUSETTS?
Yes. WNV has been found in Massachusetts in birds, mosquitoes, horses and humans.

HOW IS WNV SPREAD?
WNV is most common’ly spread to people by the bite of an infected mosquito. It may also be spread through blood transfusions or organ transplants. There are reports that WNV may be passed from pregnant or breastfeeding women to their babies. However, the risk to an unborn or breastfeeding baby is still unknown.

SHOULD I REPORT DEAD BIRDS?
No. Tracking and testing dead birds for WNV is no longer a useful way to find the virus. Mosquito collection and testing gives the most reliable indication of current WNV activity and this is where monitoring efforts will continue to be focused. Dead birds can be safely disposed of in the trash. Using gloves, a shovel or plastic bags covering your hands, the dead bird should be doublebagged and placed in the trash. You should then wash your hands.

WHAT IS MY CITY OR TOWN DOING TO CONTROL MOSQUITOES?
Mosquito control activities are conducted during the mosquito season in many communities. Call your local board of health (usually listed in the phone book under ‘government’) for information specific to your area.

I’VE BEEN BITTEN BY A MOSQUITO. SHOULD I BE TESTED FOR WNV?
No. IIInesses caused by mosquito bites are very rare. Very few mosquito bites carry any risk. People who are bitten by mosquitoes carrying the WNV will usually experience no illness or very mild illness. However, you should see a health care provider immediately if you develop symptoms such as:
• high fever • severe headache • confusion
• stiff neck • muscle weakness • sensitivity to light
Patients with mild symptoms usually recover completely and do not require any specific medication or laboratory testing. Less than 1 % of people infected with WNV develop serious illness. People older than 50 years of age have a higher risk of developing severe illness such as encephalitis.

IS THERE TREATMENT OR A VACCINE FOR WNV?
There is no human vaccine or specific treatment for WNV infection, but health care providers can treat the symptoms of WNV. In severe cases, hospitalization may be needed to provide supportive care.
Protect Yourself

Your risk of getting ill from WNV is low, but you can lower your risk even more by trying to avoid mosquito bites. Here are some things you can do to reduce your chances of being bitten by a mosquito.
• Schedule outdoor events t o avoid the hours between dusk and dawn when mosqUltoes are most actIve.
• When you’re outdoors, wear a long-sleeved shirt, long pants and socks.
• Use a mosquito repellent that contains DEET, picaridin, IR3535 or oil of lemon eucalyptus.
>- Products with pelmethrin may be used but should only be applied on clothing. Always follow the directions on the label.
>- DEET products should not be used on infants under 2 months of age.  Children older than two months should use DEET concentrations of30% or less.
>- Oil of lemon eucalyptus should not be used on children under three years of age.
• Make sure window and door screens do not have holes in them.
Remove Standing Water
Mosquitoes grow in standing (stagnant) water. Getting rid of that water helps to lower the number of mosquitoes in your area. Look around outside your house for containers and other things that might collect water and turn them over, regularly empty them, or dispose of them.
Unused flower pots
m Trash cans and lids
Storm gutters
Questions?
Tires Wading pools
Call the Massachusetts Department of Public Health Information Line at 1-866-MASS WNV (627-7968) or visit our web site: http://www.mass.gov/dph

PUBLIC HEALTH
FACT SHEET
Mosquito
Rep’ellents
Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH), 305 South Street, Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
What is a mosquito repellent?
A mosquito repellent is a substance put on skin, clothing, or other surfaces which discourages mosquitoes from
landing or crawling on that surface. .
Why should I use a mosquito repellent?
Mosquitoes can spread viruses that cause serious diseases. In Massachusetts, the diseases spread by mosquitoes are
West Nile virus (Wl\tV) and eastern equine encephalitis (EEE). Mosquito repellents can reduce your chances of
being bitten by a mosquito and cap reduce the risk that you will get one of these diseases.
When should ,I use a mosquito repellent?
Use a mosquito repellent when you are outside and exposed to mosquitoes. Mosquitoes are generally most active
between dusk and dawn, though some types may also be out during the day. Mosquitoes usually start to become
active during early or mid-spring and remain active until the first hard frost (when the ground freezes).
,·································4···················.’.’ ..
j II” Did you know?
i Every year from approximately late May until the first hard frost, mosquito samples are collected from
I various locations around the state and tested for WNV and EEE virus. Visit the MDPH website at ! http://www.mass.gov/dph/wnv during the mosquito season to see where positive mosquito samples have
l…………………………….. ………………..•……………..•… ………….. ~.”..”.~:.:~~~d:…………………………………………………………………. ………… .
Which repellent should I use?
Different repellents work against different bugs. It is important to look at the active ingredient on the product label.
Repellents that contain DEET (N, N-diethyl·m·toluamide), permethrin, IR3535 (3·[N·butyl·N-acetyl]aminopropionic
acid) or picaridin (KBR 3023) provide protection against mosquitoes. In addition, oil oflemon
eucalyptus [p.menthane 3, 8·diol (PMD)] has been found to provide as much protection as low concentrations of
DEET when tested against mosquitoes found in the United States.
DEET products should not be used on infants under 2 months of age. Children older than two months should use
products with DEET concentrations of30% or less. DEET products are available in formulations up to 100%
DEET, so always read the product label to determine the percentage ofDEET included. Products with DEET
concentrations higher than 30% do not confer much additional protection, but do last longer. In a study that looked
at how long different concentrations of DEET worked against mosquitoes, the results ranged from I Y, to 5 hours.
However, the length of protection time will vary widely depending on temperature, perspiration, and water exposure.
DEET%: 4.75% ..6 .65% 20% 23.8%
Protection time in hours: 2 4 5
Permethrin products are intended for use on items such as clothing, shoes, bed nets and camping gear and should
not be applied to skin. Apply the permethrin to your clothes before you put them on and follow the product’s
instructions.
Oil of lemon eucalyptus products should not be used on children under the age of three years.
Always Use Repellents Safely
.:. Follow the instructions given on the product label. If you have questions after reading the label, such
as how many hours does the product work for, or if and how often it should be reapplied, contact the
manufacturer .
• :. Don’t use repellents under clothing .
• :. Don’t use repellents on cuts or irritated skin .
• :. Don’t use repellents near the mouth or eyes and use them sparingly around the ears. When using spray
products, spray the product onto your hands first, and then apply it to your face .
• :. Use just enough product to lightly c’over exposed skin and/or clothing. Putting pn a larger amount does
not make the product work any better .
• :. Don’t let children handle the product. When using repellents on children, put some on your hands first,
and then apply it to the child. Don’t put repellents on a child’s hands .
• :. When you come inside, wash your skin and the clothes that had repellent on them .
• :. If you develop a rash 01′ ,other symptoms you think were caused by using a repellent, stop using
the product, wash the affected area with soap and water, and contact your doctor or local poison control
center. If you go to the doctor, bring the product with you to show him or her.
Do “natural” repellents work?
A number of plant-derived products are available for use as mosquito repellents, including oil of lemon eucalyptus
and IR3535. Limited information is available regarding how well most of these products work and how safe they
are. The information that is available shows that most of these products generally do not provide the same level or
duration of protection as products like DEET or permethrin, except for oil oflemon eucalyptus and IR3535, which
have been found to provide as much protection as low concentrations ofDEET.
I’m concerned about using repellents on my infant. What else can I do to
protect my infant from mosquitoes?
Mosquitoes are most active between dusk and dawn, so try to avoid outdoor activities with your infant during these
times. When your infant is outside, use mosquito netting on baby carriages or playpens and consider going indoors
if you notice a lot of mosquito activity.
Where can I get more information?
• The Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH), Division of Epidemiology and Immunization at (617)
983-6800 or toll-free at (888) 658-2850, or on the MDPH Arbovirus website at http://www.mass.gov/dphlwnv, Or your
local board of health (listed in the telephone directory under local govermnent).
• Health effects of pesticides, MDPH, Center for Environmental Health at 617-624-5757
• Mosquito control in your city or town: Mosquito control in Massachusetts is conducted through nine mosquito
control districts. The State Reclamation and Mosquito Control Board (SRMCB) oversees all nine districts.
Contact information for each district can be found online at http://www.mass.gov/agr/mosquito/districts.htm. You may
also contact the SRMCB within the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources at 617-626-1777 or your
local board of health.
• Information on repellents (such as choosing the right repellent, using repellents on children or pregnant women,
or detailed toxicology information), National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC) toll free at 1-800-858-7378 or
online at http://npic.orst.edu/index.html
Updated: March 2011