Category Archives: Water & Sewer

Watering lawns now prohibited

An alert from the Town of Medfield DPW –

Water Restriction Update – No Outdoor Water Use

** Updated October 14, 2020 **

All nonessential outdoor water use prohibited

Following the state’s declaration of a Level 3 drought for the Charles River watershed, the Town of Medfield is now subject to a mandatory prohibition on all nonessential water use. This restriction goes into effect immediately and remains in effect until further notice. This state-mandated restriction prohibits all nonessential outdoor water use. The state’s announcement of the new restrictions can be found at this link. 

In addition, since Monday, September 28, 2020, the Town has been working on a long-planned maintenance project on the Mt. Nebo Water Tower that will take approximately two months to complete. The Mt. Nebo Water Tower has been drained and taken temporarily offline. The Town’s contractor is making repairs to and painting the outside of the water tower as well as making repairs to the interior of the tank. This project will extend the life of the water tower. The Town currently has only one water tower in operation (the Medfield State Hospital Water Tower). 

The Medfield Board of Water and Sewage and the Medfield Water Department will continue to monitor the weather, water demand, and the Town’s infrastructure throughout the Mt. Nebo project.

Thank you to all residents for your continued diligence in helping to conserve our water resources. 

A Tier 5 water restriction prohibits nonessential outdoor water use. 

Examples of nonessential outdoor water use that are now prohibited include:

  • Irrigation of lawns, gardens, flowers, and ornamental plants via handheld hoses.
  • Uses that are not required for health or safety reasons
  • Irrigation of lawns via sprinklers or automatic irrigation systems
  • Washing of vehicles other than by means of a commercial car wash, except as necessary for operator safety
  • Washing of exterior building surfaces, parking lots, driveways or sidewalks, except as necessary to apply paint, preservatives, stucco, pavement or cement

This water restriction was put into place due to the state’s Level 3 drought declaration for the Charles River watershed.  

The Town’s Water Rules and Regulations include additional information on water restrictions and can be found at this link. MassDEP maintains a list of all communities with water restrictions in place. 

Water uses not subject to mandatory restrictions are those required:

  • For health or safety reasons
  • By regulation
  • For the production of food and fiber
  • For the maintenance of livestock
  • To meet the core functions of a business (for example, irrigation by plant nurseries as necessary to maintain stock).

Thank you for adhering to this new water restriction and working together to reduce our water consumption.

Questions about the water restriction can be directed to Director of Public Works Maurice Goulet at 508-906-3004 or mgoulet@medfield.net

Weekend work on Mt Nebo water tower

Public Works

Posted on: October 2, 2020

Mt. Nebo Work Saturday, 10/3, and Sunday, 10/4

The Town’s contractor, Inspec Coatings, will be working on the Mt. Nebo Water Tower on Saturday, October 3, 2020 and Sunday, October 4, 2020. Since the Mt. Nebo Water Tower will be offline for the duration of the project, the Town has accepted Inspec Coatings request to work on Saturday and Sunday. The sooner the project is complete, the sooner the Mt. Nebo Water Tower can be returned to service.

Watering now hand held only

Public Works

Posted on: August 16, 2020

Water Restriction Elevated to Tier 4

Nonessential water use prohibited

On Friday, August 14, 2020, following a drought declaration declared by the Commonwealth, the Board of Water and Sewer has announced that Medfield is now subject to a Tier 4 Water Restriction. This restriction goes into effect immediately and will remain in effect until further notice.

A Tier 4 water restriction prohibits nonessential water use. 

Examples of nonessential outdoor water use that are now prohibited:

  • Uses that are not required for health or safety reasons
  • Irrigation of lawns via sprinklers or automatic irrigation systems
  • Washing of vehicles other than by means of a commercial car wash, except as necessary for operator safety
  • Washing of exterior building surfaces, parking lots, driveways or sidewalks, except as necessary to apply paint, preservatives, stucco, pavement or cement

Example of acceptable outdoor water use that is not affected:

  • Irrigation of lawns, gardens, flowers, and ornamental plants via handheld hoses only

Please note that allowed use is not permitted between the hours of 9 am and 5 pm when evaporation and evapotranspiration are highest. 

This water restriction was put into place due to the drought declaration which triggered Restrictions based on Water Management Act Permit. In addition, daily water usage has continued to increase, despite the Tier 3 water restriction that limited water use to every other day. The Town’s water pumps are running significantly more hours per day than is typical, increasing the risk of mechanical issues. In addition, water levels in the Town’s storage tanks have declined. 

The Town’s Water Rules and Regulations include additional information on water restrictions and can be found at this link. MassDEP maintains a list of all communities with water restrictions in place. 

Water uses not subject to mandatory restrictions are those required:

  • For health or safety reasons
  • By regulation
  • For the production of food and fiber
  • For the maintenance of livestock
  • To meet the core functions of a business (for example, irrigation by plant nurseries as necessary to maintain stock).

Thank you for adhering to this new water restriction and working together to reduce our water consumption.

Questions about the water restriction can be directed to Director of Public Works Maurice Goulet at 508-906-3002 or mgoulet@medfield.net

Drought declared by state = hand watering only

HAND WATERING ONLY RESTRICTIONS COMING: Town required by state to “Adopt and implement the state’s nonessential outdoor water use restrictions for drought; Level 2 restriction calls for limiting outdoor watering to hand-held hoses or watering cans, to be used only after 5 p.m. or before 9 a.m.

From: Massachusetts Water Works Association <jpederson@masswaterworks.org>
Date: Thu, Aug 13, 2020 at 4:45 PM
Subject: Drought Declaration
To: <mgoulet@medfield.net>

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
August 13, 2020

Significant Drought Conditions Declared Across Massachusetts

Above Normal Temperatures, Below Normal Rainfall Lead to Level 2 Drought Throughout Commonwealth

BOSTON — Due to above normal temperatures throughout July and early August and more than three months of below normal rainfall, Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA) Secretary Kathleen Theoharides today declared a Level 2 – Significant Drought in all seven regions of the Commonwealth – the Western, Connecticut River Valley, Central, Northeast, Southeast, Cape Cod, and Islands regions. At a Level 2 – Significant Drought, as outlined in the Massachusetts Drought Management Plan, conditions are becoming significantly dry and warrant detailed monitoring of drought conditions, close coordination among state and federal agencies, emphasis on water conservation, more stringent watering restrictions, and technical outreach and assistance for the affected municipalities.

“The combination of three months of limited rainfall and well above normal temperatures through July and early August have led to very dry conditions in every region of Massachusetts,” said Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary Kathleen Theoharides. “All levels of government are coordinating to address these critical drought conditions, and it is essential that residents and businesses across the Commonwealth take extra care to conserve water both indoors and outdoors and be mindful of the increased risk of wildlife when using any fire or smoking materials.”

“Because the Commonwealth continues to experience drought conditions across the state, the public is urged to continue conserving water in order to reduce the demand on water supplies,” said Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) Director Samantha Phillips. “Dry conditions increase the threat of brush and wildland fires, so we urge residents to exercise caution when using charcoal grills, matches, and other open flames during outdoor activities and to call 911 immediately if there is a fire to prevent the fire from spreading.” 

The declaration was informed by recommendations and discussions from a recent meeting of the Drought Management Task Force (DMTF), composed of state and federal officials and other entities, and will remain in effect until water levels return to normal in the affected regions.

Temperatures remain well above normal, as the Commonwealth recorded the second hottest July on record last month. Rainfall was scattered across the state with only a few areas receiving above normal precipitation; most areas were in a deficit by 1 to 3 inches. Meanwhile, temperatures throughout the first two weeks of August are 2 to 4 degrees above normal throughout Massachusetts, with warmer than normal temperatures predicted in the coming weeks and months. While most regions of the Commonwealth are experiencing a classic long-term drought, the Southeast, Cape Cod, and Islands regions are experiencing conditions akin to a ‘flash drought’ which is a rapid onset drought with decreased precipitation, above normal temperatures, and incoming radiation resulting in abnormally high evapotranspiration all combining to increase fire danger and decrease crop moisture levels.

Additionally, wildland fire risk continues across the state. Extended drought conditions have rendered grasses, shrubs and forest fuels very dry across most of the state, and extremely dry in areas of the Southeast, resulting in increased wildfire risk and added challenges for firefighting agencies. Long term precipitation deficits have also led to extremely dry soil conditions, which results in fires burning deep into the ground, and taking multiple days to extinguish. These conditions exhaust local resources and increase risk to firefighter safety.  Fire officials remind the public to be very aware of this situation, and to be careful with all open burning and disposal of combustible materials. 

The state continues to intensely monitor and assess the drought situation, and any associated environmental and agricultural impacts. Task Force officials also noted that the state’s streamflow saw overall improvement in July because of scattered rainfall. However, within the first two weeks of August, conditions seem to have worsened, with well below normal streamflow observed in most regions. The state asks residents in every region across the Commonwealth to be very mindful of the amount of water they are using, to be proactive in reducing or eliminating outdoor water use, to reduce indoor water use, and to address plumbing leaks as soon as possible. Limiting nonessential outdoor watering is one of the most effective ways to minimize the impacts of drought on water supply and the environment, and ensure there is enough water for fire protection. All these steps will help reduce water use to ensure essential needs such as drinking water and fire protection are being met, and habitats have enough water to recover.

For Regions in Level 2 – Significant Drought

Residents and Businesses:

  • Minimize overall water use;
  • Limit outdoor watering to hand-held hoses or watering cans, to be used only after 5 p.m. or before 9 a.m.one day a week.

Immediate Steps for Communities:

  • Adopt and implement the state’s nonessential outdoor water use restrictions for drought; Level 2 restriction calls for limiting outdoor watering to hand-held hoses or watering cans, to be used only after 5 p.m. or before 9 a.m.
  • Limit or prohibit installation of new sod, seeding, and/or landscaping; watering during or within 48 hours after measurable rainfall; washing of hard surfaces (sidewalks, patios, driveways, siding); personal vehicle or boat washing; operation of non-recirculating fountains; filling of swimming pools, hot tubs, and backyard informal rinks.
  • Implement drought surcharge or seasonal water rates.
  • Establish water-use reduction targets for all water users and identify top water users and conduct targeted outreach to help curb their use. 

Short- and Medium-Term Steps for Communities:

  • Establish a year-round water conservation program that includes public education and communication;
  • Provide timely information to local residents and businesses;
  • Check emergency inter-connections for water supply; and
  • Develop a local drought management plan using guidance outlined in the state Drought Management Plan.

The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) continues to provide technical assistance to communities on managing systems, including assistance on use of emergency connections and water supplies, as well as assisting towns on how to request a declaration of drought emergency.

“Water suppliers should continue to work with their customers and educate them on strategies to manage demand during this time period,” said MassDEP Commissioner Martin Suuberg. “It is essential that regions across Massachusetts embrace conservation practices to avoid added stress on drinking water resources and other water-dependent habitats.”

The Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) water supply system is not currently experiencing drought conditions, as defined within its individual plan.

The declaration of a Level 2 – Significant Drought requires the Drought Management Task Force to meet on a regular basis to more closely assess conditions across the state, coordinate dissemination of information to the public, and help state, federal and local agencies prepare any responses that may be needed in the future. The Task Force will meet on a monthly basis or more frequently as conditions warrant; the next meeting is scheduled for Thursday, September 3, 2020 at 1:00 pm and will be held virtually via Zoom.

Last year, EEA completed a two-year process and updated the Massachusetts Drought Management Plan to better assess drought conditions across the state and maximize the state’s ability to prepare for and respond to a drought. The Plan also provides guidance to communities on drought preparedness and outlines response actions that can be taken at the local level.

For further information on water conservation and what residents and communities can do, visit the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs’ drought page.

watering restrictions – one day a week

water ban-2

 

Public Works

Posted on: June 26, 2020

Water Restriction Elevated to Tier 3

Nonessential water use limited to once a week

On Monday, June 22, 2020, the Board of Selectmen, following a recommendation from the Board of Water and Sewerage, announced that Medfield is now subject to a Tier 3 Water Restriction. This restriction goes into effect immediately and will remain in effect until further notice.

A Tier 3 water restriction limits nonessential water use to once per week. Even numbered houses are allowed nonessential water use on Mondays. Odd numbered houses are allowed nonessential water use on Thursdays.

Examples of nonessential outdoor water uses that are limited to once per week include but are not limited to:

  • Uses that are not required for health or safety reasons
  • Irrigation of lawns via sprinklers or automatic irrigation systems
  • Washing of vehicles other than by means of a commercial car wash, except as necessary for operator safety
  • Washing of exterior building surfaces, parking lots, driveways or sidewalks, except as necessary to apply paint, preservatives, stucco, pavement or cement

Example of an acceptable outdoor water use that is not affected:

  • Irrigation of lawns, gardens, flowers, and ornamental plants via hand held hoses only

Please note that allowed uses, or nonessential water use on the assigned day, is not permitted between the hours of 9 am and 5 pm, when evaporation and evapotranspiration are highest.

This water restriction was put into place due to the extended dry spell. In addition, daily water usage has continued to increase, despite the Tier 2 water restriction that limited water use to every other day. The Town’s water pumps are running significantly more hours per day than is typical, increasing the risk of mechanical issues. In addition, water levels in the Town’s storage tanks have declined.

The Town’s Water Rules and Regulations include additional information on water restrictions and can be found at this link. MassDEP maintains a list of all communities with water restrictions in place.

Water uses not subject to mandatory restrictions are those required:

  • For health or safety reasons
  • By regulation
  • For the production of food and fiber
  • For the maintenance of livestock
  • To meet the core functions of a business (for example, irrigation by plant nurseries as necessary to maintain stock).

Thank you for adhering to this new water restriction and working together to reduce our water consumption.

Questions about the water restriction can be directed to Director of Public Works Maurice Goulet at 508-906-3002 or mgoulet@medfield.net.

Drought declared

The emailed information below was forwarded by Town Administrator Kristine Trierweiler this afternoon. When I went following the links to find out what the declaration of drought meant, I found this map, which seems to indicate that the two days of watering per week we are now allowed is on target.

2020-june-24-dep-watering-restrictions

DROUGHT

After a review of hydrologic conditions in Massachusetts, the Drought Management Task Force (DMTF) has recommended a Level 2 drought designation for all regions except the Southeast and the Cape & Islands. View the details and presentations from USGS, DCR, DEP, DER, MWRA, and NWS here.

For further information on water conservation and what residents can do, visit the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs’ drought page, the Department of Conservation and Recreation’s drought management page, and the MassDEP Water Conservation page.

The Drought Management Task Force, chaired by the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs and the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency, consists of officials from state and federal agencies and professional organizations with responsibility for areas likely to be affected by drought conditions. For more information, visit their website.

Watering ban details

water ban-2

 

Public Works

Posted on: June 16, 2020

Water Restriction Elevated to Tier 3

Nonessential water use limited to once a week

On Monday, June 22, 2020, the Board of Selectmen, following a recommendation from the Board of Water and Sewerage, announced that Medfield is now subject to a Tier 3 Water Restriction. This restriction goes into effect immediately and will remain in effect until further notice.

A Tier 3 water restriction limits nonessential water use to once per week. Even numbered houses are allowed nonessential water use on Mondays. Odd numbered houses are allowed nonessential water use on Thursdays.

Examples of nonessential outdoor water uses that are limited to once per week include but are not limited to:

  • Uses that are not required for health or safety reasons
  • Irrigation of lawns via sprinklers or automatic irrigation systems
  • Washing of vehicles other than by means of a commercial car wash, except as necessary for operator safety
  • Washing of exterior building surfaces, parking lots, driveways or sidewalks, except as necessary to apply paint, preservatives, stucco, pavement or cement

Example of an acceptable outdoor water use that is not affected:

  • Irrigation of lawns, gardens, flowers, and ornamental plants via hand held hoses only

Please note that allowed uses, or nonessential water use on the assigned day, is not permitted between the hours of 9 am and 5 pm, when evaporation and evapotranspiration are highest.

This water restriction was put into place due to the extended dry spell. In addition, daily water usage has continued to increase, despite the Tier 2 water restriction that limited water use to every other day. The Town’s water pumps are running significantly more hours per day than is typical, increasing the risk of mechanical issues. In addition, water levels in the Town’s storage tanks have declined.

The Town’s Water Rules and Regulations include additional information on water restrictions and can be found at this link. MassDEP maintains a list of all communities with water restrictions in place.

Water uses not subject to mandatory restrictions are those required:

  • For health or safety reasons
  • By regulation
  • For the production of food and fiber
  • For the maintenance of livestock
  • To meet the core functions of a business (for example, irrigation by plant nurseries as necessary to maintain stock).

Thank you for adhering to this new water restriction and working together to reduce our water consumption.

Questions about the water restriction can be directed to Director of Public Works Maurice Goulet at 508-906-3002 or mgoulet@medfield.net.

Day per week watering -odd Mondays / even Thursdays

water ban-2

From: Nicholas Milano <nmilano@medfield.net>
Date: Mon, Jun 22, 2020 at 12:21 PM
Subject: Water Restriction
To: Kristine Trierweiler <ktrierweiler@medfield.net>

 

The Board of Water and Sewerage just voted to request the BOS to approve a Tier 3 water restriction, which would limit nonessential outdoor water use to one day per week. 

  • Even numbered houses can water lawns on Mondays
  • Odd numbered houses can water lawns on Thursdays 

Per the by-laws, the Water and Sewer makes the recommendation, but BOS has to approve it.

 

They would like it to go into effect immediately and until further notice. They also asked about communicating it out and would like us to use the Reverse 911 system.

 

This restriction is due to increasing usage (usage has increased each day over the past week) and the extended dry spell.

 

Typical, daily use is 1.5 to 1.75 million gallons per day. We are at around 2.2 million gallons per day and climbing. Even since sending out notices about the odd/even usage restrictions, the total daily usage has continued to climb.

 

The pumps are running 20 hours a day. Typically they would run 14-16 hours a day.

 

In addition, we have a risk of not maintaining enough water in the storage tanks for fire suppression.

 

Thanks,

 

Nick

 

Nicholas J. Milano

Assistant Town Administrator

Town of Medfield

459 Main Street

Medfield, MA 02052

o: 508-906-3009

Water ban to tighten

water ban-2

The Water & Sewer Board will be asking the Select Board, in an emergency meeting at 3PM this afternoon, to institute a stricter water ban, given the amount of recent water usage.  I think Kris said we will be going from even odd watering to once a week watering.

This resident pleads guilty to being part of the problem – I watered my lawn twice this past week in order to try to keep it from dying.  I had to replace it twice and do not want to have to ever do so again – it was too much work.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Event Details

Return to Previous

View Map
Date:
June 22, 2020
Time:
3:00 PM - 3:30 PM
Location:
This meeting will be held remotely on Zoom due to the COVID-19 state of emergency.
Address:
Medfield, MA 02052

$10.34 m. water treatment facility

A water treatment facility at a cost of $10.34 m. is needed to remove the iron and manganese from water the town gets from wells # 3 & 4 behind the Wheelock School.  This is the complete 147 engineering report.

20200617-Medfield Wells 3 4 WTP Preliminary Design Report – Final – May2020

This is the 6,000 sq. ft. building one gets –

filtration project bld.png

This was the email received yesterday transmitting the report.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Dear Selectmen,

 

In case you did not know, we received the preliminary design report for the water filtration project.  As a refresher, this is to remove naturally occurring high levels of manganese in our well water, and to re-develop Wells 3 and 4.  It is a 147 page document, attached for your perusal in case it has not been forwarded to you yet.

 

We decided to get it on everyone’s radar, and we posted it to the Town website.

 

This is tracking to a $10.34 MM project, that will be presented at the ATM in 2021.

filtration project

 

All the best,

 

Bill Harvey

 

Chairman

Medfield Board of Water and Sewerage